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Are you thinking of becoming a federal employee? Or, perhaps you have recently joined the federal workplace. Here is a forum to share experience and ask for insight for those already a member of the largest employer in the USA.

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StewieG  
#1 Posted : Saturday, June 18, 2022 6:27:30 PM(UTC)
StewieG

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I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?
FS0201  
#2 Posted : Saturday, June 18, 2022 7:20:59 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


It is not uncommon to decline after firm offer; there is no permanent record that another agency/hiring official would ever see. It is possible that someone (selecting official) could be annoyed and remember but most likely they will simply move on to next person on list.
The excuse of, "I read it on FederalSoup..." won't work. Please do your due diligence.
Gal Friday  
#3 Posted : Sunday, June 19, 2022 2:26:45 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!
StewieG  
#4 Posted : Sunday, June 19, 2022 3:23:23 PM(UTC)
StewieG

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Originally Posted by: Gal Friday Go to Quoted Post

Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!


Thanks for the advice. While that may be true in many cases, there are aspects to my current role and company where I am absolutely confident that’s not the case.

Let’s get back to the question! FS0201, thanks for the info. Much appreciated!
someoldguy  
#5 Posted : Sunday, June 19, 2022 4:10:59 PM(UTC)
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This happens fairly frequently, and hiring officials know that many people have multiple applications active. Maybe if they could extend offers more rapidly after an interview... but I digress.

As someone pointed out, maybe that specific office might remember but not for long... most positions seem to have a ton of applicants (which was also pointed out).
DISCLAIMER: You read it on an open internet forum :)
TheUnderverse15  
#6 Posted : Monday, June 20, 2022 12:17:49 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Gal Friday Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!



That is some interesting and insane advice to give someone. Were you ever in this experience. Biggest question is are you even a federal employee?

frankgonzalez  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, June 21, 2022 4:44:14 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: TheUnderverse15 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Gal Friday Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!



That is some interesting and insane advice to give someone. Were you ever in this experience. Biggest question is are you even a federal employee?

Actually, this is fairly common in the private sector. If someone is looking to leave and is in a fairly critical role, the company will seek to keep them but also look to a plan B as they now know they are vulnerable to the employee leaving. Can be especially true if there are high level negotiations for acquisition by another company...they need to show stability to get the best package in the sale, and people leaving doesn't help demonstrate that and could lower the offer. Once you agree to stay, the other offer gets declined, and then you can be stuck with worse working conditions and management are more concerned about making certain you are replaceable (either by training internal assets to do your role or by looking at hiring people-at a lower pay- to take over those roles) before you try and leave again. There will be a short period where things are great (don't want you to see if the offer is still available after all!), and once enough time has passed that you cannot leave to the job you were originally offered, the climate at work shifts (after all, you are considered a traitor and not loyal to the company who had to value you once another employer decided you had more value to them!).

Not all companies do this, but enough do to be aware of the possibility and use that in your decision matrix as to whether you trust your company to not act like this.

Generally, if I have asked for a promotion, career development, etc at my current job and it only gets offered when I have a job offer in hand...I'm probably going to take the new job. After all, there was a reason I was looking in the first place! And right now, (personally) I'm at a place in my career where money isn't the driving factor of looking for a new job. Work/Life balance and job satisfaction are the factors I look at now. However, each of us has our own priorities that we need to look at when making a decision. The above is something to consider when making that decision_ that is, is the counteroffer being made in good faith or to simply hang onto you until you can be easily replaced with little impact on the company/mission?

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
thanks 1 user thanked frankgonzalez for this useful post.
Gal Friday on 6/23/2022(UTC)
TheUnderverse15  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, June 21, 2022 8:10:18 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: TheUnderverse15 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Gal Friday Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!



That is some interesting and insane advice to give someone. Were you ever in this experience. Biggest question is are you even a federal employee?

Actually, this is fairly common in the private sector. If someone is looking to leave and is in a fairly critical role, the company will seek to keep them but also look to a plan B as they now know they are vulnerable to the employee leaving. Can be especially true if there are high level negotiations for acquisition by another company...they need to show stability to get the best package in the sale, and people leaving doesn't help demonstrate that and could lower the offer. Once you agree to stay, the other offer gets declined, and then you can be stuck with worse working conditions and management are more concerned about making certain you are replaceable (either by training internal assets to do your role or by looking at hiring people-at a lower pay- to take over those roles) before you try and leave again. There will be a short period where things are great (don't want you to see if the offer is still available after all!), and once enough time has passed that you cannot leave to the job you were originally offered, the climate at work shifts (after all, you are considered a traitor and not loyal to the company who had to value you once another employer decided you had more value to them!).

Not all companies do this, but enough do to be aware of the possibility and use that in your decision matrix as to whether you trust your company to not act like this.

Generally, if I have asked for a promotion, career development, etc at my current job and it only gets offered when I have a job offer in hand...I'm probably going to take the new job. After all, there was a reason I was looking in the first place! And right now, (personally) I'm at a place in my career where money isn't the driving factor of looking for a new job. Work/Life balance and job satisfaction are the factors I look at now. However, each of us has our own priorities that we need to look at when making a decision. The above is something to consider when making that decision_ that is, is the counteroffer being made in good faith or to simply hang onto you until you can be easily replaced with little impact on the company/mission?



Definitely not all companies do this. In this climate they surely aren't throwing money around to keep someone, especially if its contractor. They rather get rid of you so they can get someone on a lowball deal and save a few bucks. I have seen DHS pull this with some employees leaving for other agencies.

For the OP, just do what you feel is right, you may regret not taking a chance with federal government. They waited until the last second to send you a deal, is it worth the squeeze?
Gal Friday  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 22, 2022 10:12:45 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: TheUnderverse15 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Gal Friday Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: StewieG Go to Quoted Post
I’ve received and accepted a firm job offer with a federal agency. When I gave notice at my (private sector) job the next day, I was offered a substantial amount of incentives to stay (raise, opportunity to implement changes I’ve proposed and previously been shot down on, etc).

I’m quite tempted to take it, but it’s still a toss up. One thing I’d like to understand better are the ramifications of withdrawing from the federal job at this point, if I were to ever try and work for the government in the future.

Any insight is helpful, but specific questions I’m curious about are:
-Is there some sort of permanent record where, years down the road, a hiring agency will see I withdrew after accepting a position?
-Is doing this rare (and offensive enough) that a future hiring agency would view it negatively? Or does this happen all the time?


Never take a counteroffer! You just caught them while workers have the upper hand. If you stay for more money, they will just make it up in the future with lower raises ... and once they know you're thinking of leaving, it gives them time to find a replacement for you so they aren't caught by surprise next time you want to leave. If the economy goes into recession next year, you will also be the first to be laid off!



That is some interesting and insane advice to give someone. Were you ever in this experience. Biggest question is are you even a federal employee?

Actually, this is fairly common in the private sector. If someone is looking to leave and is in a fairly critical role, the company will seek to keep them but also look to a plan B as they now know they are vulnerable to the employee leaving. Can be especially true if there are high level negotiations for acquisition by another company...they need to show stability to get the best package in the sale, and people leaving doesn't help demonstrate that and could lower the offer. Once you agree to stay, the other offer gets declined, and then you can be stuck with worse working conditions and management are more concerned about making certain you are replaceable (either by training internal assets to do your role or by looking at hiring people-at a lower pay- to take over those roles) before you try and leave again. There will be a short period where things are great (don't want you to see if the offer is still available after all!), and once enough time has passed that you cannot leave to the job you were originally offered, the climate at work shifts (after all, you are considered a traitor and not loyal to the company who had to value you once another employer decided you had more value to them!).

Not all companies do this, but enough do to be aware of the possibility and use that in your decision matrix as to whether you trust your company to not act like this.

Generally, if I have asked for a promotion, career development, etc at my current job and it only gets offered when I have a job offer in hand...I'm probably going to take the new job. After all, there was a reason I was looking in the first place! And right now, (personally) I'm at a place in my career where money isn't the driving factor of looking for a new job. Work/Life balance and job satisfaction are the factors I look at now. However, each of us has our own priorities that we need to look at when making a decision. The above is something to consider when making that decision_ that is, is the counteroffer being made in good faith or to simply hang onto you until you can be easily replaced with little impact on the company/mission?



Frank consistently gives good advice ... you should listen to him. Sure, maybe people can name a couple of exceptions where it worked out when an employee stayed or went back to their old job, but that's true probably only 5 - 10% of the time. So just because someone can give an exception or two, it doesn't mean that Frank isn't 95% right!
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