Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Information Security

Information security can mean protecting information and information systems from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification or destruction. This goes beyond just computers and networks. Risks and threats can come from individuals, acts of nature, and new technology.

This topic affects everyone in the federal workforce - top to bottom. Thus, it is also the responsibility of everyone in the federal workforce to protect the information from threats.

Share your experience with securing information.

7 Pages«<34567>
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
totj  
#81 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:23:13 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285

You do know that I am a Base IA Manager, right?

So are you educating me or arguing with me?

Do you even have the certifications you are talking about?

You do not have to have a CCNA or CCNP to become a CCIE. Neither of those certifications is a prerequisite for the CCIE.

Why would the policy guy need to have a CCIE? Because the policy has to be grounded in technological capability - actual vulnerability and technical solutions. :Gasp: That actually would be the job of a.... CCIE/CCNP Security/CCNA Security/etc. Big picture FTW. 

Do you think policy guys shake a magic 8-ball and come up with a random framework that establishes boundaries of security posture?

This is getting old...

totj2011-07-20 17:31:54
truotsuko  
#82 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:54:16 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)


Normal
0




false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE













MicrosoftInternetExplorer4



























































































































































/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:"";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}


I swear you must be on Cisco's payroll, I have been doing IA
for the past 5 years and I am also the IAM at my installation, so please sell
that bag of beans elsewhere. Since you like definitions let me give you what Cisco defines CCIE as;

Quote:


The Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) certification is accepted
worldwide as the most prestigious networking certification in the industry.
Network Engineers holding an active Cisco CCIE certification are recognized for
their expert network engineering skills and mastery of Cisco products and
solutions. The CCIE community has established a reputation of leading the
networking industry in deep technical networking knowledge and are deployed into the most technically challenging network assignments.


I have continued to tell you to get off your singular focus, IA is about so
much more than networking, you honestly do not need to have this much depth of
understanding to be an IA guy you are talking out of your fourth point of
contact. CCIE is purely networking, yes security in networking but it has
nothing to do with database security, a simple job search of the term CCIE your
results are for network engineers (Often Senior), maybe a Sr Network Security
Engineer. Search CISSP jobs your results are more in line with security and
Information Assurance or auditing. Now with respect to CCNA or CCNP not being a
prerequisite to CCIE, I was wrong. See the difference between you and I is I do
not need an overwhelming amount of proof for me to admit I am wrong, and I do
not change the subject and dance around. Stay on the focus CCIE is a much too involved certification for IA as its principle focus is networking. 

Definition of IA is (according to http://www.sans.org/read...-security-engineer_33508)
Quote:

Commonly these individuals are responsible for

everything from the firewall and anti-virus solution to physical security and incident response to

security architecture. You can think of them as the jack of all trades, master of none, security

generalist and IA point man. These positions are very similar to the small IT shop, all-in-one IT

position, the Swiss Army knife of IT. It is common for these types of positions to develop out of
necessity from small IT shops and can even form small (five or fewer) IA shops.

But then again I need to be careful quoting SANS to you as that may not be accredited to your standard.



SF18C  
#83 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:54:51 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/25/2007(UTC)
Posts: 294

totj wrote:
  

Do you think policy guys shake a magic 8-ball and come up with a random framework that establishes boundaries of security posture?

This is getting old...
 

On the first part...yeah "if" they knew how to shake the 8-ball!  Or at least some of the ones I have met!LOL

 

Case in point...the CISSP that was trying to do a network discovery scan but didn't have the first idea about ping, netstat, arp tables or the difference between MAC address and IP address.  It turned out okay when a NON-degree holding CCNA-cert'ed network manager squared her away!

 

On the second part...yeah!

 
Oh and I am the Data & Voice Network Chief for my base!
SF18C2011-07-20 18:03:04
totj  
#84 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 10:59:29 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285


SF18C wrote:
totj wrote:
  

Do you think policy guys shake a magic 8-ball and come up with a random framework that establishes boundaries of security posture?

This is getting old...
 

On the first part...yeah "if" they knew how to shake the 8-ball!  Or at least some of the ones I have met!LOL

 

Case in point...the CISSP that was trying to do a network discovery scan but didn't have the first idea about ping, netstat, arp tables or the difference between MAC address and IP address.  It turned out okay when a NON-degree holding CCNA-cert'ed network manager squared her away!

 

On the second part...yeah!

 
Oh and I am the Data & Voice Network Chief for my base!

HAHA yea... I think we have both been in that boat before lmao!

I was the senior network analyst on my base as a contractor before I went civilian. I know all to well what you mean!
truotsuko  
#85 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:01:49 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)



v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}



Normal
0
false



false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE













MicrosoftInternetExplorer4



























































































































































/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:"";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}


Finally I have never said anything about an IA guy not
needing networking experience I said that CCIE was too involved in networking,
CCNA suffices, that is not to say that an IA guy with CCIE is worthless on the
contrary I really tip my hat off to him that is quite the accomplishment. But
to understand what you need to, to be an effective Information Assurance guy,
you consider defense in depth in layers; that goes from the type of locks on
the door to the vulnerabilities that are on a certain server, Anti Virus
engines, to tasks as menial as ensuring users are properly trained. Also
circuit accreditation (C&A) process, accrediting servers to connect, performing scanning.


Look I am not saying that it does not help to have a certain amount of
networking knowledge as an IA guy, the same as knowledge with Microsoft
products helps to. But if you create a climate where you think an IA guy should be the SME at all areas then his credentials will be something like this;


CISSP, MCA: Windows Server: Directory, CCIE, CIW Grand Master Developer, PMP,
SNIA Certified Storage Networking Expert (SCSN-E), Oracle Certified Associate, Physical Security Professional (PSP);

To mention but a few certifications, now I am obviously speaking in extremes
but I do it to prove a point. As an Information Assurance Manager your focus is
not soley the network, you have other things that can cause security concerns
and if the bulk of your knowledge is in networking, great you will make an
outstanding Network Engineer or whatever flavor of networking you choose
(security or whatever else), but those who mean your organization harm will
simply find another way to get in. Point you learn what you need to to make
intelligent security decisions about whatever and move on. There should be
other professionals whose job it is to "network" or "configure
the Domain Controller" jobs like that are to critical to have one person
doing it all. Focus on security if you want, focus on network security but if
you are equating IA to network security then you need to talk to that database
admin who says that IA's central focus ought to be on the value of the data. OK am off my soap box now Wink




truotsuko2011-07-20 19:10:58
truotsuko  
#86 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:03:48 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)

Quote:

 

Case in point...the CISSP that was trying to do a network discovery scan but didn't have the first idea about ping, netstat, arp tables or the difference between MAC address and IP address.  It turned out okay when a NON-degree holding CCNA-cert'ed network manager squared her away!

 

On the second part...yeah!

 
Oh and I am the Data & Voice Network Chief for my base!


You are making my point, you do not need CCIE to know how to ping, or netstat, or what arp tables are, or ISDN all that you learn from CCNA damn that is what I have been saying all along.

totj  
#87 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:05:45 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285


truotsuko wrote:


Normal
0




false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE













MicrosoftInternetExplorer4



























































































































































/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:"";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}


I swear you must be on Cisco's payroll, I have been doing IA
for the past 5 years and I am also the IAM at my installation, so please sell
that bag of beans elsewhere. Since you like definitions let me give you what Cisco defines CCIE as;

Dude please stop. I worked for Cisco as a network engineer for several years. I know what a CCIE is. For christs sake I was studying for my CCIE Service Provider just a few years ago. If you having to keep referring to definitions, it just demonstrates how little you actually understand the big picture. Knowing vs understanding; there is a huge difference there.

I have worked or interfaced with IA at all 3 tiers. I am a network engineer by trade. I have the BS, MS, 2 Cisco certs, Sec+ and am working on my own toward the CCNP while my management is sending me to PMP training. I have about 4 or 5 years experience on the sys admin side as well. Ive literally just about done it all with few exceptions.

Chill out already. Go to WGU. Get your MS in IA. Further your career. We will all be happy for you. Personally, I dont really care what you do.

totj  
#88 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:10:53 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285


truotsuko wrote:

Quote:

 

Case in point...the CISSP that was trying to do a network discovery scan but didn't have the first idea about ping, netstat, arp tables or the difference between MAC address and IP address.  It turned out okay when a NON-degree holding CCNA-cert'ed network manager squared her away!

 

On the second part...yeah!

 
Oh and I am the Data & Voice Network Chief for my base!


You are making my point, you do not need CCIE to know how to ping, or netstat, or what arp tables are, or ISDN all that you learn from CCNA damn that is what I have been saying all along.


You really dont want to go there... you dont even have a CCNA. 

And no one uses ISDN anymore except for VTC's, and even thats moving to IP.

Stop, just please stop. Everytime you post I want to stab myself. 

He isnt making your point either...
truotsuko  
#89 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:21:18 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)
Quote:

Dude please stop. I worked for Cisco as a network engineer for several years. I know what a CCIE is. For christs sake I was studying for my CCIE Service Provider just a few years ago. If you having to keep referring to definitions, it just demonstrates how little you actually understand the big picture. Knowing vs understanding; there is a huge difference there.

I have worked or interfaced with IA at all 3 tiers. I am a network engineer by trade. I have the BS, MS, 2 Cisco certs, Sec+ and am working on my own toward the CCNP while my management is sending me to PMP training. I have about 4 or 5 years experience on the sys admin side as well. Ive literally just about done it all with few exceptions.

Chill out already. Go to WGU. Get your MS in IA. Further your career. We will all be happy for you. Personally, I dont really care what you do.



How old are you honestly, listen no one here is questioning your credentials I do not know why you feel the need to post them, I myself am quite credentialed but it does no good typing them here in this forum as it does not further your point. Stay with the focus of the conversation, your deriding an IA Masters program with CCNA in it, I think that is a narrow focus as you clearly have not shown anything in any of the string of conversations that shows you understand the scope of what IA truly is, I have no doubt that you are an outstanding network engineer, but in the realm of IA with statements like you NEED CCIE to be a good IA manager, shows that your focus is solely on the networking aspects and nothing else.
With respect to ISDN not being in use anymore, dude stop typing because as you said they are still used for VTCs and guess what as an IAM you have to accredit that too.
Please do not stab yourself totj you are providing me plenty of entertainment because I finally finished accrediting my circuits and I have a scan running that will take a few hours, come on keep it going "YOU CAN DO IT"..

truotsuko2011-07-20 19:27:25
totj  
#90 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:35:32 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285


truotsuko wrote:

How old are you honestly, listen no one here is questioning your credentials I do not know why you feel the need to post them, I myself am quite credentialed but it does no good typing them here in this forum as it does not further your point. Stay with the focus of the conversation, your deriding an IA Masters program with CCNA in it, I think that is a narrow focus as you clearly have not shown anything in any of the string of conversations that shows you understand the scope of what IA truly is, I have no doubt that you are an outstanding network engineer, but in the realm of IA with statements like you NEED CCIE to be a good IA manager, shows that your focus is solely on the networking aspects and nothing else.
With respect to ISDN not being in use anymore, dude stop typing because as you said they are still used for VTCs and guess what as an IAM you have to accredit that too.
Please do not stab yourself totj you are providing me plenty of entertainment because I finally finished accrediting my circuits and I have a scan running that will take a few hours, come on keep it going "YOU CAN DO IT"..


1. Im deriding the premise that WGU is some sort of respectable academic institution.

2. I never said you need a CCIE to be a good IA Manager. I said that I expect a respectable masters program to have CCIE level material in it, and that a masters program that only dived into CCNA material was a complete and utter joke, which it is.

I also said that people who have CCIEs (and the like mind you) are the ones contributing to writing the IA framework, because, it is the technological capabilities, vulnerabilities, and mitigations that provide the underpinning for said framework.

3. ISDN isnt used anymore. Its not even widely used in VTCs - currently all of that has moved/is moving to an IP based environment. Can you still find ISDN if you look for it? Sure. Same with token ring. Both are dead technologies, and it is an industry accepted truth that neither are used anymore. ISDN isnt even on the CCNA exam anymore and hasnt been for a while. Im sure I can find some functioning Commodore computers laying around - are you doing to reject the premise that they arent used anymore? Dont be stupid.

4. It is clear you received a degree from an institution with no minimum academic standards or rigor. You cant even construct a proper sentence, let alone communicate concise thoughts through them. Your inability to distinguish between the literal and the figurative in light of a premise, or position highlights the larger overtones of this discussion.

5. You may be a qualified IAM. However, others in here who hold degrees from institutions far more academically credible and respected than WGU, and those of us who hold certifications much more technically focused, are telling you that you dont really understand as much as you think you do. At some point you need to stop and listen. Thats what being educated is about - the ability to open your mind and accept something contrary to your predisposition.

Good luck in your masters program. We all wish you the best.
truotsuko  
#91 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:58:15 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)

Totj I can tell you are intelligent but you are going about this all wrong, CCIE is not a run a mill cert, it is more exclusive and far more technical than CISSP. Now as far as me I have had a CCNA but back when I took it in 2000 ISDN was part of it, I never claimed anything close to being a Network guy (but back in the day I did work briefly as one), with regards to it not being in use (ISDN that is) you are right it is antiquated but used heavily in the military for reasons like when you work in remote countries sometimes that is the fastest available. I have maintained my Microsoft certs since 2000, I also have CISSP (non technical) I am Sun certified, also an Oracle DB admin; am not even going to mention CompTia cause those are all a joke as far as I am concerned (have all of them but Linux +). But I am trying to tell you that IA is not as hands on nowhere close to CCIE level. It does require knowledge but in a wide spectrum of IT all I am saying is CCIE is far too deep for IA, not to say if one is smart enough to get it they shouldn't.   
truotsuko2011-07-21 14:16:34
truotsuko  
#92 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:18:16 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)

One last thought before I head to bed, I have never tried to challenge you on anything regarding Networking as a matter of fact I have conceded several times that CCIE is not something you just decide to do without a bevy of experience. But with regards to Information Assurance you honestly do not have the slightest clue what it entails because for you to mention that an IA program should have CCIE as part of its curriculum makes me truly wonder if YOU know what it takes to get CCIE certified (my uncle has his). There are currently a little over 25,000 individuals with an active CCIE certification, all I have said and continue to say is that as an Information Assurance Manager you have no need for the depth of knowledge that CCIE gives you (if you have it great but you are not going to use half of it) there are Network Admins who do that job, there are also Network Security Managers who compliment you in that aspect. All you need is to be able to speak intelligently on it, I would say that N+ is way too basic but for the right mix CCNA or for that matter maybe even CCNP is all that is required (hey I still think CCNP is too deep but that is my personal opinion).

Now just because you are an alternate of one the many IAMs' on your installation does not make you an IA expert; you are a great addition to an IA team because I would want someone on my team who I can trust to grasp the length and breadth of networking, just like I would want a DB Admin and a Systems Admin. IA is too vast and broad to be singularly focused at the depth of CCIE with networking. I tried to make this point earlier and I will try again, can you concede that as far as Cisco is concerned CCIE is the top tier certification? If you can concede that then by your argument an IAM ought to be certified in every TOP tier facet of IT. And that is the crux of our disagreement, you said it yourself earlier IA deals mainly with policy with regards to security, I hate to be the one to tell you this but there is so much more to the CIA triad than simply networking. Now if you are trying to tell me that a CCIE can double as a DB admin, or an Enterprise Admin (Server side) then I need to reread what I thought I read on Ciscos' website about what a CCIE cert credentialed you for. Never mind the fact that it is a Vendor specific certification, what will you do when you encounter a SQL issue? Information Assurance, contrary to what you may seem to believe does not center solely on networks, they are a big part of it but not the central focus. What would you as a CCIE do if your SQL database is corrupted, or if someone bypassed your security controls and stole one of your boundary routers, all your technical knowledge cannot help you with that because no matter how you think you have secured something if you have no physical access of it, it is only a matter of time before the data is lost. All facets of information are important and if you focus too deeply on one you lose control of the other, that is the reason why for the super technical networking stuff you defer to the experts, but you continue to focus singularly on networking as though that is all IA is about. Part of being an IAM involves the following,

o   Identity management

o   Security incident management

o   Network perimeter security

o   Systems development

o   Project management

o   IT risk management

o   Data management

o   Vulnerability management

None of the individual components are more important than the other, they all have equal importance. But I can see how you being a network engineer think that you are the sole one who "assures" all the information, there are other players too and your job in security is no more important than the others.

truotsuko  
#93 Posted : Wednesday, July 20, 2011 11:40:55 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)

totj wrote:

5. You may be a qualified IAM. However, others in here who hold degrees from institutions far more academically credible and respected than WGU, and those of us who hold certifications much more technically focused, are telling you that you dont really understand as much as you think you do. At some point you need to stop and listen. Thats what being educated is about - the ability to open your mind and accept something contrary to your predisposition.

Good luck in your masters program. We all wish you the best.

I can’t resist, I was in IA long before I got my BS and my degree is not in Information security it's in Systems Administration. I was hired because I had my certifications not my degree that was a personal goal I set for myself. To be honest before I got in IA I was misguided because I somehow thought it would be more hands on than it is. I use my knowledge on a day to day basis, but if there is something I need done on the Exchange Server I know enough (without being an Exchange Admin) to let them know what needs to be done and why, the same with a firewall configuration, there is no reason why I should be logging on to anyone those sensitive systems without the knowledge of their respective administrators and making changes (have you ever heard of separation of duties); but I do need enough knowledge to explain to them what needs to be done and I have to be able to speak their language. Now if your IA guys on your installation are all networking experts, then who secures the servers, who secures databases, domain controllers, exchange servers. By your definition they are all IA, I would counter that they are all part of the IA team but there can only be a set of individuals whose job it is to coordinate all that madness, that is the reason the title "manager" follows IA because you manage the ENTIRE program not simply the networking aspect. Please do not try to challenge me on this before you read, NIST, NSA, Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, Department of Defense, shoot even Cisco as a company all grasp this concept of defense in depth; not one layer of networking and damn the rest. Everyone plays a part, but there can only be a few who manage that, as a network manager your day should be filled with managing the network not applying patches and pushing patches across the enterprise. Nor should you as a network manager have to accredit a server to be on the domain in whatever capacity it is to be used in. If there is software that one of your units wants to purchase, it is not the network manager that determines if it should be on the network, it is the IAM that has to first research it and see what impact it may have on existing systems. What we have here is a total disconnect you think you know it all, but outside of networking you truly have no idea the title of alternate Information Assurance Manager has clouded your judgment into thinking that you are the cure all end all with information, you may have gone to a very good school and if you majored in Information Security you must have forgotten what they taught you because you are not making any sense at all.

truotsuko2011-07-21 08:01:05
totj  
#94 Posted : Thursday, July 21, 2011 9:04:15 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285



truotsuko  
#95 Posted : Thursday, July 21, 2011 10:10:43 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)

I had a feeling your response would be something childish (creative and funny I will admit but childish nonetheless), if you are going to have a discussion have one, but if you are presenting something as fact do not be surprised if you are challenged when you have nothing but your word to back you up.

 

I continue to refer to government agencies that deal with Information Assurance because as it pertains to National Security they are directly impacted. If you want to pursue a career in IA I strongly caution you to get some additional training that is why CISSP, CISA, CISM, CSSLP, GIAC certifications, CEH, CEPT, CHFI, CAP, and to a lesser extent S Plus(note I said lesser because that is akin to comparing network + to CCNA, I know you understand that comparison). When you "grow up" in IA you will realize that your approach, while well meaning, is incorrect. My advice, stick to what you know and understand, you have proven yourself to be an exceptional network engineer, by virtue of your certifications, leave the job of assuring information to those who are adequately trained for it.

 

I am hoping this will end it, but I know better as you have throughout this thread not once provided anything tangible or substantial for that matter that backs up 10% (ok that might have been a little harsh, ok 20%) of the absurd claims you have made regarding IA, good luck to you and have a great and rewarding career.

I honestly never thought in my entire life I would ever meet someone who claims education but is so obstinate.

truotsuko2011-07-21 23:55:20
totj  
#96 Posted : Thursday, July 21, 2011 8:56:10 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/29/2010(UTC)
Posts: 285

Mkay.

Good luck at Western Governors University.

One day youll get to play on the varsity team.

cischico  
#97 Posted : Sunday, July 31, 2011 3:20:50 PM(UTC)

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/8/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2

I signed up for WGU because of this thread.

truotsuko  
#98 Posted : Sunday, July 31, 2011 3:54:40 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)
Good, at least someone who can research...

WWVJ  
#99 Posted : Wednesday, August 10, 2011 3:34:51 AM(UTC)

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 4/7/2009(UTC)
Posts: 6

Avoid UMUC and the similar diploma sellers- the credits do not transfer and VA is having a tough time getting Veterans reimbursed for the type of school that takes money, promises jobs, and is unaccountable.

 

Concentrate on Cisco, CompTIA, and Microsoft courses.  There is no easy fix and a certificate does not get you a job.  Volunteer – I actually did volunteer work at A VA Medical Center in the IT department to acquire more hands-on.

truotsuko  
#100 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2011 10:44:42 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2008(UTC)
Posts: 346

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 5 post(s)
Western Governors University (WGU) is a competency-based university. Our academic programs provide a way for students to earn their degrees by demonstrating their skills and knowledge through a series of carefully designed assessments. One competency unit is equivalent to one college semester credit hour. Students receive a mark of PASS, NOT PASSED or WITHDRAWN for each of the registered course assessments in a term, and the marks are defined as follows:
Quote:

PASS: Certifies successful completion of a course of study. The student has demonstrated the required competencies by passing the final assessment with a grade equivalent of B or better or 3.00 grade points on a 4.00 scale.

Quote:

NOT PASSED: Indicates that the student failed to complete a course of study in the time allotted. To meet program requirements, the student generally re-enrolls for the course of study in a subsequent term.

Quote:

WITHDRAWN: Indicates that the student withdrew from the course prior to term completion.


Western Governors University (www.wgu.edu) is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities and is nationally accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC). The WGU Teachers College is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). WGU’s nursing degree programs are accredited by the Commission for Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Our financial code is 033394.
Please contact the Records department if you have any further questions by calling 877-435-7948 x3146, or emailing records@wgu.edu.

Copy of letter that WGU sends along with transcript to any university that you apply for a Masters Program with...


Rss Feed  Atom Feed
Users browsing this topic
Guest (3)
7 Pages«<34567>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.


This page was generated in 0.848 seconds.