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Federal Career Planning and Development

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J GREENE  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 8:56:43 AM(UTC)
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I understand that in order to earn your career ladder promotion you need to have satisfactory job performance and that's basically it.
 
What are the contingencies for getting a grade increase based on the 'promotion potential' of the position?
 
For instance, if your are a GS-09 in a career ladder position of 5/7/9 with promotion potential to GS-12, what factors are used to determine if you can move up to GS-11/12 within that position?
 
*I'm trying to determine where it's worth it in the long term to accept/apply for certain positions. I do not want to do a lot of job hopping.
RetirednHappy  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 9:35:59 AM(UTC)

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As a GS-9 under a Career ladder GS-5/7/9 position, with promotion potential to GS-12, you are currently as far as your initial, "automatic" career ladder can take you. For the GS-11 or 12 levels, your supervision would need to announce those openings and you would have to re-apply and compete for the two higher grades. Your current experience would be credited towrds the promotion, but you would have to compete again. (That would NOT be the case, if your initial selection was to a GS-5/7/9/11/12 position, which, apparently it was NOT.)  Talk to your supervisor about the workload and budget in your organization, which would also have to support an additional position/billet at the GS-11/12 level, for the personnel action to go forward.  Good luck !
Fed1969  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 10:01:35 AM(UTC)

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Satisfactory may not be good enough.  Many managers want their employees to show signs they will do well at the next grade.
Zephyrus  
#4 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 11:37:21 AM(UTC)

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I suggest that you use the search function.  You will find multiple responses in other threads which differ from what you have gotten so far.
spence  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 1:34:37 PM(UTC)

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I don't think this is accurate.  If it was actually identified as "promotion potential" in the original announcement (rather than something like someone saying oh yeah, you can go up to a 12 in this job class, while the promotion potential in the announcement was just a 9), the employee could be appointed noncompetitively.  The employee already competed.

RetirednHappy wrote:
As a GS-9 under a Career ladder GS-5/7/9 position, with promotion potential to GS-12, you are currently as far as your initial, "automatic" career ladder can take you. For the GS-11 or 12 levels, your supervision would need to announce those openings and you would have to re-apply and compete for the two higher grades. Your current experience would be credited towrds the promotion, but you would have to compete again. (That would NOT be the case, if your initial selection was to a GS-5/7/9/11/12 position, which, apparently it was NOT.)  Talk to your supervisor about the workload and budget in your organization, which would also have to support an additional position/billet at the GS-11/12 level, for the personnel action to go forward.  Good luck !


spence2012-03-13 21:42:00
Knight  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, March 13, 2012 9:40:32 PM(UTC)

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It varies from job to job. Some seem to get there by breathing and some need to pass certification. If it is an job in your agency, call and ask.
DHS HR  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 1:09:00 AM(UTC)

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Spence is correct, if you FPL is stated as a GS12 on your SF50 then you have non-competitive promotion potential to that grade level.  You don't have to compete
birdonamission  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 7:48:38 AM(UTC)

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What if the announcement just says GS-11 (not 7/9/11) and promotion potential is 12?
Zephyrus  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 8:55:22 AM(UTC)

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birdonamission wrote:
What if the announcement just says GS-11 (not 7/9/11) and promotion potential is 12?

Same thing as above.  GS-11 PP 12 means non competitive PP otherwise it would say GS-11 PP 11.
birdonamission  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 9:16:35 AM(UTC)

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Zephyrus wrote:

birdonamission wrote:
What if the announcement just says GS-11 (not 7/9/11) and promotion potential is 12?

Same thing as above.  GS-11 PP 12 means non competitive PP otherwise it would say GS-11 PP 11.
OK.  Thanks.  I applied for a position that says that.  It also says one year probation.  Question on that -- I had an HR person say to me that now that I made it past probation with my current position, I won't be subject to one again, even if I were to change series.  Doesn't sound right...is it?
KeyLimePie  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 11:33:13 AM(UTC)

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A 5/7/9 with promotion potential to 12 means typically means they recruited at the 5, 7, and 9 level.  You can be non-competitively promoted up to the 12 when you meet all the requirements (qualifications requirement and time-in-grade).  Regarding job hopping, I really see no reason to actively seek out a different position if you are happy in your current position.  I would recommend developing a strong working relationship with your supervisors so you understand what they expect from you in order to reach the promotions.  If you work with a large group of people hired into similar developmental positions, you can get a feel for how non-competitive promotions are handled.
Also, start looking at announcements for GS 12/13 positions so you can get a feel what makes you a competitive candidate down the road.  If you see assessment questions asking for the same types of duties, then do whatever it takes to get some experience in that, and update your resume along the way.  People don't become strong candidates overnight.  Most people can figure out how to boost their scores by answering a multiple choice question high, but the strong resumes stand out due to actual experience.  Those are the resumes where applicants not only said they did the task, but they went on to explain how, why and the outcome.
If you aren't getting the type of experience that will get you beyond the promotion potential of your current position, and you believe you will get it with a lateral move, you may want to entertain a move to another position with promotion potential to the GS-12 level.  If you can show why you are moving (gaining additional depth or breadth of experience, for instance) on your resume, a transfer without a break in service isn't going to hurt you as much as it would if you simply appeared to move to the same job in a different organization.
Zephyrus  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, March 14, 2012 6:33:39 PM(UTC)

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birdonamission wrote:

Zephyrus wrote:

birdonamission wrote:
What if the announcement just says GS-11 (not 7/9/11) and promotion potential is 12?

Same thing as above.  GS-11 PP 12 means non competitive PP otherwise it would say GS-11 PP 11.
OK.  Thanks.  I applied for a position that says that.  It also says one year probation.  Question on that -- I had an HR person say to me that now that I made it past probation with my current position, I won't be subject to one again, even if I were to change series.  Doesn't sound right...is it?

That's one of those blanket statements that should be taken with a grain of salt.  For example, if you go from a non-supervisory position to a supervisory position depending on the agency you might have to do a new one year probation.  Same for a complete change of job series.
Scott Dickinson  
#13 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 12:42:09 AM(UTC)
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Yes but in supervisor probationary periods you usually do not lose your job, you are re-assigned to another job or one close to what you came from. For external hires I am not sure how they do the supervisory one year probations when you fail it.
EDlbh  
#14 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 3:03:04 AM(UTC)

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A couple of years ago they changed the career ladder.  It use to be automatic, each year you got bumped up to the next ladder position.  Your supervisor had to submit nothing for this to happen. 

This is no longer the case.  Your supervisor needs submit a request for you to get bumped up to the next grade.  In addition, your supervisor can have 'benchmarks' to justify why you didn't get bumped up to the next level.  You can have satisfactory performance evaluations at your 'current grade level', but it doesnt mean you are justified to be bumped up to the next grade level.
 
It is also true, that if you excel, and meet your benchmarks quickly, you can be bumped up faster than the norm.
 
Steps within the GS scale are different.  You are automatically bumped up, UNLESS you get a bad performance eval.
thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
RightGuy45 on 4/19/2017(UTC)
baron90  
#15 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 3:19:13 AM(UTC)

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If your SF-50 that was processed to appoint you into the position states FPL is 12 then you do not need to compete further but your supervisor does have to generate an SF-52 to process this action and you would subsequently receive another SF-50 for the next grade.
DHS HR  
#16 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 4:07:40 AM(UTC)

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It depends at what agency you are at, some require an action to promote you to the next level, we do ours automatically and require an action if you want to hold someone's promotion.
 
You cannot be promoted to the next level until you meet one year time in grade at the next lower level regardless of how your performance is, it is against regulations and illegal.  Perhaps you are confusing it with a quality step increase which management can recommend you recieve prior to waiting the specified waiting period.  If you are on 7/9/11 you have to spend a year at a 7 promoted to a 9, spend a year at a 9 then promoted to the level, this cannot be accelerated unless you have prior tig at the level needed.
DHS HR2012-03-15 12:14:35
J GREENE  
#17 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 9:55:57 AM(UTC)
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That all makes good sense. Im at gs7 now in collections, but Im trying to move to accounting. It would be a lateral move now, but with long term potential. Anyways, it was referred Smile. Thats the first step, so now I'll hurry up and wait.

But I will start reviewing GS 12/13 requirements. Thats a pretty good idea. I admit, when I'm searching, usually if I don't qualify for the job, I don't even want to see it lol. But it seems wise to look ahead. Thank you.
Knight  
#18 Posted : Thursday, March 15, 2012 10:19:44 PM(UTC)

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Good luck. As you do more of this come back and let us know what works and what could be done better.
RightGuy45  
#19 Posted : Wednesday, April 19, 2017 2:33:53 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: EDlbh Go to Quoted Post
A couple of years ago they changed the career ladder. It use to be automatic, each year you got bumped up to the next ladder position. Your supervisor had to submit nothing for this to happen.
This is no longer the case. Your supervisor needs submit a request for you to get bumped up to the next grade. In addition, your supervisor can have 'benchmarks' to justify why you didn't get bumped up to the next level. You can have satisfactory performance evaluations at your 'current grade level', but it doesnt mean you are justified to be bumped up to the next grade level.

It is also true, that if you excel, and meet your benchmarks quickly, you can be bumped up faster than the norm.

Steps within the GS scale are different. You are automatically bumped up, UNLESS you get a bad performance eval.


How can management determine if you're ready for the next level. If you're only assigned current level work ?

TheRealOrange  
#20 Posted : Friday, April 21, 2017 3:09:05 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: RightGuy45 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: EDlbh Go to Quoted Post
A couple of years ago they changed the career ladder. It use to be automatic, each year you got bumped up to the next ladder position. Your supervisor had to submit nothing for this to happen.
This is no longer the case. Your supervisor needs submit a request for you to get bumped up to the next grade. In addition, your supervisor can have 'benchmarks' to justify why you didn't get bumped up to the next level. You can have satisfactory performance evaluations at your 'current grade level', but it doesnt mean you are justified to be bumped up to the next grade level.

It is also true, that if you excel, and meet your benchmarks quickly, you can be bumped up faster than the norm.

Steps within the GS scale are different. You are automatically bumped up, UNLESS you get a bad performance eval.


How can management determine if you're ready for the next level. If you're only assigned current level work ?

They can't. As noted elsewhere, an employee can be fulfilling all of the performance requirements at the current grade, and even be a great performer, but not necessarily be entitled to a promotion. Changes to the work requirements of the position or the organization to which the position is assigned might affect the opportunity for promotion to a higher grade. Promotions within career ladders are not an automatic entitlement and not every employee will be promoted, necessarily, to the highest grade level. Employees may be promoted, without competition, when work is available, assigned on a regular and recurring basis, satisfactorily performed at the next higher grade level, and all other regulatory requirements are met. If, for whatever reasons, higher graded work is not assigned on regular and recurring basis and satisfactorily performed, a promotion technically cannot be granted. In that situation, a supervisor should be able to explain the reasoning to the employee, as there should be information readily available differentiating the duties required at each grade level. All that said, I think denying career ladder promotions for that reason is the exception, not the norm.
thanks 1 user thanked TheRealOrange for this useful post.
RightGuy45 on 4/21/2017(UTC)
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