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Disability (Rehabilitation Act)


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diannedawn  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, January 02, 2018 4:09:06 PM(UTC)

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If someone has reached their MRA does that mean they can no longer file for a disability retirement under FERS?
frankgonzalez  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, January 03, 2018 4:38:17 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: diannedawn Go to Quoted Post
If someone has reached their MRA does that mean they can no longer file for a disability retirement under FERS?
If you are eligible for a regular retirement, you are not eligible for disability retirement from what I understand of the process.

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
Gup@#_01  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 03, 2018 6:36:54 AM(UTC)
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No, you can reach your MRA and still file for Disability Retirement. I had reached MRA when I filed, and I am now receiving DR. It works to your advantage because when your regular annuity is computed at age 62, they will count each year in between as though you had worked for the Federal Government in your job all along. So, instead of being eligible for a regular annuity at your MRA of say 56 with 25 years of service, you draw DR until age 62, which pays more than a regular annuity would. Then, when you attain age 62, your regular annuity is computed as though you had worked and have the years of service from your MRA of age 56 to age 62. Thus, rather than 25 years of service you had at your MRA of age 56, you have 31 years of service when you regular annuity is computed at age 62. If you believe you meet the criteria for DR, you should definitely apply. It is a lengthy process. You may wish to file for a regular FERS annuity and DR at the same time because your regular annuity will be approved quicker. If your DR is later approved, you can convert your regular annuity to a DR annuity. Also, there are certain deadlines to file for each, not to mention holding on to your FEHB, so filing for both can protect you from failing to meet the timeliness requirements. Good luck!
frankgonzalez  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, January 03, 2018 7:20:12 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Twiggy Go to Quoted Post
No, you can reach your MRA and still file for Disability Retirement. I had reached MRA when I filed, and I am now receiving DR. It works to your advantage because when your regular annuity is computed at age 62, they will count each year in between as though you had worked for the Federal Government in your job all along. So, instead of being eligible for a regular annuity at your MRA of say 56 with 25 years of service, you draw DR until age 62, which pays more than a regular annuity would. Then, when you attain age 62, your regular annuity is computed as though you had worked and have the years of service from your MRA of age 56 to age 62. Thus, rather than 25 years of service you had at your MRA of age 56, you have 31 years of service when you regular annuity is computed at age 62. If you believe you meet the criteria for DR, you should definitely apply. It is a lengthy process. You may wish to file for a regular FERS annuity and DR at the same time because your regular annuity will be approved quicker. If your DR is later approved, you can convert your regular annuity to a DR annuity. Also, there are certain deadlines to file for each, not to mention holding on to your FEHB, so filing for both can protect you from failing to meet the timeliness requirements. Good luck!
Thanks for the correction...the only cases I have seen have been folks 62 and older (at least one was CSRS!) who wanted to go out on DR.

I forget there are folks who start in the fed at a young age and are eligible to retire long before 62!

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
MNMSNUT1  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, February 14, 2018 9:01:04 PM(UTC)

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I have a similar question. I am 60 1/2. is it better to go OPM disability retirement or stay on OWCP
frankgonzalez  
#6 Posted : Thursday, February 15, 2018 4:10:00 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: MNMSNUT1 Go to Quoted Post
I have a similar question. I am 60 1/2. is it better to go OPM disability retirement or stay on OWCP
DR pays 60% of your salary the first year, and 40% the following years. What does OWCP pay?

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
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