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Internal Revenue Service

As a bureau of the Department of the Treasury and as one of the world's most efficient tax administrators, the IRS role is to help the large majority of compliant taxpayers with the tax law, while ensuring that the minority who are unwilling to comply pay their fair share. (Source: www.irs.gov)

This forum will allow you to share and ask job-related questions about this bureau. This is NOT the place to ask tax questions.

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chriswt25  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, February 13, 2018 1:26:08 AM(UTC)
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kayadash  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, February 13, 2018 10:26:50 PM(UTC)
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Question, should we as federal employees still be happy about the booming economy and stock market?
Hired 2015  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, February 14, 2018 5:53:31 AM(UTC)
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Would the seasonals be better off on medicaid? If we go to the blackboard to add up all the insurance premiums, copays, prescriptions and deduct that for the pay many seasonals would have incomes that qualify for the Hoosier medicaid program. Frankly medicaid in many states pays more of the medical bills than FEHB and also offers the benefits of not having to worry about covering FEHB premiums while on furlough. Seasonals that work for a living face the choice of working to eat or to have healthcare. We don't get waivers to access medicaid because we work to pay FEHB, rent and to eat. Too many seasonals are needing food pantry or other community assistance to get by because the FEHB is way too costly.

Private sector seasonal accounting and tax workforce in many parts of the country earn only wages that keep them qualified for medicaid. Healthcare for those workers was taken away in the 80s when stock bonus plans came in that were too costly to participate. Most of the industry seasonal workers were women, poor, living below poverty and on medicaid. The industry has done more to keep them in that lifestyle than advance them into upper incomes. I've known plenty of women in accounting and tax that worked seasonal full time to pay for the healthcare costs their full time job plans didn't cover.
Z52  
#4 Posted : Saturday, February 17, 2018 1:57:50 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: kayadash Go to Quoted Post
Question, should we as federal employees still be happy about the booming economy and stock market?


You are not required to so don’t feel obligated to be happy. You can be anything you want.
LieutenantBlantyre  
#5 Posted : Saturday, February 17, 2018 7:41:45 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: chriswt25 Go to Quoted Post
https://federalnewsradio.com/your-money/2018/02/trump-proposes-pay-freeze-new-and-familiar-retirement-cuts-in-2019-budget/


Well, this has been a messed up week. You know it has been a bad week when I don't look for a cup of soup at all and then spend most of Saturday sleeping as if dealing with symptoms of Depression. It is a small mercy that I'm scheduled on TAC Appointments for Tuesday & Wednesday which means I get to miss the wave of crazies asking about their precious refunds. If they don't want an appointment they get immediate transfers to Advanced Accounts.

The specific cuts proposed for IRS under Taxpayer Services were kinda big. The backroom barracks group ran numbers at Cleveland. Essentially we could meet the cuts if we terminated all W&I functions from the Cincinnati campus (leaving residual SBSE & TEGE functions to be physically relocated) and terminated the Indianapolis & Cleveland call sites. FA falls under the 2A line item while SP & AM fall under 2B where there are high cuts proposed. All BODs and supporting elements are proposed to get cuts in manpower. The chart on page 4 shows under "Filing and Account Services" which is where AM falls that the budget planners want to reduce 2,318 people. The explanation on page 13 says it is going to come out of phones:

Quote:
This decrease is expected to lower the telephone Level of Service from an estimated 75 percent in FY 2018 to 47 percent in FY 2019. This decrease may delay the sorting and shipping of incoming mail within normal mail; delay responses to transcript requests and other paper receipts from taxpayers; and result in seasonal employees being placed into non-work status. Proposed investments in systems and online services will mitigate these effects to some extent.


If we did it by knocking out remotes ranking them from smallest and working our way up to largest by headcount, Indianapolis and Cleveland would still get hit but about five others would too. Buffalo and Puerto Rico are the largest two by AM CSR headcount at the moment. The backroom group tried to force-fit the numbers a couple different directions but it still came out messy. Its rough count of full time remote CSRs is just under 4,900 across all the sites.

The budget justification and raw numbers are here: https://www.treasury.gov/about/b...IRS%20FY%202019%20CJ.pdf

The tl;dr is that AM phones are proposed to be cut while EPSS might get a small staffing boost. Good news for Andover campus apparently.

Edited by user Saturday, February 17, 2018 7:43:19 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Late on a Saturday and me without a date...

LieutenantBlantyre  
#6 Posted : Saturday, February 17, 2018 7:46:33 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Hired 2015 Go to Quoted Post
Would the seasonals be better off on medicaid? If we go to the blackboard to add up all the insurance premiums, copays, prescriptions and deduct that for the pay many seasonals would have incomes that qualify for the Hoosier medicaid program. Frankly medicaid in many states pays more of the medical bills than FEHB and also offers the benefits of not having to worry about covering FEHB premiums while on furlough. Seasonals that work for a living face the choice of working to eat or to have healthcare. We don't get waivers to access medicaid because we work to pay FEHB, rent and to eat. Too many seasonals are needing food pantry or other community assistance to get by because the FEHB is way too costly.

Private sector seasonal accounting and tax workforce in many parts of the country earn only wages that keep them qualified for medicaid. Healthcare for those workers was taken away in the 80s when stock bonus plans came in that were too costly to participate. Most of the industry seasonal workers were women, poor, living below poverty and on medicaid. The industry has done more to keep them in that lifestyle than advance them into upper incomes. I've known plenty of women in accounting and tax that worked seasonal full time to pay for the healthcare costs their full time job plans didn't cover.


I wouldn't worry about either of us still having a job. Neither Cleveland nor Indianapolis is strong enough to rate its own Operations Manager. We're going to be splitting one before 2018 is done possibly. For some reason we keep thinking at Cleveland that Indy will get the Ops manager as the consolation prize for being the smallest call site in the country.
Hired 2015  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:19:52 AM(UTC)
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Years ago the CSR job ads for the midwest centers was hyped in Wisconsin for telework. That created a disappointment when there were no call centers in Wisconsin. Those jobs really didn't have telework options especially to live 500 miles+ from a physical call site. When you put good paying jobs out there in a state having hard times especially before groups like CPA associations and in colleges people will see that under many shades of light. They don't see why they can't work 4 months seasonal from home and remotely train. There is a saying in Wisconsin, let them try. What that means is to move forward you have to make room for people to try their ideas. Don't be fooled by Wisconsin's culture bridges and divides. You come to a divide you build a bridge. Test drive remote training and telework in their neighborhood. Forward, the motto of Wisconsin. They can't complain if they were in charge. Throw a bridge over the divide and let them try. If they fail, well they got dust themselves off and try again. If they can't get up its Wisconsin to offer them a hand out of the divide knowing they refuse the help.
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