Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Training and Certification


Whether you want to improve your skills, boost your resume or prepare for a new job opportunity, training and certification programs and resources can help you achieve your goals. With the right program and resource, you will be more productive and this will help you climb the career ladder.

Here is a forum to ask questions about a particular program, to exchange insight on which is the right training, to share which certifications are the best to attain, to seek out what to do first, and to offer recommendations to others.

To read today's top news stories on federal employee pay, benefits, retirement, job rights and other workplace issues visit FederalDaily.com.
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
ggrimm01  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, February 20, 2018 3:42:32 AM(UTC)

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 3/6/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10

Hello
I have been all over the website for both certs in the subject line. I hope someone can answer or point me in the right direction. Here I go...

I have 17 years of experience, 1 BS degree, MBA in 6 months, and many college credits. Can I use my vast knowledge in procurement & supply chain and put towards either or both certs and get acredited by one or both? How do I go about doing this? I am putting in for 1102 and 346 Gov. Jobs, however they want certification. I am being referred to higher level jobs. I am not looking for step by step detail. I will do that.

Just looking for the right direction. Thank you in advance.
frankgonzalez  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, February 20, 2018 4:47:12 AM(UTC)
frankgonzalez

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/8/2008(UTC)
Posts: 4,901

Thanks: 59 times
Was thanked: 851 time(s) in 673 post(s)
Originally Posted by: ggrimm01 Go to Quoted Post
Hello
I have been all over the website for both certs in the subject line. I hope someone can answer or point me in the right direction. Here I go...

I have 17 years of experience, 1 BS degree, MBA in 6 months, and many college credits. Can I use my vast knowledge in procurement & supply chain and put towards either or both certs and get acredited by one or both? How do I go about doing this? I am putting in for 1102 and 346 Gov. Jobs, however they want certification. I am being referred to higher level jobs. I am not looking for step by step detail. I will do that.

Just looking for the right direction. Thank you in advance.
The experience can be used...once you are in the position and so can get the certification. however, there are also required classes needed to be taken that can only be done as a federal employee.

Edited by user Tuesday, February 20, 2018 4:47:53 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
Beam Reach  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, February 20, 2018 1:18:58 PM(UTC)
Endless Summer

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/7/2016(UTC)
Posts: 473

Thanks: 4 times
Was thanked: 103 time(s) in 93 post(s)
Originally Posted by: ggrimm01 Go to Quoted Post
Hello
I have been all over the website for both certs in the subject line. I hope someone can answer or point me in the right direction. Here I go...

I have 17 years of experience, 1 BS degree, MBA in 6 months, and many college credits. Can I use my vast knowledge in procurement & supply chain and put towards either or both certs and get acredited by one or both? How do I go about doing this? I am putting in for 1102 and 346 Gov. Jobs, however they want certification. I am being referred to higher level jobs. I am not looking for step by step detail. I will do that.

Just looking for the right direction. Thank you in advance.


Your experience and education may get you the job but, at least in the fields I've researched, you cannot substitute experience for the required training courses. also, there are TIG requirements for many of the certification levels above Level 1. For instance FAC-COR level 2 requires that you have served at least 12 months as a COR Level 1. you cannot substitute civilian experience for this.

The good news is that most positions that require certification have a clause like "must attain within 24 months".
DaVinci95  
#4 Posted : Tuesday, February 20, 2018 1:57:46 PM(UTC)
DaVinci95

Rank: Advisor

Groups: Registered
Joined: 5/4/2014(UTC)
Posts: 181
United States

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 43 time(s) in 42 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Beam Reach Go to Quoted Post

Your experience and education may get you the job but, at least in the fields I've researched, you cannot substitute experience for the required training courses. also, there are TIG requirements for many of the certification levels above Level 1. For instance FAC-COR level 2 requires that you have served at least 12 months as a COR Level 1. you cannot substitute civilian experience for this.

The good news is that most positions that require certification have a clause like "must attain within 24 months".


There's not a TIG requirement for DAWIA, but you do have to have the relevant experience. Time in private sector jobs or in Fed jobs not subject to DAWIA can be used to meet the experience requirements.

Also you don't have to have lower level certification to get higher levels. You do have to take all the classes required for the lower levels, but if you have the requisite experience you can jump straight to level 3 certification.
ggrimm01  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, February 20, 2018 4:37:35 PM(UTC)

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 3/6/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10

Thanks these are good things to know.
FedCivServ  
#6 Posted : Monday, March 26, 2018 11:54:09 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 9/9/2013(UTC)
Posts: 1,146

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 157 time(s) in 135 post(s)
You are not speaking for all agencies...mine DOES require individuals to get each concurrent level of certification and i thought that was DAWIA policy in general. The only way to get credit for time "served" outside is to apply for adjudication credit with the agency Defense Acquisition Career Manager (DACM) and it's their final call whether the experience you have outside will be credited toward the time for DAWIA. You do have to take the classes, and each functional stall has specific years required on an acquisition position to get each subsequent level of certification. The "must attain in 24 months" means if you are hired for say, a Level II position, you have 24 months to get certified to that level. In most career fields, to get to Level II it takes 24 months so if you sit on the position and take the training, someone off the street could get Level II in 2 years. Level 3 requires between 4-8 years depending on the area. You can look at the DAWIA statute (just google it) and it tells you all these things.
Frogger  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, May 02, 2018 3:26:06 AM(UTC)
Frogger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 2/1/2017(UTC)
Posts: 371
United States
Location: Ohio

Thanks: 7 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 95 post(s)
The training is mandated by Congress.
DODtoDOCtoDOD  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, July 31, 2018 7:09:01 AM(UTC)
DODtoDOCtoDOD

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/24/2018(UTC)
Posts: 20
Location: Maryland

Thanks: 3 times
Was thanked: 4 time(s) in 4 post(s)
Exactly, if you're in an acquisition coded position you have to be certified; level is dependent on level of responsibility, etc.

I would do DAWIA if possible since it directly translates to the equivalent FAC certification (e.g. DAWIA PM lvl 3 = FAC P/PM lvl 3), but FAC certification doesn't necessarily mean you can get the DAWIA equivalent. The hurdle: I believe you have to be in an acquisition coded position to be given the DAWIA certification even if you meet the education and experience requirements.
Frogger  
#9 Posted : Monday, October 22, 2018 6:27:40 PM(UTC)
Frogger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 2/1/2017(UTC)
Posts: 371
United States
Location: Ohio

Thanks: 7 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 95 post(s)
The MBA is nice to have, but in the contracting field it’s not that helpful. The FAC-C or DAWIA certification is mandatory, but in the long run the job requires a lot of study on your own time. Assuming you want to be the best.
Sean2015  
#10 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2018 12:43:55 PM(UTC)
Sean2015

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/2/2013(UTC)
Posts: 77

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 14 time(s) in 11 post(s)
Contrary to what Frogger said, an MBA is helpful in the Contracting field especially if you're trying to be a GS-13 and above. Maybe 5 years ago one could skirt into a GS-13 position without having an MBA or Masters in Contract Management. Those days are over. Most of the 1101s/1102s being hired under GS-7/11 Recent Grad announcements have an MBA. I'm an 1102 in an area where only D.C. has a larger concentration of 1102s and I've worked for two different agencies. I'm also involved with the local NCMA (National Contract Management Association). The contracting professionals who rise through the ranks fast in the government and private sector seem to always have MBAs to go along with their DAWIA/Private sector certifications (CFCM, CPCM). A few have DBAs but they are all retired military. Government Tuition assistance only covers up to a Masters degree and I know Private companies aren't willing to shell out $60k+ to pay for an employee to get their DBA.

Edited by user Thursday, November 08, 2018 12:52:41 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Rikaku  
#11 Posted : Tuesday, November 20, 2018 8:14:51 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/3/2011(UTC)
Posts: 266

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 21 time(s) in 18 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Sean2015 Go to Quoted Post
Contrary to what Frogger said, an MBA is helpful in the Contracting field especially if you're trying to be a GS-13 and above. Maybe 5 years ago one could skirt into a GS-13 position without having an MBA or Masters in Contract Management. Those days are over. Most of the 1101s/1102s being hired under GS-7/11 Recent Grad announcements have an MBA. I'm an 1102 in an area where only D.C. has a larger concentration of 1102s and I've worked for two different agencies. I'm also involved with the local NCMA (National Contract Management Association). The contracting professionals who rise through the ranks fast in the government and private sector seem to always have MBAs to go along with their DAWIA/Private sector certifications (CFCM, CPCM). A few have DBAs but they are all retired military. Government Tuition assistance only covers up to a Masters degree and I know Private companies aren't willing to shell out $60k+ to pay for an employee to get their DBA.



I have to disagree. True, many new 1102s are coming in with advanced degrees, but that is more of just a discriminator during the hiring process to weed out the tons of resumes received. I know many 1102s with masters and JDs, and other than getting the attention of the hiring official, it really has limited (if any) bearing on promotions, advancements, and ability. In fact, I know many 15s and SES's with just bachelor degrees. Once you get your foot in the door, no one cares about what degree(s) you have or where they are from; from that point on the focus is on what value you are adding, your analytical ability, and accomplishments.
thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
frankgonzalez on 11/20/2018(UTC)
Sean2015  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, November 21, 2018 8:53:02 PM(UTC)
Sean2015

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/2/2013(UTC)
Posts: 77

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 14 time(s) in 11 post(s)
1102s are considered Business advisors for the government when it comes to procurement. Why wouldn’t having a Masters in Business be a plus? When hiring managers start “racking and stacking” resumes for interviews, having an advanced degrees can be the deciding factor between two candidates that have the same experience and certification level. Points are earned based on education. A candidate can earn the maximum education points for having an MBA/Masters in Contracting-Aquisitions, Level 3 in Contracting and level 2 in another series. GS-15’s and SES’s only having a bachelor degree in Contracting will be the thing of the past similar to senior military officers only having bachelor degrees. The few that slip through the cracks will definitely be outliers. I’ve been in many meetings where GS-15’s and SESs are constantly stressing the importance of journeyman contract specialist furthering their education to make themselves competitive if they have aspirations of being Supervisors and above. Even DAU instructors take the time to advise students to take advantage of the educational opportunities in the government. I know a slew of solid GS-12 Contract Specialist with years of experience who are constantly passed over for GS-13 positions. Not having a Masters has been the common thread. When talking to more senior 1102’s about upward career progression, the first two questions I’m asked is, “what is your certification level? and do you have a Masters? I’d recommend anyone who plans on working and riding to the top in the 1102 series in the next 10-20 years to further their education especially when Tuition Assistance is available. It’s checking another box. I live and work in one of the most educated cities in the US and competition for good employment is stiff so I apologize for stressing the importance of being an 1102 with an advanced degree more than others.

Edited by user Thursday, November 22, 2018 4:23:16 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Frogger  
#13 Posted : Wednesday, November 28, 2018 11:46:37 AM(UTC)
Frogger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 2/1/2017(UTC)
Posts: 371
United States
Location: Ohio

Thanks: 7 times
Was thanked: 114 time(s) in 95 post(s)
Sean, I have all the advanced degrees and certifications you referenced. You seem like you are on the right path. I am really only stating that becoming the SME will really be the feather in your cap. I have met a few SES and GS-15s in the 1102 field that made me question my personal career path choices. Anyway, happy holidays.
Sean2015  
#14 Posted : Wednesday, November 28, 2018 1:54:29 PM(UTC)
Sean2015

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 12/2/2013(UTC)
Posts: 77

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 14 time(s) in 11 post(s)
I agree. There’s definitely a shortage of subject matter experts in contracting. The more knowledgeable 1102s are on their way out and sometimes it seems like we rely on attorneys too much. That’s a whole nother thread. Where I’m at, 1102’s jump from agency to agency which can be frustrating for management. But at the end of the day people have to do what’s best for them and their families. Happy Holidays to you too Sir.
Rikaku  
#15 Posted : Monday, December 03, 2018 1:44:11 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/3/2011(UTC)
Posts: 266

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 21 time(s) in 18 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Sean2015 Go to Quoted Post
1102s are considered Business advisors for the government when it comes to procurement. Why wouldn’t having a Masters in Business be a plus? When hiring managers start “racking and stacking” resumes for interviews, having an advanced degrees can be the deciding factor between two candidates that have the same experience and certification level. Points are earned based on education. A candidate can earn the maximum education points for having an MBA/Masters in Contracting-Aquisitions, Level 3 in Contracting and level 2 in another series. GS-15’s and SES’s only having a bachelor degree in Contracting will be the thing of the past similar to senior military officers only having bachelor degrees. The few that slip through the cracks will definitely be outliers. I’ve been in many meetings where GS-15’s and SESs are constantly stressing the importance of journeyman contract specialist furthering their education to make themselves competitive if they have aspirations of being Supervisors and above. Even DAU instructors take the time to advise students to take advantage of the educational opportunities in the government. I know a slew of solid GS-12 Contract Specialist with years of experience who are constantly passed over for GS-13 positions. Not having a Masters has been the common thread. When talking to more senior 1102’s about upward career progression, the first two questions I’m asked is, “what is your certification level? and do you have a Masters? I’d recommend anyone who plans on working and riding to the top in the 1102 series in the next 10-20 years to further their education especially when Tuition Assistance is available. It’s checking another box. I live and work in one of the most educated cities in the US and competition for good employment is stiff so I apologize for stressing the importance of being an 1102 with an advanced degree more than others.


I live in the second most educated city (or first, depending one which list you go by), and became a GS-13 after five years of experience with only a bachelors. How? Experience. Degrees simply have limited impact once you have experience. Degrees matter the most when you are early in your career, but once someone is in their mid to late 20s and has some good experience under their belt, a degree becomes an afterthought.

You stated that if two candidates were identical then the favor would be tipped to the person with the degree. True, but the only time all things are even remotely equal is when someone is just starting out.

I've worked for the largest contracting commands in the federal government, on literally the largest programs, and I can tell you with full confidence that experience is the only thing that matters once you are already in the door. If someone is already in the 1102 series, do focus on getting the certs, but above all make sure you are getting exposure to the critical elements: cost analysis, source selection, and policy. And, sure, get an advanced degree if your job is paying for it, but I personally wouldn't invest the time and money on it otherwise.
Rss Feed  Atom Feed
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.


This page was generated in 1.399 seconds.