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Relocating

Are you considering relocating your federal career - either by your choice or by Uncle Sam? There are practical issues and concerns to think about when deciding whether or not to relocate. Others have done it while still others have not. This forum will allow for all to offer their insight, post their questions, and help each other out.

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JustFedUp  
#1 Posted : Sunday, September 02, 2018 10:41:45 AM(UTC)
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Hello,

I am a GS employee working for a Non-DoD agency in California. Due to recent family events, I started to actively look for a position back in my home state, as I wanted to be closer to my aging, surviving parent. Additionally, I have no real ties to California, and ultimately wish to retire in my home state anyway. I was hired by the Navy for a GS position and have started the relocation process. My plan is to be on a couple of weeks of LWOP to pack and ship my household goods. I can financially do this and prefer to go this route to maintain my 240 hours of carry-over leave. Once my LWOP period is done, I will officially out-process my current agency.

My question is two-fold:

1. Is my rationale logical pertaining to going on LWOP to move as a means to preserve my annual leave?
2. There will be a couple of days in between me out-processing from my old position and my EOD with the Navy. What type of status would I be in?

Thanks in advance!



DaVinci95  
#2 Posted : Sunday, September 02, 2018 2:21:55 PM(UTC)
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Why do you think there is an advantage to using LWOP instead of leave? If you aren't retiring any time soon, you have plenty of opportunity to build it back up to the limit. If you are retiring next year, then the money you gain from the payout is at best a wash with the money you lost on LWOP.

You'll be on the old agency's payroll until the day you transfer to the new agency.
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JustFedUp on 9/3/2018(UTC)
Endless Summer  
#3 Posted : Sunday, September 02, 2018 2:27:49 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: JustFedUp Go to Quoted Post
Hello,

I am a GS employee working for a Non-DoD agency in California. Due to recent family events, I started to actively look for a position back in my home state, as I wanted to be closer to my aging, surviving parent. Additionally, I have no real ties to California, and ultimately wish to retire in my home state anyway. I was hired by the Navy for a GS position and have started the relocation process. My plan is to be on a couple of weeks of LWOP to pack and ship my household goods. I can financially do this and prefer to go this route to maintain my 240 hours of carry-over leave. Once my LWOP period is done, I will officially out-process my current agency.

My question is two-fold:

1. Is my rationale logical pertaining to going on LWOP to move as a means to preserve my annual leave?
2. There will be a couple of days in between me out-processing from my old position and my EOD with the Navy. What type of status would I be in?

Thanks in advance!




I'm going through a similar process now. Non-DoD to DoD and moving states.

The whole handoff was handled between my current agency and the new agency. Very important that there is no gap in employment. One agency releases you on the last day of a pay period typically, and the gaining agency picks you up on the first day of the following pay period. You would be on leave, either paid or unpaid, between the two positions.

I'm not really sure about your question concerning carryover leave, my former agency did not allow us to carry over more than 240 hours.

good luck
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JustFedUp on 9/3/2018(UTC)
JustFedUp  
#4 Posted : Monday, September 03, 2018 8:06:44 AM(UTC)
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Thanks for the feedback!

When it comes to leave, I like to hoard my 240-hours carryover and only burn my use/lose. This was possible since my losing agency front loads annual leave at the start of the year.

You confirmed that the key is to not have a break in service and be on some type of status between agencies. Hopefully, I can out process late in the week and remain on LWOP until I'm picked up by the gaining agency at the beginning of the new pay period.
SanMiguel  
#5 Posted : Monday, September 03, 2018 4:06:02 PM(UTC)
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It shouldn't be an issue to stay on the books with your old agency to ensure no gap in service. I went DHS to Navy and took two weeks off to move. My last effective work day was equipment turn in (cell phone/ID badges/NDA), and I had an electronic timecard that was submitted and approved for the next pay period. Your LWOP should be no different. Make it end on a Friday, report to your new agency on Monday.
FatHappyCat  
#6 Posted : Monday, September 03, 2018 4:58:55 PM(UTC)

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To your first question that's really only something you can answer and depends on if you need the money or not. Here's my 2 cents on the matter: leave on the books is like money in the bank that isn't accumulating interest. Unless you're moving to a position with a significantly higher locality pay or moving to a higher grade, there's no reason not to use leave. Your determination of going on leave or not going should be dependent first on what you want, THEN on available days, not the other way around. Obviously if you don't have the days that's a different story, but it's silly to say something like, well I want to go on this 2 week vacation, but I don't have 240+80 hours yet.

Also consider this example: If you are like most employees with 6 hours per pay period that means you are getting 144 hours a year. Assuming you are a 3 year employee which isn't the case since you have 240 hours, and you take 2x 2-week vacations every year for the next 13 years, you'll be down to 48 hours and start actually INCREASING again because at the 15 year mark you jump to 192 hours a year. Most people almost never gets charged the full 160 hours since they'll mix it in with holidays or take a little less one year or so.

So use your leave...

There won't be a 'couple of days' where you are in between agencies. You are with agency A until you in-process with agency B. There may be days where you feel you may not be owned by anyone but you will be. When I moved to Japan, I was expecting to fly in on a Sunday and in-process on Monday. A typhoon delayed my travel and I did not arrive until Wednesday which seems like Monday and Tuesday no one owned me. However when I came in my new agency took ownership of those days even though I never arrived and haven't checked in yet.
TheRealOrange  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, September 04, 2018 2:48:51 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: FatHappyCat Go to Quoted Post
...because at the 15 year mark you jump to 192 hours a year.

I believe that in a "usual" year of 26 pay periods, you actually earn 208 hours of annual leave per year after 15 years of service when accruing 8 hours per pay period (8 x 26 = 208).
djp  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, September 12, 2018 12:43:52 PM(UTC)

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For over 3 yrs you acrue 6 per pay period then anniversary one you get 10 so it totaks 160 pet year or 20 days. After 15 yrs its 26 days getting 8 hrs per pay period.

Use you leave and dont do lwop.

If you are overseas then you are allowed to carry over more like 360 hrs per year. Some agencies can have certain employees carry over more leave lime medical staff at VAcan carry over 360 who are title 38. admin titke 5 employees have the 240 limit.

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