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fedupfedup  
#1 Posted : Friday, January 24, 2020 8:05:57 PM(UTC)

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I want to know whst happens to FEHB at 65 and retired. Do you keep FEHB and Medicare part B? Or drop one? Does the FEHB price stay the same if you also pay for Medicare part B?
Raoul  
#2 Posted : Friday, January 24, 2020 9:16:06 PM(UTC)

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You don't want to drop FEHB, the govt pays 70% of your premium and the cost is the same for retirees.

A few months before you turn 65 Social Security will send you a notice that you will be enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B.
Part A is free.
Part B is optional, if you do nothing you have Part B. I think it costs about $135 monthly and you are billed quarterly ($405).

If you sign the inclosed card opting out of Part B and mail it in, you will not have Part B.
Then Part A will be your primary insurance and FEHB will become secondary insurance.

If you keep Part B, FEHB is still secondary insurance but only needs to cover costs not covered by A or B.
(For this reason Blue Cross Blue Shield BASIC rebates $800 yearly to those who keep Part B.)
I don't know about the other health plans.

If you decline Part B at age 65, the fee grows as each year passes until it quickly becomes cost prohibitive.
It's a tough call, on Part B at 65.
My dad recommended Part B but then again he wore a belt and suspenders.


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icanzz  
#3 Posted : Friday, January 24, 2020 9:26:36 PM(UTC)
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In the event you are also approved for SSDI....Medicare kicks in after 24months of SSDI payments. Reguardless of age. Not sure how that works for FEHB. But for me it takes me to Medicare/ Tricare for life. At 59.
Citrine  
#4 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 7:19:35 AM(UTC)
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I am not yet medicare age, but my online reading indicates that....



almost everyone keeps their FEHB. a few keep FEHB without medicare.

you can pick an FEHB plan that gives very good combined coverage (combined with medicare).

FEHB costs don't vary with age. FEHB plans include prescription drug coverage. you can change FEHB plans every year to suit your needs.

sounds like a very good combination.

Edited by user Saturday, January 25, 2020 7:20:22 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

old fed  
#5 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 8:46:40 AM(UTC)
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i will just add that part b premiums do vary based on income

https://www.medicare.gov...11579-medicare-costs.pdf
Raoul  
#6 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 9:18:55 AM(UTC)

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Thanks for the link.
Didn't realize the low end had gone up to $144.60 this year.

Retired July 2011
GWPDA  
#7 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 10:28:56 AM(UTC)
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And for those of us turning 65 but still working, you take Part A, keep FEHB and Part B is put on hold UNTIL you retire, without any penalties at all. When you do retire, you have several more months to sign up for Part B, again without penalty. To be noted now that for those born in 1955, full retirement age for Social Security is 66 years and 2 months.
fedupfedup  
#8 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 12:05:02 PM(UTC)

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Thank you all I guess it’s good to find a plan that helps pay for B, right now I have Aetna hmo snd ppo for dental and vision
OUtside  
#9 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 2:55:52 PM(UTC)

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There's lots of additional discussion on this subject in the Medicare and Health Care forum at this web site.

Be sure to read Section 9 of your (or any) FEHB plan to understand how the specific plan works with Medicare as well as how the plan works with subscriber of Medicare age who does not have Medicare.

Be mindful that if you cancel your FEHB plan in retirement, you will not be able to come back to FEHB. One economical option is to enroll in Part B and suspend (do not cancel) your FEHB plan while enrolling in a Medicare Advantage plan (Part C). With FEHB suspended, if you later decide Part C is not for you, you could return to FEHB January following the next open season. But, again, there is no coming back if FEHB is cancelled in retirement.

Suggested clarifications to the above comments would be: Rauol's comment that taking Part A only (without Part B) results in FEHB secondary should be understood to mean that FEHB will be secondary for in hospital care (bc Part A would be primary) but FEHB would be primary for everything else (and there would be no secondary for everything else). Also, icanzz's point relating to SSDI, the way I understand it is, the retiree becomes eligible for Medicare but, similarly as to turning age 65 with FEHB, signing up is optional and the Part B premium must be paid on deciding to enroll. There is also the difference that if the retiree passes on signing up for Part B, he/she can would again be eligible to sign up at age 65 without the penalty for late enrollment.

Edited by user Saturday, January 25, 2020 7:48:39 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Clarification

fedupfedup  
#10 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 3:01:13 PM(UTC)

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Thank you
postalvet  
#11 Posted : Saturday, January 25, 2020 4:00:05 PM(UTC)
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also do not sign up on a spouse's plan.
MATMAN14  
#12 Posted : Monday, January 27, 2020 5:50:40 AM(UTC)

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Remember Never cancel FEHB! Suspend it! Call OPM if you dont know how to do that!
fedupfedup  
#13 Posted : Monday, January 27, 2020 8:22:34 AM(UTC)

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Thanks I’ll never cancel
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