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George Maschke  
#701 Posted : Thursday, February 6, 2020 1:17:31 AM(UTC)
George Maschke

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Originally Posted by: buckaneers Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: George Maschke Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: buckaneers Go to Quoted Post
One doesn't really pass or fail a poly, it's a tool that measures physiological responses to questions and supplements personnel security and investigations.


Actually, one does really pass or fail a polygraph. If you fail, you get blackballed. In polygraph screening, the failing score is called "SR" for "significant reaction." In criminal investigations, it's called "DI" for "deception indicated." But whatever buzzword the federal polygraph community chooses to attach to it, it's still tantamount to "failing."


My understanding is that such a reading is a basis for follow-on actions (i.e. interrogations, futher inquiries, etc.) but won't lead to "failure" in of itself, at least if you're already employed there. There's a reason why it's banned from use in court and the private sector - it can't read minds. The instrument's strength comes from the fact that people believe it to be a magical lie detector when it's really more useful to screen out suspect newcomers and elicit voluntary confessions. Check out James Olson's book, "To Catch a Spy." It goes more into detail about the fallacies of "passing/failing" a polygraph.


Where in To Catch a Spy does Olson discuss any "fallacies" of passing or failing a polygraph? I can't find it. On the contrary, I note that he makes specific mention of various individuals "passing" or "failing" polygraphs:

  • Jonathan Pollard was hired by US Navy intelligence and given a top-secret security clearance despite a failed CIA polygraph...
  • Is it possible to beat the polygraph? Yes, of course. Aldrich Ames "passed" a reinvestigation polygraph even though he had been working for the Russian KGB and SVR for several years....
  • Larry Wu-Tai Chin likewise passed CIA polygraphs during his thirty-plus-year espionage career...
  • Shriver failed the CIA polygraph...
  • We know that Montes was trained in counterpolygraph measures by her Cuban handlers, and she passed a DIA reinvestigation polygraph in 1994.
  • Somehow Eddie [Howard] passed the polygraph.
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    NoStringsAttached  
    #702 Posted : Thursday, February 6, 2020 5:03:16 AM(UTC)
    NoStringsAttached

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    Originally Posted by: George Maschke Go to Quoted Post



  • Nobody cares what you say George, we'd appreciate it if you were not on the NSA section of the forums. Regardless if what you say is true or false, it does not help anyone with their process. On top of that, I would go as far as saying it only hurts people's chance of getting through if they were to read all the things you keep saying. Plus, this is the 2019 thread anyway... Which should be dead to begin with.

    Again, please just get off the NSA section and go bother people elsewhere
    thanks 2 users thanked NoStringsAttached for this useful post.
    GobblyGoops on 2/6/2020(UTC), BatDog123 on 2/6/2020(UTC)
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