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DHS

The Department of Homeland Security has a vital mission: to secure the nation from the many threats we face. This requires the dedication of more than 230,000 employees in jobs that range from aviation and border security to emergency response, from cybersecurity analyst to chemical facility inspector. [Their] duties are wide-ranging, but [their] goal is clear: keeping America safe. (source: www.dhs.gov)

Perhaps you are working for the DHS or interested in working for the DHS. Here is a forum to share your experience with the DHS.

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PSEtoPTF  
#241 Posted : Thursday, May 14, 2020 7:35:25 PM(UTC)
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Do asylum officers go through the training ISO go through?


All Asylum Officers are required to attend and complete the Asylum Officer Basic Training Course (AOBTC), which is a national training course that is specific to asylum adjudications. Instructors for this course are from HQ Asylum Division and field Asylum offices, as well as non-governmental organizations, law schools, and the UNHCR.

ISO BASIC is specific to immigration services officers. It provides the necessary skills and tools to adjudicate cases, interpret the law, understand policies, precedent decisions and legal trends, how to write legal decisions along with teaching non-adversarial interview techniques.

So, to answer your question, both have Basic Training, but the content of the training is different, geared to the specific position.



The ISO basic is mandatory to pass but really has nothing to do with the job an ISO does. Its not bad for a complete overview on immigration, but practically speaking, its a HUGE waste of time and resources. Especially now they made it so hard and have such a high fail rate.


How has to changed to make it more difficult?

Thank you!


Before you could use the search function and search pdfs of all the material. Made the class super easy. Now you don't have any of those tools. All you can bring to the test is your law book and small flip immigration book. Thats it. Students are expected to learn basically the entire immigration structure and law in 6 weeks, tests every week. Its insanity. Last class my wife was in it and the "unofficial" failure rate was 30ish% (according to one of the instructors). Thats huge. What a waste to let that many students get fired over a course that has nothing to do with the actual job.


Do you lose your job if you fail the training or can you be sent to the training again? For as much time and money is spent in the hiring/onboarding process, Background investigations, etc, it seems crazy that a person would automatically be terminated if they don't pass the training, especially since its been modified and is much more difficult due to the lack of the "search" function being permitted during the exam.


Disclaimer: I am speaking for RAIO ADOTP training. Maybe it will be useful for somebody :)
Training was required to pass to keep the position. However, nobody will kick you out of the door right away, you will be given time to find a new job or you could be placed in other positions within the office.
Our training was broken into 2 categories. First was RAIO CT that was completed in house with 2 multiple choice exams. Score required to pass- 70% for both exams. Second, face to face ADOTP at FLETC with mock interview, write up and multiple choice exam. Score required to pass is 70% for all 3 elements. On the mock interview and write up we could use any material that was given to us, on any of the multiple choice exams not a thing was allowed in the room.
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athena79 on 5/15/2020(UTC)
Mike in VT  
#242 Posted : Friday, May 15, 2020 4:08:19 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: G0271 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: oujosh29 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: athena79 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: oujosh29 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: XFed77 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Bros1980 Go to Quoted Post
Do asylum officers go through the training ISO go through?


All Asylum Officers are required to attend and complete the Asylum Officer Basic Training Course (AOBTC), which is a national training course that is specific to asylum adjudications. Instructors for this course are from HQ Asylum Division and field Asylum offices, as well as non-governmental organizations, law schools, and the UNHCR.

ISO BASIC is specific to immigration services officers. It provides the necessary skills and tools to adjudicate cases, interpret the law, understand policies, precedent decisions and legal trends, how to write legal decisions along with teaching non-adversarial interview techniques.

So, to answer your question, both have Basic Training, but the content of the training is different, geared to the specific position.



The ISO basic is mandatory to pass but really has nothing to do with the job an ISO does. Its not bad for a complete overview on immigration, but practically speaking, its a HUGE waste of time and resources. Especially now they made it so hard and have such a high fail rate.


How has to changed to make it more difficult?

Thank you!


Before you could use the search function and search pdfs of all the material. Made the class super easy. Now you don't have any of those tools. All you can bring to the test is your law book and small flip immigration book. Thats it. Students are expected to learn basically the entire immigration structure and law in 6 weeks, tests every week. Its insanity. Last class my wife was in it and the "unofficial" failure rate was 30ish% (according to one of the instructors). Thats huge. What a waste to let that many students get fired over a course that has nothing to do with the actual job.


Do you lose your job if you fail the training or can you be sent to the training again? For as much time and money is spent in the hiring/onboarding process, Background investigations, etc, it seems crazy that a person would automatically be terminated if they don't pass the training, especially since its been modified and is much more difficult due to the lack of the "search" function being permitted during the exam.


In the recent past, they have given the option to step down into an ISOA (GS-5/7) position.

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athena79 on 5/15/2020(UTC)
Mike in VT  
#243 Posted : Friday, May 15, 2020 5:46:07 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: athena79 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Mike in VT Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: oujosh29 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: athena79 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: oujosh29 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: XFed77 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Bros1980 Go to Quoted Post
Do asylum officers go through the training ISO go through?


All Asylum Officers are required to attend and complete the Asylum Officer Basic Training Course (AOBTC), which is a national training course that is specific to asylum adjudications. Instructors for this course are from HQ Asylum Division and field Asylum offices, as well as non-governmental organizations, law schools, and the UNHCR.

ISO BASIC is specific to immigration services officers. It provides the necessary skills and tools to adjudicate cases, interpret the law, understand policies, precedent decisions and legal trends, how to write legal decisions along with teaching non-adversarial interview techniques.

So, to answer your question, both have Basic Training, but the content of the training is different, geared to the specific position.



The ISO basic is mandatory to pass but really has nothing to do with the job an ISO does. Its not bad for a complete overview on immigration, but practically speaking, its a HUGE waste of time and resources. Especially now they made it so hard and have such a high fail rate.


How has to changed to make it more difficult?

Thank you!


Before you could use the search function and search pdfs of all the material. Made the class super easy. Now you don't have any of those tools. All you can bring to the test is your law book and small flip immigration book. Thats it. Students are expected to learn basically the entire immigration structure and law in 6 weeks, tests every week. Its insanity. Last class my wife was in it and the "unofficial" failure rate was 30ish% (according to one of the instructors). Thats huge. What a waste to let that many students get fired over a course that has nothing to do with the actual job.


I partially agree with this. It was ridiculously easily at one point. However, the law book/reference book only method is what it was at one point. Now that IOBTC is back at FLETC full-time again, they probably have to use their standard for testing. With ICE, we had to use not only the law book/flip book only, but clean copies to boot. (i.e. no tabs, highlighted material, etc.)

30% fail rate sounds awfully high.



Thank you both for the information! A few other questions:

1. How large are the classes per session (average)?

2. Besides the USCIS website, is there a way to acquire the reading materials for the classes beforehand? For instance, is the information listed in the e-CFR? (Besides a cursory look through the USCIS site, I haven't dug deep enough anywhere else yet). Or can I buy the textbooks/law books somewhere so I can start studying sooner rather than later?

3. Once issued the EOD, how soon after do we need to go to FLETC for training? During the interview, someone mentioned that I would be trained on-site first before FLETC. At another agency I was with, we were sent to training first before even stepping into the office.

4. What is the criteria to pass/fail FLETC? For instance, in my last agency, we had to pass every test with a minimum of 80%. We were allowed two fails, but had to retake those by the next day and then pass with an 80% (I think). If we failed the same test twice, we were sent home.


1. I think this depends on how quickly they want to get through the backlog of IOBTC trainees. When I went (in Dallas), our class was 216. Though, that was not and is not the norm.
2. You could search for a new edition of the INA, though I wouldn't do any of this. You wouldn't know what you're looking for, as studying the book alone would be out context for what you may need to know for the tests.
3. Again, this could vary based on the student backlog. For me it was 3 months, but it could be up to a year or more. Depending on your location, you will likely receive training at your home office. In most cases (speaking from a service center point of view), you would be trained on adjudicating your form-type and would gain a little bit of experience prior to IOBTC.
4. I believe the passing grade is still 70%.
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athena79 on 5/15/2020(UTC)
HurryUpAndWait29  
#244 Posted : Friday, May 15, 2020 4:37:30 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: athena79 Go to Quoted Post

Thank you both for the information! A few other questions:

1. How large are the classes per session (average)?

2. Besides the USCIS website, is there a way to acquire the reading materials for the classes beforehand? For instance, is the information listed in the e-CFR? (Besides a cursory look through the USCIS site, I haven't dug deep enough anywhere else yet). Or can I buy the textbooks/law books somewhere so I can start studying sooner rather than later?

3. Once issued the EOD, how soon after do we need to go to FLETC for training? During the interview, someone mentioned that I would be trained on-site first before FLETC. At another agency I was with, we were sent to training first before even stepping into the office.

4. What is the criteria to pass/fail FLETC? For instance, in my last agency, we had to pass every test with a minimum of 80%. We were allowed two fails, but had to retake those by the next day and then pass with an 80% (I think). If we failed the same test twice, we were sent home.


I’ll chime in with my recent experience at FLETC BASIC. I went to Charleston towards the end of last year. I received the invitation for the training after 4 months of working.

1) My class had close to 400 students with about 25 students each seminar class. It was a mix of service centers and field office employees.

2) I think my class was the last one to be part of the “control+F” era. Basically it was open-book exams. We were able to use that “find” function to search for the answers in the PDFs, during all four exams. They uploaded the class materials to a specific link that you’ll use during the training. Honestly, there’s no way to prepare for the coursework. It’s specific to the training because the questions and answers are straight from the PDFs. The instructors are required to teach from them, but in PowerPoint format. This made the exams relatively easy. But during my training, a new policy came out with new exam guidelines for the next class. Students would be allowed to only use the immigration law book, links for the policy manual and regulations, and handouts from the instructors. No open-book. It sounds tough now because you’ll be spending time finding the answers for each question. You’ll have about 2 hours to take each exam.

3) I think it varies, but I was notified via email around 4 months of working.

4) For my class, you had to have an average of 70%. So you could possibly fail the first two exams with 69%, but ace the last two exams and pass with an average of 70%. But I think they changed it to passing each test with 70%. I don’t think anyone failed from my class.

I hope this is helpful!
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athena79 on 5/17/2020(UTC)
MGG  
#245 Posted : Saturday, May 16, 2020 6:23:00 AM(UTC)
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Forget about the freeze. We are in RIF territory now (check email sent Friday evening by the Director).
Mike in VT  
#246 Posted : Saturday, May 16, 2020 7:29:43 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: MGG Go to Quoted Post
Forget about the freeze. We are in RIF territory now (check email sent Friday evening by the Director).



Yuppers. It's sad that a once fiscally-sound agency is now in trouble. The biggest reason the agency is in a potential RIF status is mostly due to funds being taken from USCIS and put into ICE/CBP. COVID-19 didn't help the situation.

If we do go to a RIF/furloughed status (which is why I think this 'warning shot' went out), hiring would be on a long-term freeze, those with 15 years or more(?) would be offered buy-outs, the RIF would directly affect those with <3 years. Once things get rolling again with the economy, those who were RIF'd could potentially be come back. Congress and USCIS needs to strongly look at charging for humanitarian-based petitions and applications (this was vaguely referred to in the announcement).
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XFed77 on 5/16/2020(UTC)
daddythedonkey  
#247 Posted : Saturday, May 16, 2020 7:43:45 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Mike in VT Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: MGG Go to Quoted Post
Forget about the freeze. We are in RIF territory now (check email sent Friday evening by the Director).



Yuppers. It's sad that a once fiscally-sound agency is now in trouble. The biggest reason the agency is in a potential RIF status is mostly due to funds being taken from USCIS and put into ICE/CBP. COVID-19 didn't help the situation.

If we do go to a RIF/furloughed status (which is why I think this 'warning shot' went out), hiring would be on a long-term freeze, those with 15 years or more(?) would be offered buy-outs, the RIF would directly affect those with <3 years. Once things get rolling again with the economy, those who were RIF'd could potentially be come back. Congress and USCIS needs to strongly look at charging for humanitarian-based petitions and applications (this was vaguely referred to in the announcement).


Wuhan pandemic and lock downs are what's killing the agency's revenue stream. Period. Offices are closed so applicants aren't applying. Who would pay an application fee when the agency can't process applications? But even if the offices had never closed, applicants would've dwindled anyway. There's so many people who could afford the fees (or taken the risk on them) 3 months ago that can't now and won't anytime soon. And those economic repercussions of Wuhan are going to be felt by the agency for a long time. If CIS offered me a job tomorrow that doubled my current salary, I wouldn't take it.

If you're waiting on the hiring freeze to end, you'll be waiting years. A federal government bailout isn't going to change that. Look elsewhere.
XFed77  
#248 Posted : Saturday, May 16, 2020 8:29:09 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: daddythedonkey Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Mike in VT Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: MGG Go to Quoted Post
Forget about the freeze. We are in RIF territory now (check email sent Friday evening by the Director).



Yuppers. It's sad that a once fiscally-sound agency is now in trouble. The biggest reason the agency is in a potential RIF status is mostly due to funds being taken from USCIS and put into ICE/CBP. COVID-19 didn't help the situation.

If we do go to a RIF/furloughed status (which is why I think this 'warning shot' went out), hiring would be on a long-term freeze, those with 15 years or more(?) would be offered buy-outs, the RIF would directly affect those with <3 years. Once things get rolling again with the economy, those who were RIF'd could potentially be come back. Congress and USCIS needs to strongly look at charging for humanitarian-based petitions and applications (this was vaguely referred to in the announcement).


Wuhan pandemic and lock downs are what's killing the agency's revenue stream. Period. Offices are closed so applicants aren't applying. Who would pay an application fee when the agency can't process applications? But even if the offices had never closed, applicants would've dwindled anyway. There's so many people who could afford the fees (or taken the risk on them) 3 months ago that can't now and won't anytime soon. And those economic repercussions of Wuhan are going to be felt by the agency for a long time. If CIS offered me a job tomorrow that doubled my current salary, I wouldn't take it.

If you're waiting on the hiring freeze to end, you'll be waiting years. A federal government bailout isn't going to change that. Look elsewhere.


I agree with Mike in VT. As a matter of fact, there have been investigations and evidence that USCIS's funds have been diverted to ICE/CBP because the Budget for FY 2020 did not assign the funds that the Trump administration wanted for ICE, CBP, and the Border Patrol, so they diverted the funds from USCIS. This year is an election year and Trump's base is anti-immigration, so they had to appease them. Naming an Anti-Immigration extremist, Ken Cuccinelli, Acting Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security and Acting Principal Deputy Director of the USCIS doesn't help USCIS at all. It's funny how Cuccinelli is such an extremist, besides being Anti-LGBT and an outright Bigot, that even a few Republican Senators wouldn't vote for him to confirm him with a Majority thus he will remain "Acting" for the duration of his term.

And if you are mentioning the COVID-19 to which Trump first denied was a problem; said it was a Hoax, said it would go away by itself, claimed people could be cured by injecting disinfectant to humans, and delayed actions for at least 2 months after he learned of it, it might be a contributing factor but not the main reason. It's mostly politics.

It's a shame that we are supposed to be the most powerful country and we are the country with the most infected and most deaths in the World by far. Embarrassing and Tragic for the 80,000+ Americans who have lost their lives and their families. Blaming others is not gonna cut it. We have the best doctors, best resources, but CHAOTIC leadership, starting at the White House, driven by nonsense. It's a waste.

I have a feeling FY 2021 will be a better one for USCIS. Changes are coming.

Edited by user Saturday, May 16, 2020 8:32:39 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Pumas1234  
#249 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:39:15 AM(UTC)
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lol it has got to the point that it is pretty obvious that this agency sucks
daddythedonkey  
#250 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:55:11 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
lol it has got to the point that it is pretty obvious that this agency sucks


It's not that the agency sucks. But the prospect of getting hired by the agency sucks for at least the next few years. Leave politics out of it. If Wuhan never happened, USCIS isn't having this issue. End of story. And anyone who thinks the repercussions of it will end in the next fiscal year is just burying his head in the sand. I can tell you firsthand that there are USCIS employees who are scouring usajobs and many other employment websites for opportunities right now. And it's not because the agency sucks. It's because the writing is on the wall. An infusion of money from the government will only kick the can down the road. The agency that prides itself on being self-funded through application fees isn't getting out of the woods for a long time. A current employee leaving is exactly what they want budget-wise. Ergo, they won't be replacing that employee. If you're waiting on the the hiring freeze to end or think that the outlook of the agency will change once the next fiscal year begins, then you're delusional.
daddythedonkey  
#251 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 7:11:45 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
im standing by what I said, this agency is absolute trash. Their HR should be the first to go, they dont even know how to respond to emails. ***** them.


Well, they didn't handle the hiring freeze well. But that, seemingly, came out of nowhere. They didn't handle the Wuhan pandemic well either. But, in fairness, the nature of the agency doesn't lend itself to lock downs and such. I mean, they literally can't operate if the offices are closed. And even being open with restrictions is going to hurt the bottom line for them.

But regardless of your opinion, if you're looking to get hired by a federal agency asap (or even w/i the next few years), then writing off USCIS is obvious.
XFed77  
#252 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 7:40:42 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: daddythedonkey Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
lol it has got to the point that it is pretty obvious that this agency sucks


It's not that the agency sucks. But the prospect of getting hired by the agency sucks for at least the next few years. Leave politics out of it. If Wuhan never happened, USCIS isn't having this issue. End of story. And anyone who thinks the repercussions of it will end in the next fiscal year is just burying his head in the sand. I can tell you firsthand that there are USCIS employees who are scouring usajobs and many other employment websites for opportunities right now. And it's not because the agency sucks. It's because the writing is on the wall. An infusion of money from the government will only kick the can down the road. The agency that prides itself on being self-funded through application fees isn't getting out of the woods for a long time. A current employee leaving is exactly what they want budget-wise. Ergo, they won't be replacing that employee. If you're waiting on the the hiring freeze to end or think that the outlook of the agency will change once the next fiscal year begins, then you're delusional.


Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but that's exactly what it is: An opinion. And everyone has one.

No one knows with certainty if it's going to get better or worst.

I remain optimistic that USCIS is going to get out of this, especially if there's a leadership change.

Before the funds were diverted to other agencies, USCIS was doing fine. I worked there and saw the numbers/statistics,
they were doing well.

I like when an immigrant does what he/she has to do, fulfills all requirements, waits his/her turn, & becomes an LPR/Citizen the right way.
I also like to keep the ones who are not worthy, have a criminal history, or cheat, out of our country.

So, because I want to return to work with USCIS, and I'm already in the Federal Government in another position, I can wait.

If working for USCIS is what you want to do, don't get discouraged because individuals come in there with negative comments/views.

However, these comments can have valid assertions: It's true that USCIS is not hiring soon.

This will continue to be a long wait. Hang in there if this is what you really want to do...

If you're needing to get a job in the Federal Government right away, USCIS is not the place at this time.

You can apply to other Agencies for the time being and later on transfer to USCIS.












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jaxberlin on 5/17/2020(UTC), zizzer on 5/18/2020(UTC)
daddythedonkey  
#253 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 7:57:08 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: XFed77 Go to Quoted Post

However, these comments can have valid assertions: It's true that USCIS is not hiring soon.

This will continue to be a long wait. Hang in there if this is what you really want to do...

If you're needing to get a job in the Federal Government right away, USCIS is not the place at this time.

You can apply to other Agencies for the time being and later on transfer to USCIS.


I agree 100%.
XFed77  
#254 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 8:14:35 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: daddythedonkey Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: XFed77 Go to Quoted Post

However, these comments can have valid assertions: It's true that USCIS is not hiring soon.

This will continue to be a long wait. Hang in there if this is what you really want to do...

If you're needing to get a job in the Federal Government right away, USCIS is not the place at this time.

You can apply to other Agencies for the time being and later on transfer to USCIS.


I agree 100%.


Cool! Thank You.

Edited by user Sunday, May 17, 2020 8:27:58 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Mike in VT  
#255 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 10:19:17 AM(UTC)

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I want to quickly correct the assertion that USCIS is not making money because the offices are closed, and if the offices are closed, then no one is going to apply.

You do realize that the vast majority of fees collected and work done is at the service centers, right? Field office operations directorate only works LPR and naturalization applications. Those comprise of a very small amount of work the agency does. Service centers are still open for business, both virtually and physically. What’s keeping the application and petition numbers low is the inability for applicants to physically show up in front of a preparer or attorney. H1Bs are down due to the administration’s current policy. Not placing blame on the administration, just stating facts.

Edited by user Sunday, May 17, 2020 10:20:22 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Pumas1234  
#256 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 10:38:29 AM(UTC)
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the only positive about this is that it really is a great learning experience. I have never been involved in a hiring process like this, and it has been a nightmare since last summer, while only getting worse as time has gone on. I do know I want to work for the fed gov., but will only be applying to agencies funded by taxpayer money from here on out. Regardless of your politics, this agency is being held hostage by the administration. Hopefully it works out but like I said, the next time you get a TO from the gov, it cant be worse than this!
daddythedonkey  
#257 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 1:23:41 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
the only positive about this is that it really is a great learning experience. I have never been involved in a hiring process like this, and it has been a nightmare since last summer, while only getting worse as time has gone on. I do know I want to work for the fed gov., but will only be applying to agencies funded by taxpayer money from here on out. Regardless of your politics, this agency is being held hostage by the administration. Hopefully it works out but like I said, the next time you get a TO from the gov, it cant be worse than this!


Again, leave the politics out of it. It muddies the waters. Bottom line is the agency isn't going to be hiring for a long time. It's important that people reading this forum understand that. If you just want a federal job, you have plenty of other options. If you want to work for USCIS specifically, be prepared to wait years. And, more importantly, have a plan B.
XFed77  
#258 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 1:54:32 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: daddythedonkey Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
the only positive about this is that it really is a great learning experience. I have never been involved in a hiring process like this, and it has been a nightmare since last summer, while only getting worse as time has gone on. I do know I want to work for the fed gov., but will only be applying to agencies funded by taxpayer money from here on out. Regardless of your politics, this agency is being held hostage by the administration. Hopefully it works out but like I said, the next time you get a TO from the gov, it cant be worse than this!


Again, leave the politics out of it. It muddies the waters. Bottom line is the agency isn't going to be hiring for a long time. It's important that people reading this forum understand that. If you just want a federal job, you have plenty of other options. If you want to work for USCIS specifically, be prepared to wait years. And, more importantly, have a plan B.


Sometimes it's hard for people to leave politics out if they have average intelligence/awareness, because you realize that the actions of an administration towards the Agency that you want to work in are detrimental to it's existence and your job prospects. Taking funds from the Agency that generates the funds, the Immigration Benefits granting Agency, USCIS, and telling it that it's budget has constraints, to fund the Immigration Enforcement agencies that don't generate their funds, for political reasons, leaves you with a bad taste and at the least, resentment. It's like adding insult to injury. The aforementioned enforcement agencies increased their hiring while USCIS had a freeze. Like when you work for a private company and they get a new employee that the boss likes, and they decrease your hours, tell you they have financial challenges, but they give the hours to the other person, even though you are the one making the company more money.

You can't control how people feel and can't order them to just shut up and take it. People vent.

daddythedonkey  
#259 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 2:05:17 PM(UTC)
daddythedonkey

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Originally Posted by: Mike in VT Go to Quoted Post
I want to quickly correct the assertion that USCIS is not making money because the offices are closed, and if the offices are closed, then no one is going to apply.

You do realize that the vast majority of fees collected and work done is at the service centers, right? Field office operations directorate only works LPR and naturalization applications. Those comprise of a very small amount of work the agency does. Service centers are still open for business, both virtually and physically. What’s keeping the application and petition numbers low is the inability for applicants to physically show up in front of a preparer or attorney. H1Bs are down due to the administration’s current policy. Not placing blame on the administration, just stating facts.


The agency itself said that it is appealing for a government bailout because applications are way down due to the inability of potential applicants to pay application fees. What I said was that even people who could still afford the fees aren't applying because they know the operation is at a standstill. Hence, being able to show up in front of a preparer or attorney makes no difference.

The agency is asking for an immediate bailout just to make payroll. The argument that it is due to money supposedly being diverted to other agencies is pointless. Though, again, if the Wuhan pandemic never happened then the agency wouldn't be looking for a bailout.

But in the end, the reason doesn't matter. The reality is that the agency is on the verge of, essentially, laying off employees. I hope people checking this forum for a status on the hiring freeze really understand this: THE AGENCY IS ON THE VERGE OF NOT BEING ABLE TO MAKE PAYROLL. And a bailout would only be a short term solution. The economic effects of Wuhan and lock downs are going to be felt by the agency for far longer.

USCIS will not be hiring for a long time. Giving people on this forum false hope about that is irresponsible.
daddythedonkey  
#260 Posted : Sunday, May 17, 2020 2:09:22 PM(UTC)
daddythedonkey

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Originally Posted by: XFed77 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: daddythedonkey Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Pumas1234 Go to Quoted Post
the only positive about this is that it really is a great learning experience. I have never been involved in a hiring process like this, and it has been a nightmare since last summer, while only getting worse as time has gone on. I do know I want to work for the fed gov., but will only be applying to agencies funded by taxpayer money from here on out. Regardless of your politics, this agency is being held hostage by the administration. Hopefully it works out but like I said, the next time you get a TO from the gov, it cant be worse than this!


Again, leave the politics out of it. It muddies the waters. Bottom line is the agency isn't going to be hiring for a long time. It's important that people reading this forum understand that. If you just want a federal job, you have plenty of other options. If you want to work for USCIS specifically, be prepared to wait years. And, more importantly, have a plan B.


Sometimes it's hard for people to leave politics out if they have average intelligence/awareness, because you realize that the actions of an administration towards the Agency that you want to work in are detrimental to it's existence and your job prospects. Taking funds from the Agency that generates the funds, the Immigration Benefits granting Agency, USCIS, and telling it that it's budget has constraints, to fund the Immigration Enforcement agencies that don't generate their funds, for political reasons, leaves you with a bad taste and at the least, resentment. It's like adding insult to injury. The aforementioned enforcement agencies increased their hiring while USCIS had a freeze. Like when you work for a private company and they get a new employee that the boss likes, and they decrease your hours, tell you they have financial challenges, but they give the hours to the other person, even though you are the one making the company more money.

You can't control how people feel and can't order them to just shut up and take it. People vent.



Again, to those reading this forum and hoping for the hiring freeze to end or to be hired anytime soon by the agency: Neither is going to happen. Ignore the political venting that doesn't matter when it comes to the reality of the situation.
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