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Lifeisahighway  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, August 11, 2020 3:47:07 PM(UTC)
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Someone told me 12-18 months...2 years ago that is. Anyone have any recent experience or knowledge on how long they are taking now?
frankgonzalez  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, August 12, 2020 3:20:58 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Lifeisahighway Go to Quoted Post
Someone told me 12-18 months...2 years ago that is. Anyone have any recent experience or knowledge on how long they are taking now?
Depends on where you live and what you are appealing. DC and the 9th Circuit are two of the longest waits, and some places with fewer federal employees are quicker.

Appealing a mixed case after it has been through the MSPB? A little faster. Appealing an EEOC AJ decision or FAD to OFO? A little longer.

Also, the complexity of the case can drive the timeline. A simple, clean claim/issue may be processed faster as a decision is easier and that can be closed out and decrease the backlog (ie initially dismissed due to timeliness, OFO confirmed and now you are appealing that decision? Could be very quick as the facts for that decision are easy to review and make a decision on--more than likely concurring with the previous decision). Really complicated cases...may be a while.

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
Lifeisahighway  
#3 Posted : Friday, August 14, 2020 10:52:34 AM(UTC)
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Thank you! Mine is an EEOC AJ appeal - the Govt is appealing my win, and I’m guessing it is complicated...failure to provide accommodations and a question on if “Emergency Essential (EE)” duties are considered the essential job duties or not. I’m feeling relatively (or as relative as one can get with this was of a system) that the Govt is just trying to see if they can argue their case a second time, mainly because they failed miserably at trying to come up with any actual justification for their actions other than “oops, we forgot to order it”. I’m now on year 8 of my ordeal....forever optimistic to see money before Covid finds me hunkering down and hiding from all the blatant discrimination out there.
frankgonzalez  
#4 Posted : Monday, August 17, 2020 3:48:28 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Lifeisahighway Go to Quoted Post
Thank you! Mine is an EEOC AJ appeal - the Govt is appealing my win, and I’m guessing it is complicated...failure to provide accommodations and a question on if “Emergency Essential (EE)” duties are considered the essential job duties or not. I’m feeling relatively (or as relative as one can get with this was of a system) that the Govt is just trying to see if they can argue their case a second time, mainly because they failed miserably at trying to come up with any actual justification for their actions other than “oops, we forgot to order it”. I’m now on year 8 of my ordeal....forever optimistic to see money before Covid finds me hunkering down and hiding from all the blatant discrimination out there.
Cases like yours make the system look bad. I would guess at the agency as some are notorious in the EEO world for doing this (screwing up an RA and then trying to find some way to justify the screw up vs simply taking their lumps and simply not doing it again) but it is your story to tell not mine!

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
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33years_here on 9/5/2020(UTC)
Lifeisahighway  
#5 Posted : Monday, August 17, 2020 9:01:16 AM(UTC)
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If you guessed the Army, I would give you a shiny new penny. They don’t know how to admit they made a mistake - even attempted to say it was my own fault because I “am a hard worker, and this overworked” myself Into a permanent disability. I’m not Kidding. I had to sit in trial and listen to a Army Colonel lie straight to my face and claim that she “had no idea” my condition was deteriorating because I was doing repetitive movements with my hands...I worked in the office next to hers, and kept showing her how inflamed my hand was.

In addition, the Human Resource GS-13 responsible for ordering it somehow got “confused” and thought I should have ordered the accommodations for myself. I’m still not sure how to explain that one - the AJ didn’t believe her either, and called her an uncredible witness. So between the clueless boss and the incompetent HR, the Army didn’t really have a leg to stand on. They tried unsuccessfully to blame the victim as their defense strategy, and since that didn’t work, they claim the AJ “made a mistake” by considering me a qualified applicant since I could perform Emergency essential duties (only required during an Actual Emergency, which was not the situation when this all occurred).

I tried, unsuccessfully, to negotiate a settlement three (!!!) separate times. The last time, the AJ (who was the negotiater) even pointed out that I would have a 1% chance to prevail - but ended up calling the negotiations off when the Army tried to LOWER their original offer because they felt I was “just bitter” and should only get $30K - $10k “inconvenience compensation” for each month I had to wait for the accommodations. Yes - that’s what they said.

I know not to count my chickens before they hatch. I realize I may never see a dime - but I’m going to take the win anyways. I got a significant non-pecuniary award, my significant medical bills, my legal fees and all back pay awarded. By the time the appeal gets decided, who knows what the grand total will be - but as it stands, it’s getting close to the $1M Mark before deductions.

All this - for a $500 accommodation order. A talk to type program, ergonomic keyboard and Foot rest. The DoD has a centrally funded accommodation program that paid for most of it. So that $500 order is costing the American Taxpayers well over $1.5M by the time you calculate in their costs for keeping this facade going. So I’m sickened by this whole thing on many levels - physically permanently disabled, living with a degenerate condition, mentally & emotionally exhausted with diagnosed depression and PTSD from this, financially drained by 8 years of mounting legal fees, and spiritually downtrodden because of the sheer waste of time, energy and money because of the Army Attitude that it’s more important to save face then do the job right. Rant over; thanks for listening!
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33years_here on 9/5/2020(UTC)
Lifeisahighway  
#6 Posted : Monday, August 17, 2020 9:06:47 AM(UTC)
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If you guessed the Army, I would give you a shiny new penny. They don’t know how to admit they made a mistake - even attempted to say it was my own fault because I “am a hard worker, and this overworked” myself Into a permanent disability. I’m not Kidding. I had to sit in trial and listen to a Army Colonel lie straight to my face and claim that she “had no idea” my condition was deteriorating because I was doing repetitive movements with my hands...I worked in the office next to hers, and kept showing her how inflamed my hand was.

In addition, the Human Resource GS-13 responsible for ordering it somehow got “confused” and thought I should have ordered the accommodations for myself. I’m still not sure how to explain that one - the AJ didn’t believe her either, and called her an uncredible witness. So between the clueless boss and the incompetent HR, the Army didn’t really have a leg to stand on. They tried unsuccessfully to blame the victim as their defense strategy, and since that didn’t work, they claim the AJ “made a mistake” by considering me a qualified applicant since I could not perform Emergency essential duties (only required during an Actual Emergency, which was not the situation when this all occurred).

I tried, unsuccessfully, to negotiate a settlement three (!!!) separate times. The last time, the AJ (who was the negotiater) even pointed out that I would have a 1% chance to prevail - but ended up calling the negotiations off when the Army tried to LOWER their original offer because they felt I was “just bitter” and should only get $30K - $10k “inconvenience compensation” for each month I had to wait for the accommodations. Yes - that’s what they said.

I know not to count my chickens before they hatch. I realize I may never see a dime - but I’m going to take the win anyways. I got a significant non-pecuniary award, my significant medical bills, my legal fees and all back pay awarded. By the time the appeal gets decided, who knows what the grand total will be - but as it stands, it’s getting close to the $1M Mark before deductions.

All this - for a $500 accommodation order. A talk to type program, ergonomic keyboard and Foot rest. The DoD has a centrally funded accommodation program that paid for most of it. So that $500 order is costing the American Taxpayers well over $1.5M by the time you calculate in their costs for keeping this facade going. So I’m sickened by this whole thing on many levels - physically permanently disabled, living with a degenerative condition, mentally & emotionally exhausted with diagnosed depression and PTSD from this, financially drained by 8 years of mounting legal fees, and spiritually downtrodden because of the sheer waste of time, energy and money because of the Army Attitude that it’s more important to save face then do the job right. Rant over; thanks for listening!
frankgonzalez  
#7 Posted : Monday, August 17, 2020 10:24:36 AM(UTC)
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Yep...I was thinking DOD as a possibility. They don't consider disability very often as they think everyone should be "fit to fight". They forget civilians aren't required to meet military fitness standards.

Heck...the new US Coast Guard HQ failed to meet Architectural Barriers Act and ADA/Rehab Act requirements when the Coast Guard moved in, and the presumption was the military doesn't need to meet those requirements! After arguing with the GSA for almost a year, they finally brought in the actual Architects who confirmed everything we wrote up! Now they have to spend 100s of thousands of $ fixing the failures that would have not increased the cost during the actual build...

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
rebels8  
#8 Posted : Thursday, February 11, 2021 12:43:26 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Depends on where you live and what you are appealing. DC and the 9th Circuit are two of the longest waits, and some places with fewer federal employees are quicker.

Appealing a mixed case after it has been through the MSPB? A little faster. Appealing an EEOC AJ decision or FAD to OFO? A little longer.





I've read other places that appealing a FAD to OFO can take at least 5-6 months. Does that sound about right?
#MMlivesmatter
GWPDA  
#9 Posted : Thursday, February 11, 2021 3:39:08 PM(UTC)
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Who's going to explain that a final, successful order takes between 12-15 years? Frank? Or that, btw, the irregularity of the initial order can come back to bite you 25 years later?

Good luck. Don't count your chickens.
frankgonzalez  
#10 Posted : Friday, February 12, 2021 4:16:35 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: rebels8 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Depends on where you live and what you are appealing. DC and the 9th Circuit are two of the longest waits, and some places with fewer federal employees are quicker.

Appealing a mixed case after it has been through the MSPB? A little faster. Appealing an EEOC AJ decision or FAD to OFO? A little longer.





I've read other places that appealing a FAD to OFO can take at least 5-6 months. Does that sound about right?
OFO is usually pretty quick (relatively speaking!).

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
frankgonzalez  
#11 Posted : Friday, February 12, 2021 4:23:14 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: GWPDA Go to Quoted Post
Who's going to explain that a final, successful order takes between 12-15 years? Frank? Or that, btw, the irregularity of the initial order can come back to bite you 25 years later?

Good luck. Don't count your chickens.
All depends on the case. Lots of appeals..can be decades (I recall getting a final order on a case we had in our files that was over 20 years old. My boss remembered when the complaint was filed, but he was the only one in the office who was there back then. In that case, the complainant lost at every stage and kept fighting all the way until SCOTUS denied cert). Most can be done in less than 5 years (again, depends on the case), and if there are no appeals, can be implemented fairly quickly.

Settlements that have poor language can screw either side...as the whole thing can end up be tossed years later when one side (usually the agency) does something the other side (usually the complainant) thinks violates the agreement. Then it gets looked at carefully and if there is anything messed up, the whole thing can unravel quickly.

Of course, this can be true of any type of litigation decision.
You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
idealist2cynicist  
#12 Posted : Thursday, March 4, 2021 12:35:03 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Lifeisahighway Go to Quoted Post
Someone told me 12-18 months...2 years ago that is. Anyone have any recent experience or knowledge on how long they are taking now?



From the many, many appellate decisions I've read over past few years, the OFO typically takes between one and two years to decide appeals, though some straightforward, less complex cases take a few months while a handful of cases can exceed two years (most OFO appellate decisions are publicly available via https://www.eeoc.gov/fed...ctor/appellate-decisions)...


My attorney told me OFO turns around some super basic cases (e.g., when agencies dismiss EEO complaints outright at the outset on clearly erroneous grounds, which happens frequently) within a couple of weeks, though such quick turnarounds are rare based on their experience and from what I've ascertained reading cases myself... @frankgonzalez was correct that the more complex the case, the longer they take (like my pending appeal, which I "won" on liability/discrimination, but which was a total joke on remedies and damages awarded and the appeal is complex )...


OFO in general does take longer than federal courts alas... and the depth of legal analyses and quality of written decisions by OFO civil service appellate attorneys also varies dramatically from one OFO attorney to the next, where all such attorneys are anonymous and operate opaquely, unlike judges in federal district and circuit courts who basically all sign decisions in their names (though flipside of going through EEOC/OFO rather than fed court is it's cheaper, somewhat less likely to be tossed out than in fed court, and much easier for complainant/plaintiff to remain anonymous if case circumstances are very personal/embarrassing).


You can also check the general status of your appeal by logging into the public portal and see whether the status has changed from "complaint file received" (the status that my case has been stuck at for months) to "Appeal Being Processed", which means the case has (finally) been assigned to an OFO appellate attorney to decide, and a decision is then somewhat closer to being issued...


@Lifeisahighway, is your appeal still pending?

Edited by user Thursday, March 4, 2021 9:18:05 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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rebels8 on 3/4/2021(UTC)
rebels8  
#13 Posted : Thursday, March 4, 2021 2:24:29 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: idealist2cynicist Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Lifeisahighway Go to Quoted Post
Someone told me 12-18 months...2 years ago that is. Anyone have any recent experience or knowledge on how long they are taking now?



From the many, many appellate decisions I've read over past few years, the OFO typically takes between one and two years to decide appeals, though some straightforward, less complex cases take a few months while a handful of cases can exceed two years (most OFO appellate decisions are publicly available via https://www.eeoc.gov/fed...ctor/appellate-decisions)...


My attorney told me OFO turns around some super basic cases (e.g., when agencies dismiss EEO complaints outright at the outset on clearly erroneous grounds, which happens frequently) within a couple of weeks, though such quick turnarounds are rare based on her experience and from what I've ascertained reading cases myself... @frankgonzalez was correct that the more complex the case, the longer they take (like my pending appeal, which I "won" on liability/discrimination in a decision without a hearing, but which was a total joke on remedies and damages awarded and the appeal, which I filed rather than the Agency, is a complex beast)...


OFO in general does take longer than federal courts alas... and the depth of legal analyses and quality of written decisions by OFO civil service appellate attorneys also varies dramatically from one OFO attorney to the next, where all such attorneys are anonymous and operate opaquely, unlike judges in federal district and circuit courts who basically all sign decisions in their names (though flipside of going through EEOC/OFO rather than fed court is it's cheaper, somewhat less likely to be tossed out than in fed court, and much easier for complainant/plaintiff to remain anonymous if case circumstances are very personal/embarrassing).


You can also check the general status of your appeal by logging into the public portal and see whether the status has changed from "complaint file received" (the status that my case has been stuck at for several months thus far) to "Appeal Being Processed", which means the case has (finally) been assigned to an OFO appellate attorney to decide, and a decision is then somewhat closer to being issued (in rare instances, the EEOC commissioners, now a majority of whom are employer-defense Trump appointees, decide appeals directly, which is what I fear happened with my appeal based on unique issues posed)...


@Lifeisahighway, is your appeal still pending?


Why does OFO usually take one to two years to decide appeals? Because I read that OFO attorneys normally don't conduct another investigation, such as by interviewing witnesses, unless the motive for the allegedly discriminatory employer action is in question. OFO attorneys normally only rely on the documents produced previously during the agency investigation as well as the appeal statements by the complainant and the agency. Is the long length of time to decide appeals due to the OFO being overworked and understaffed?
#MMlivesmatter
frankgonzalez  
#14 Posted : Thursday, March 4, 2021 4:11:20 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: rebels8 Go to Quoted Post
Why does OFO usually take one to two years to decide appeals? Because I read that OFO attorneys normally don't conduct another investigation, such as by interviewing witnesses, unless the motive for the allegedly discriminatory employer action is in question. OFO attorneys normally only rely on the documents produced previously during the agency investigation as well as the appeal statements by the complainant and the agency. Is the long length of time to decide appeals due to the OFO being overworked and understaffed?
Looks like you already know the answer.
Yes, they are understaffed and there are a lot of complaints that flow through them for one reason or another.

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
idealist2cynicist  
#15 Posted : Sunday, March 7, 2021 12:08:13 AM(UTC)
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It's partly because the OFO is understaffed, as @frankgonzalez stated. But it's also because they have poor case management systems and poor triaging of cases (e.g., prioritizing cases where the most severe outcomes are alleged, from extreme sexual harassment to termination/separation cases over "less severe" cases like those alleging unfair performance reviews, etc). The OFO and EEOC also seem to have incompetent staff and/or are not truly committed to enforcing the rule of law and/or the EEOC's supposed equal employment mission, based on my experience and exchanges with the AJ and staff at the EEOC district office concerning my case (which I "won" on the merits, but which was entirely a pyrrhic victory with no real remedies/damages)...


But REGARDLESS of the underlying causes of such delays, the fact that the EEOC takes *SO* LONG to finish adjudicating cases and appeals-- very commonly well over five years from initiating an EEO complaint to the OFO appellate decision being issued (on cases that were accepted at outset and not dismissed)-- certainly contributes to making the US a third-world country (with corresponding lack of trust in government and the rule of law) compared to other OECD/developed countries such as Canada, Western Europe, Australia, and NZ etc.


I have close friend who moved to the US from India after college and still has most family and friends back in India, who insists that similar litigation in India, with its ~1.4 billion people, moves somewhat more speedily than here in US, after seeing what's happened with the delays of my EEO case...
Even developing countries such as Kenya put US to shame. See case referenced below for a total four-year process from start to finish in a sex discrimination case in Kenya, and the poignant analysis of the court in awarding remedies.


Regardless, the EEOC-- from AJs through the OFO-- urgently needs to get its act together if federal officials want to restore the American public's trust in government and the rule of law. Justice delayed REALLY IS justice denied, especially in the employment context. PLEASE SPEAK OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND TO YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS REGARDING THIS ISSUE-- even if anonymously.



Reference:

http://kenyalaw.org/caselaw/cases/view/181002 (see paragraphs 26 to 29 for poignant analyses concerning justice).

Edited by user Sunday, March 7, 2021 12:30:18 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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rebels8 on 3/7/2021(UTC)
rebels8  
#16 Posted : Sunday, March 7, 2021 1:01:46 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: idealist2cynicist Go to Quoted Post
It's partly because the OFO is understaffed, as @frankgonzalez stated. But it's also because they have poor case management systems and poor triaging of cases (e.g., prioritizing cases where the most severe outcomes are alleged, from extreme sexual harassment to termination/separation cases over "less severe" cases like those alleging unfair performance reviews, etc). The OFO and EEOC also seem to have incompetent staff and/or are not truly committed to enforcing the rule of law and/or the EEOC's supposed equal employment mission, based on my experience and exchanges with the AJ and staff at the EEOC district office concerning my case (which I "won" on the merits, but which was entirely a pyrrhic victory with no real remedies/damages)...


But REGARDLESS of the underlying causes of such delays, the fact that the EEOC takes *SO* LONG to finish adjudicating cases and appeals-- very commonly well over five years from initiating an EEO complaint to the OFO appellate decision being issued (on cases that were accepted at outset and not dismissed)-- certainly contributes to making the US a third-world country (with corresponding lack of trust in government and the rule of law) compared to other OECD/developed countries such as Canada, Western Europe, Australia, and NZ etc.


I have close friend who moved to the US from India after college and still has most family and friends back in India, who insists that similar litigation in India, with its ~1.4 billion people, moves somewhat more speedily than here in US, after seeing what's happened with the delays of my EEO case...
Even developing countries such as Kenya put US to shame. See case referenced below for a total four-year process from start to finish in a sex discrimination case in Kenya, and the poignant analysis of the court in awarding remedies.


Regardless, the EEOC-- from AJs through the OFO-- urgently needs to get its act together if federal officials want to restore the American public's trust in government and the rule of law. Justice delayed REALLY IS justice denied, especially in the employment context. PLEASE SPEAK OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND TO YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS REGARDING THIS ISSUE-- even if anonymously.



Reference:

http://kenyalaw.org/caselaw/cases/view/181002 (see paragraphs 26 to 29 for poignant analyses concerning justice).


Is the OFO's poor triaging of cases simply a matter of incompetence and bureaucratic inefficiency? Or is it actually a way to discourage people from filing anti-discrimination complaints and appeals against the federal government? How much does federal human resources and personnel management policy influence EEO complaints and OFO appeals? I know that the previous administration aimed to make it easier to fire federal employees

Because unfair performance reviews should definitely be a lower priority. At worst, unfair performance reviews normally just prevent people from being promoted. Unfair performance reviews don't necessarily hinder people's jobs or cause them to get fired.
#MMlivesmatter
idealist2cynicist  
#17 Posted : Sunday, March 7, 2021 2:59:07 AM(UTC)
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@rebels8, I'm not sure if my last post was clear based on your reply...


Alas the OFO & EEOC do *NOT* currently triage/prioritize cases for quicker adjudication based on the severity of the harms/incidents alleged in cases-- ALAS they do *NOT* routinely prioritize cases where the incidents at issue were, say, severe sexual harassment (where the RMO is still in his position) and/or where discriminatory terminations/ loss of employment occurred, where delays in adjudication themselves perpetuate and compound the underlying harm. They often do adjudicate cases where the alleged harm/incidents is/are relatively less severe more quickly than cases involving more severe outcomes at issue.


I'm not sure I understood your latter point... If they're deliberately delaying the adjudication of any *LEGITIMATE* EEO complaints-- where complainants set forth prima facia cases of discrimination with facts and evidence showing that the terms of employment were altered (e.g. sexual harassment, termination, failure to hire, etc) based on discrimination, the EEOC if it's acting as a legitimate agency pursuing it's mission, should NOT be dissuading legitimate EEO complaints by taking forever to adjudicate them.


Of course, the EEOC *SHOULD* dismiss cases that are frivolous-- complaints that do not set forth basic facts supporting a claim of *actual* discrimination, and where the conditions of employment were altered as a result of said discrimination. But dissuading-- and/or delaying resolution of-- VALID eeo cases, especially where complainants have demonstrated severe harm as a result of discrimination and where delays in adjudication compound the underlying harm, makes the EEOC a joke, contributes to undermining public trust in government institutions and the rule of law, and weakens the US supposed status as a developed democracy rather than a banana republic.
Lifeisahighway  
#18 Posted : Sunday, March 7, 2021 4:42:45 AM(UTC)
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As of today - still not a peep. I’m on month 14 - just read that the EEOC director got fired, could this be the start of change?

https://www.wsj.com/arti...eral-counsel-11614983850

In the meantime, I sent a letter to the Office of the President last month asking for some transparency in the process...the only way I know to fight for my rights is to KEEP FIGHTING. I have nothing to lose after all...money that may never materialize until after my disability kills me is not money at all. Right now - I’m fighting to stay alive, and figured this is as good a reason as any to keep fighting. Maybe that money could help me find a cure...so I fight to keep my hopes up that one day I will see grandkids.

Any other “radical” ideas to get some insight I to my appeal status? Time is ticking for me...
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rebels8 on 3/7/2021(UTC)
idealist2cynicist  
#19 Posted : Sunday, March 7, 2021 12:49:44 PM(UTC)
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@Lifeisahighway, have you seen my post above from several days ago about EEOC/OFO timeframes, and how to get some sense about your appeal's general status from the EEOC portal?


Biden did NOT fire the EEOC Director (there is no one EEOC director, like there is a CIA director; there are 5 EEOC commissioners, one of whom is designated the chair, Charlotte Burrows). Biden fired Trump’s EEOC General Counsel, Sharon Fast-Gustafson, but the EEOC GC doesn’t have that much to do directly with the federal sector EEO process.


While Democrat Charlotte Burrows (Obama appointee) is the official EEOC “chair”, Trump's 3 commissioners STILL hold the majority on the Commission and can thus block any employee-friendly changes from actually being adopted. (The commissioners vote on new EEOC rules, regs, and even the unusual OFO appeal.)


The UNOFFICIAL "head" at the EEOC is Trump appointee Janet Dhillon, who is VERY ANTI employee-rights. But to her (very partial) credit, her “leadership” actually SLIGHTLY reduced the delays of old EEOC OFO appeals (though that doesn’t offset all the anti-employee moves she adopted)...


DO CONTINUE writing to POTUS, members of Congress, and journalists. AND make lots of noise on Twitter about the dysfunction and opacity at the EEOC—even if anonymously to prevent consequences from your fed supervisors. If you want to write to elected officials, I'd recommend writing to Carolyn Maloney because she's the chair of the Oversight Committee (Maloney has also shown more interest before she became Oversight chair on federal employment and disability issues). If you want to write her, I'd be happy to give feedback on a draft letter.


The EEOC is a critical agency. What happens at the EEOC— even with federal sector EEO cases— directly affects employee rights NATIONWIDE. Last year’s landmark Bostock case at SCOTUS was significantly informed by an earlier federal sector EEO case, where the commission had voted in that earlier OFO appeal (under Obama) that LGBTQ discrimination constitutes discrimination “based on sex” under Title VII.


Proper function of EEOC is critical to restoring public trust in rule of law and government institutions. So keep making noise about the EEOC, ESPECIALLY on TWITTER.

Edited by user Sunday, March 7, 2021 1:23:26 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked idealist2cynicist for this useful post.
rebels8 on 3/7/2021(UTC)
idealist2cynicist  
#20 Posted : Monday, March 8, 2021 4:37:31 PM(UTC)
idealist2cynicist

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I'm going to repeat, to @lifeisahighway and all others, that frequently Tweeting members of Congress-- and even the EEOC (anonymously!) is a great way to voice frustration, AND POTENTIALLY PROMPT CHANGE.


For example, a good reply to this EEOC Tweet from the past week (https://twitter.com/USEEOC/status/1366456611179487233?s=20) would be something along the lines of the sample/draft Tweet below (tagging Carolyn Maloney because she chairs oversight committee)...


IF you don't already have lots of followers, replying to Tweets of entities and/or officials whose attention you're trying to get-- as opposed to posting entirely new Tweets on your feed that are limited to your followers-- is a good strategy to get more attention. Also include hashtags (e.g., #FederalSector, #JusticeForFederalWorkers, etc.), characters permitting.


If you do Tweet, you should probably just make sure there isn't information from your account-- including from prior or future Tweets-- for folks to piece your information/Tweets together and potentially figure out who you are. Feel free to copy and past the draft Tweet below, and/or otherwise similarly Tweet away at EEOC...



Sample reply Tweet to 3/1/21 @USEEOC Tweet:



For @USEEOC to TRULY overcome workplace barriers– INCLUDING in the "model employer" #FederalSector– it MUST hire *FAR MORE* staff to handle & timely process cases.

With its current severe delays in resolving cases, the #EEOC DENIES JUSTICE & undermines public trust.

@RepMaloney
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