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Jackie  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, June 29, 2021 10:00:36 AM(UTC)
Jackie

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I did a search and couldn't find any answer(s) to my question.

Quick update before my question:

1) I was a civil service (federal) employee from August 2015 to October 2016
2) I also received some time for serving under campaigns (so my SCD was backdated)
3) I returned to civil service (federal employment) in August 2019

Question: With the new rules for total creditable service <<5 CFR 315.201(b)>> why is my current record showing that my date eligible to transition to "Career" status as August 2022? Shouldn't it be sooner since I had previous service?
frankgonzalez  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, June 29, 2021 11:55:49 AM(UTC)
frankgonzalez

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Originally Posted by: Jackie Go to Quoted Post
I did a search and couldn't find any answer(s) to my question.

Quick update before my question:

1) I was a civil service (federal) employee from August 2015 to October 2016
2) I also received some time for serving under campaigns (so my SCD was backdated)
3) I returned to civil service (federal employment) in August 2019

Question: With the new rules for total creditable service <<5 CFR 315.201(b)>> why is my current record showing that my date eligible to transition to "Career" status as August 2022? Shouldn't it be sooner since I had previous service?
IIRC, if you are referring to military service when you mention "campaigns" then that just applies to leave and if you bought back the time, it applies when you retire, not for time served towards career status. Because you had a gap of over 30 days, that previous time can be added towards your retirement credit, but not towards career status. You need 3 years continuous to meet that requirement.

I believe an exception exists if you went from civil service to military service (ie were called up to active duty in Oct 2016 and were released by the military and returned to the civil service position Aug 2019). Then you should get credit for the initial period towards career status (but I believe this is an USERRA issue in that case).

I will defer to the HR gurus for a more detailed answer.

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
Jackie  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, June 29, 2021 12:43:29 PM(UTC)
Jackie

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Thank you Frank,

So based on FR 78497: The purpose of these final regulations is to remove the current requirement for creditable service to be substantially continuous and allow an individual to attain career tenure after completing at least 3 years of total creditable service. In addition, this rule removes the basis for the 30-day break-in-service rule. Because each period of creditable service stands alone, breaks in service are now irrelevant.

Let's eliminate part 2) of my updates and just look at 1 and 3. Based on that time (Aug 2015 to Oct 2016 and Aug 2019 to Present) wouldn't I have attained 3 years of Total Creditable Service and therefore reached career status? I'm just very confused based on all the information I've researched and I'm actually awaiting an answer from HR as well. Thanks again.
frankgonzalez  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, June 30, 2021 2:41:19 AM(UTC)
frankgonzalez

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Originally Posted by: Jackie Go to Quoted Post
Thank you Frank,

So based on FR 78497: The purpose of these final regulations is to remove the current requirement for creditable service to be substantially continuous and allow an individual to attain career tenure after completing at least 3 years of total creditable service. In addition, this rule removes the basis for the 30-day break-in-service rule. Because each period of creditable service stands alone, breaks in service are now irrelevant.

Let's eliminate part 2) of my updates and just look at 1 and 3. Based on that time (Aug 2015 to Oct 2016 and Aug 2019 to Present) wouldn't I have attained 3 years of Total Creditable Service and therefore reached career status? I'm just very confused based on all the information I've researched and I'm actually awaiting an answer from HR as well. Thanks again.
Were you on a Term or Temp or career (look at your SF50s) appointment for the initial period you listed? That would be critical in whether FR 78497 applies.

If it was a career appointment, then it will depend on exactly what the dates were. As it stands, allowing you started the first Monday of the months you list above, you would barely have 36 months of service. Later start dates in the month, and an early date for leaving in the first period could put you at only 34 or 35 months of service.

Edited by user Wednesday, June 30, 2021 2:46:26 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
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