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hadleyzoo  
#1 Posted : Monday, January 28, 2008 7:21:56 AM(UTC)
hadleyzoo

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Posts: 31

I have been selected for a promotion to a GS-6--secretary position. I am told this is a non-bargaining unit position?

What exactly does this mean? Am I jumping from a frying pan to a fire?
govtman  
#2 Posted : Monday, January 28, 2008 7:55:22 AM(UTC)
govtman

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Basically, non-bargaining employees are career and non-career employees in supervisory professional, technical, clerical, administrative, and managerial positions in the SES that are not subject to collective bargaining agreements.

Bargaining employees on the other hand, are represented by labor unions that negotiate with the US Government for wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment.

Most, if not all employees in an excepted service are ineligible to join a union.
hadleyzoo  
#3 Posted : Monday, January 28, 2008 8:24:25 PM(UTC)
hadleyzoo

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So in basic terms and experience from others, what exactly does this mean? They can work you like a dog and get away with it? They can require you to work overtime and not have to pay you?

I guess I still really don't understand the pros/cons to what a non-bargaining unit position is.
JohnnyBGoodPC  
#4 Posted : Monday, January 28, 2008 9:56:36 PM(UTC)
JohnnyBGoodPC

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There's generally not a lot of difference between the two, since pretty much all federal workers benefit from the agreements that the union makes. The federal unions aren't terribly powerful (since everyone who works for the feds signs a paper saying they can't strike), but they still somehow manage to get things done.

I lost my union-eligible status when I took a supervisory position, and the biggest differce for me was that DoD was able to convert me to NSPS (something the union is still fighting for many sub-agencies) as part of their NSPS trial thing. And of course, there wasn't anything I could do about that, but fortunately it's not the end of the world.
eagle918  
#5 Posted : Monday, January 28, 2008 11:40:08 PM(UTC)
eagle918

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Posts: 380

Hadley- If you are in a bargaining unit position now and are unsure what that does for you- you won't notice the difference when you move to a non-bargaining unit position. To answer one of your specific questions- no, you cannot be directed to work uncompensated overtime.
govtman  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, January 29, 2008 6:10:47 AM(UTC)
govtman

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Most likely, since she states she is seeking a secretarial position and due to the rank and most likely non-supervisory position, her position is probably Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA or Act) Nonexempt, meaning she will be eligible for overtime pay. However, it is true that some agencies will provide compensation in the form of compensatory time-off instead of actual overtime pay. Supervisors, managers, etc, will most likely be FLSA Exempt. Other categories of employees who receive alternate forms of overtime compensation are also FLSA Exempt, such as government firefighters and criminal investigators.

Here are the definitions of this somewhat complex law:

An employee or a geographic area may be exempt or nonexempt.

An FLSA exempt employee is one who is not covered by the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the FLSA.

An FLSA nonexempt employee is one who is covered by the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the Act.

Good luck!
edalder  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, January 29, 2008 7:32:44 AM(UTC)
edalder

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that you will be in a "sensitive" position where you will deal with confidential matters.

Some jobs in certain agencies, typically in HR or Labor Relations, are nonbargaining unit jobs, even though the duties themselves may not be managerial or supervisory in nature. It is often believed, either correctly or not, that it is too much of a conflict of interest to have a union person working in such a job.

Won't make you FLSA exempt or anything like that. You just will need to be "discrete" about some of the matters that come across your desk (and I am not talking solely about Privacy Act ones either).
Kivi
hadleyzoo  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, January 29, 2008 8:52:05 AM(UTC)
hadleyzoo

Rank: Newbie

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Joined: 4/14/2007(UTC)
Posts: 31

Thanks for all the insight everyone! Things are more clear now.

I'm looking forward to my new job next week and hope it's different from the one I'm in now. The one I am in now is a BORE, non-challenging, and just not busy enough for me.
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