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Retirement Planning


Whether you are close to federal employee retirement or just starting out in your career, this is the place to share ideas with your federal colleagues on creating a secure financial foundation.


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steveyanowsky  
#1 Posted : Saturday, November 01, 2008 10:20:00 PM(UTC)
steveyanowsky

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Somebody please answer this question? I am in New York State and cant seem to get answers even from NYS unemployment.

Thank you.
dsns5000  
#2 Posted : Saturday, November 01, 2008 10:28:26 PM(UTC)
dsns5000

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What I do know for certain is you have to qualify for employment listing your retirement income. If it is less than the previous 12 months regular income than you qualify.
ncsolutions  
#3 Posted : Saturday, November 01, 2008 10:49:40 PM(UTC)
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The rules governing unemployment compensation are different from state to state, but generally if you leave a job voluntarily you don't get unemployment benefits. To qualify for benefits the reason for your unemployment must be involuntary separation or layoff from your job for reasons other than misconduct or delinquency, i.e., through no fault of your own.
quote:
Unemployment insurance is temporary income for eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own....
An early retirement (as opposed to discontinued service retirement) is a voluntary choice, so I'd guess that it won't meet the requirement for benefits.

[This message was edited by BobMcC on November 02, 2008 at 10:02 AM.]
Future CFE  
#4 Posted : Saturday, November 01, 2008 10:56:48 PM(UTC)
Future CFE

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Unemployment insurance is temporary income for eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own and who are ready, willing, and able to work. You must have sufficient work and wages in covered employment. In New York State, the money for unemployment insurance benefits comes from taxes paid by employers. No deductions are ever made from a worker's paycheck for unemployment insurance. It is the Department of Labor that determines whether an unemployed worker qualifies for unemployment.

Sounds like no, and as a taxpayer in NYS I should hope not...
martyb  
#5 Posted : Saturday, November 01, 2008 10:59:43 PM(UTC)
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If the spouse of a federal employee has to quit their job due to a job transfer, the spouse can file for an receive unemployment benefits. That is one instance I know of where a voluntary resignation does result in eligibility. When I transferred from LA to TX, my wife drew unemployment for a few months till she found a job. We have just moved again, from LA to WI and the job market here in this area is not very good. It'a smaller town, and the major employer (large GM plant) and several supporting businesses are closing. Thousands of people losing thier jobs. Jobs aren't easy to come by. My wife has put in a number of applications, but will be filing for unemployment next week..
Forum trolls to 0%
maxketter  
#6 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2008 5:45:53 AM(UTC)
maxketter

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Steve the answer is NO... I'm taken aback that you would even ask
daves  
#7 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2008 6:09:00 AM(UTC)
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I'm in CA, but here I always tell people who are not sure whether they are eligible or not to file anyway. Let the state government make the determination. If they approve you, good! If they deny you, you always have the option of requesting a hearing at no cost to you. At a hearing, an ALJ decides whether the initial denying official was correct or not. If the hearing is decided in your favor, you get all the back benefits to date plus future benefits. If the hearing is against you, you have lost nothing except some of your time and maybe the cost of a few phone calls and postage.
maxketter  
#8 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2008 8:25:22 AM(UTC)
maxketter

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the answer is still nooooooo
futureretire  
#9 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2008 8:43:44 AM(UTC)
futureretire

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In many states you can file for unemployment, but then they have laws that offset that fact. So, you can legally apply, but let's face it, it'll all balance out since you have an income.
daves  
#10 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2008 9:37:24 AM(UTC)
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quote:
Originally posted by futureretire:
In many states you can file for unemployment, but then they have laws that offset that fact. So, you can legally apply, but let's face it, it'll all balance out since you have an income.


Not necessarily. Sometimes pension income offsets the UIB benefits, sometimes it does not. State laws vary. And the reason for the early retirement may affect it. Was it truly voluntary or was it to avoid an involuntary reassignment or other job action? Did the early retirement prevent another employee from being displaced? Was it for health or family reasons? Plenty of retired feds have collected UIB along with their annuity and buyout package. So it is not a unilateral 'no'.

Get your answers from the state employment department instead of the guessing game here.
jaybones  
#11 Posted : Monday, November 03, 2008 3:59:54 AM(UTC)
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When a person asks for a factual answer, you really shouldn't respond with how you wish things were, when the facts are different. While I philosphically agree with you that a person should not file for unemployment when the person controls whether or not they become unemployed, the correct answer to the question is that it depends upon the local laws, just as BobMcC and others, stated. So you shouldn't keep insisting that the answer is "No" when that is an incorrect answer to the question.
maxketter  
#12 Posted : Monday, November 03, 2008 5:03:26 AM(UTC)
maxketter

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the answer is still NO. Unfortunately some posters want to dance around any issue regardless if its cut and dried this issue is cut and dried the answer is NO
cowhide covers  
#13 Posted : Thursday, November 13, 2008 6:53:52 AM(UTC)
cowhide covers

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How is it that military retiree's are eligible to draw unemployment benefits after voluntarily retiring? I was on UB for 4 months while searching for a job.
miracleblake  
#14 Posted : Wednesday, November 26, 2008 11:23:24 PM(UTC)
miracleblake

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I understand that you can only qualify in certain states. If you don't mind, what state are you in or do you know what states do you qualify for uc when you have retired from the military. Also, was your pay offset?
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