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Retirement Planning


Whether you are close to federal employee retirement or just starting out in your career, this is the place to share ideas with your federal colleagues on creating a secure financial foundation.


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let me out  
#1 Posted : Saturday, January 24, 2009 11:58:44 PM(UTC)
let me out

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What is the appropriate amount of notice to give a boss regarding your date of retirement? I fear that giving too much time could make for a miserable remaining time. Even if the boss acts as if they are happy for you they could possibly retaliate and make life miserable-especially if they cannot backfill. Anyone out there have ideas or experience telling a boss of their retirement date?
treblig  
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2009 12:28:44 AM(UTC)
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I would start by hinting that you're considering retirement maybe one year before you actually retire. If your boss knows that you're thinking about it then it won't be such a surprise when you actually do. Nothng angers a boss more than a surprise. As for the final warning, when you know for a fact that you're going to retire I would let them know at least 6 months in advance so they can have time to recruit and train someone to replace you. There are also many time/paperwork hurdles that you need to clear before you retire so you need a little time for that. Your boss (if he/she is a good person should be very happy about your retirement. A good boss should do everything possible to make your last months as rewarding as possible. Why would someone make your life miserable just because you're retiring???
If your boss is "bad" then don't give him/her any more advance notice than necessary. It would no sense for someone's boss to be upset/angry with someone who chooses to retire...Gil in Tex
ILDOD  
#3 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2009 12:52:17 AM(UTC)
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If you have a good relationship with your boss, then give them as much notice as possible. I gave approximately a one year notice. Many jobs are fairly complicated these days so giving notice as soon as you are sure you want to retire gives management (and you) enough time to train a replacement. I believe everyone in the organization would appreciate that.
sakijo  
#4 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2009 1:27:15 AM(UTC)
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Like ILDOD said, if the relationship with your boss is good, give the asa much notice as possible. If not, then drop hints of you intentions - "I can retire anytime now" If really bad, then prepare all the necessary paperwork and just don't show up one day. When they call you, you can say "I've retired"
Warrenlm  
#5 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2009 2:10:49 AM(UTC)
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For those in a billet important to the organization, early advice is the right thing to do.

One effect to consider, though, is the effect on your "quality of job experience". I've seen it happen at every management level from first line supervisor to Senior Executive. As soon as it is thought that you might be retiring in the future, regardless of whether you've announced a date or even timeframe, the others around you will begin to move on. Not in every instance, of course, but enough to affect your attitude, they will plan work without you, discuss policies without you, and generally operate as though your input is not needed.
Wendy09  
#6 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 12:34:54 AM(UTC)
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quote:
Originally posted by Warren:


One effect to consider, though, is the effect on your "quality of job experience". I've seen it happen at every management level from first line supervisor to Senior Executive. As soon as it is thought that you might be retiring in the future, regardless of whether you've announced a date or even timeframe, the others around you will begin to move on. Not in every instance, of course, but enough to affect your attitude, they will plan work without you, discuss policies without you, and generally operate as though your input is not needed.


This exact thing is happening to me. When I say something about it,I'm told "I won't be here much longer anyway so why should I care". But I do care and I am still here but my boss doesn't get it.
countdown  
#7 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 1:07:48 AM(UTC)
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I agree with the concensus of giving as much notice as possible, especially if your job is of large scope and turnover is difficult. Some aspects of my former job only needed attention once a year. Hard to train people when that is the case.

I gave my boss one years notice and he spent the year trying different ways to convince me to stay and finally got my replacement 3 months before I left. That was his bad....I trained the guy as best I could.

Wendy878,

Be glad they are moving on. I know it is hard but I don't think they are doing anything malicious. They are getting ready for your departure and if you will pardon my frankness, I think you may be experiencing a bit of loss of your "professional identity" and miss how that made you feel. I too cared but the bottom line was and is, I am gone and the office will carry on fine without me. Accepting that reality will make your transition to retirement a lot easier. Enjoy your time left and plan what you are going to do in this next phase of your life!! Good Luck!
toymeister  
#8 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 4:25:04 AM(UTC)
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My absolute favorite retirement story is a coworker who was endlessly harassed by our boss for various petty things

One day He did not show up after a 2 week vacation. She was not able to contact him. By the third day she contacted HR to see how she should start documenting his AWOL status their stunned response was “He is not AWOL he retired!”

So apparently no advance notice is required
treblig  
#9 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 5:18:03 AM(UTC)
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Payback is H3LL!!!Gil in Tex
The HalfBreed  
#10 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 9:58:48 AM(UTC)
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quote:
Originally posted by toymeister:
My absolute favorite retirement story is a coworker who was endlessly harassed by our boss for various petty things

One day He did not show up after a 2 week vacation. She was not able to contact him. By the third day she contacted HR to see how she should start documenting his AWOL status their stunned response was “He is not AWOL he retired!”

So apparently no advance notice is required



Absolutely !!!

However, if you get along with the supervisor, I'd give some heads up. There is no need to give notification otherwise. Work was done before you got there, and will continue to be done when you leave. I hope they get the online retirement program working soon. Like stated above, I may just not show up one day, and that'll be that. OR, I may just show up on a Friday, watch TV and lounge around. When asked or "DIRECTED" to get up and get some work done, I'll oblige them, with the comment that, "I'm here for 2 more hours, and then, I'm history".

Depends on your situation.
RETIRED 12/19/2012 !!! Good Bye Tension !!! Hello Pension !!!
sakijo  
#11 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 10:47:36 AM(UTC)
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quote:
Originally posted by toymeister:
My absolute favorite retirement story is a coworker who was endlessly harassed by our boss for various petty things

One day He did not show up after a 2 week vacation. She was not able to contact him. By the third day she contacted HR to see how she should start documenting his AWOL status their stunned response was “He is not AWOL he retired!”

So apparently no advance notice is required


I have a friend who was a retirement counselor. On Monday, a guy walks in and says that he wanted to retire. When asked what date, he stated "last Friday."

My own story was almost as good. I was returning to the US from Japan due to a management decision not to extend my contract. After making the arrangements to pack up, move out, etc. I went to the office and told my stupidvisor that all was taken care of, and I'd be in and out of the office outprocessing. She said, so, you'll be here all next week, right? I looked at her and said "No, I fly out on Saturday" (this being Thursday). Talk aabout inept - she signed the paperwork not to keep me on and even decided my last day of work. DUH!
MaleMan  
#12 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 5:35:00 PM(UTC)
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toymeister

Man, you just brought back memories, this happened over thirty years ago . . . But I remember it like it was yesterday. This of course would be my absolute favorite retirement story:

It was a period of continual Over-Time hours being dictated on an almost daily basis. And one of the "old-timers" didn't want any overtime much less the 2 hours he was getting on a daily basis.

Well, this day they caught this "old-timer" at the time clock as he was getting ready to clock out to lunch. The boss said: "Mr. Old-Timer, you are to stay two hours overtime at the end of your shift today." His reply to the boss, as he was running his timecard through the clock: "I am going to lunch - And I WON'T be back."

Right as he finished the statement the time clock gave its beep signal to confirm the clock ring, he hung his card on the rack and walked out the door. That is the last time I ever saw the man! His last clock ring was "Out To Lunch". I wonder if they think he is just taking a looonngg lunch.

By the way, not a single word came out of the boss's mouth as any type of response to Mr. Old-Timers comment.

After all these years, I still feel some joy as to these last seconds of this guys time on the job.

This could be a fun thread - if everyone would post their favorite retirement story?

Ya gotta love it. . .
<font color=RED><em> <center> Just Because You're Paranoid - Doesn't Mean They Aren't Out To Get You. </em> </center></font>
let me out  
#13 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 8:51:17 PM(UTC)
let me out

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Yes-let's keep all the stories and advice coming. As I plan to retire in the next 5 months or so I want to have "expert" advice<
wyckoffd  
#14 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2009 11:08:22 PM(UTC)
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I plan to retire this June, I am also on the list for a V.S.I.P. (early buyout)so I may go early or if it comes after I won't get it. Anyway after the 1st of the year I asked my boss if I should make it official that I was going to retire. He told that I should call a friend in HRO and ask that If I announced my retirement if I would still be eligble for a VSIP. I called and they said no and not to put my request in to retire until I got the notice.Otherwise I would not be eligible.
My boss is looking out for me and co-workers are okay with it too. I would have gone out at the end of last year but wanted to get my NSPS payraise first and to finish up my looseends so as not to burden my co-workers.
mtfed  
#15 Posted : Tuesday, January 27, 2009 6:09:12 AM(UTC)
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I've already told my supervisor I had 16 years and 7 months left till my retirement. Wink She got a kick out of it. I'm not "disgrunteled" sp?, just wanted her to know! Gotta keep the humor in my job, don't you know! Smile
countdown  
#16 Posted : Tuesday, January 27, 2009 6:17:52 AM(UTC)
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Perfect! I agree, keep up your sense of humor. Things can be tougher than they need be when we lose our ability to laugh....especially at ourselves!
rico  
#17 Posted : Tuesday, January 27, 2009 6:45:55 AM(UTC)
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All things being, a good time period to let HR and the Boss know you are retiring is about three months. You should not have to worry about being harrased. You might get extra work but with the thought of retiring on your mind it will be a breeze. If you don't finish, so what.
Three months gives HR time to get a JOA made up for your soon to be vacated spot. It also gets everyone who depends on you used to the idea that you'll be gone soon and they will have to do the work themselves. It also gives HR plenty of time to get Your paperwork straight.
robertray  
#18 Posted : Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:43:52 AM(UTC)
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I retired January 2nd and my boss called me today to see when and if I was coming off annual leave. (smile)
maxketter  
#19 Posted : Wednesday, January 28, 2009 9:52:00 AM(UTC)
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sounds like you made a real difference that the taxpayers made a good investment in you
W2R  
#20 Posted : Tuesday, February 10, 2009 1:53:25 AM(UTC)
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My supervisor has known I was planning to retire in November, 2009, since 23 months beforehand. This is because she was a co-worker and friend, and not my supervisor at that time. She became my supervisor 11 months before my planned retirement.(Yes, it is GREAT having her for a supervisor now!!) Big Grin

However, I have not filed any paperwork or made it official, and I have always emphasized that this is my PLANNED retirement date, and not written in stone.

Since the economic crash, I have told her several times that everything was still on course and looking good to retire this coming November. However, I always tell her that nothing is written in stone yet, and we can never know what might happen.

I have let my other co-workers know during the past year, so it is public knowledge.

Yes, I am not getting the long term assignments and I don't have to go to quite as many meetings. Some of my assignments are thinly disguised "write down how you do thus and such" assignments. But I don't care!! Like my supervisor, I really WANT my unit to be able to make this transition seamlessly.

I have no idea when to get the paperwork started. I asked our human resources people and they said "any time now", and when I asked about a sort of average or ideal time, they said "six months beforehand". I know that I don't have to give that much notice, but I would also like for them to confirm that I am eligible to retire on the date I picked. I don't see why I wouldn't be, but it would be nice to have that confirmed.

(In my case there is no possibility of any incentives, since we are having recruitment/ retention problems.)
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