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Deafening Silence  
#1 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 1:17:16 PM(UTC)
Deafening Silence

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I want to quit working for the Federal Government. Micromanagement to the highest degree.

What is the process?

What should I avoid and what should I definitely do?

I can wait a little longer, should I wait a little longer or just go for it?

Please tell me your stories of fantastic success and happiness after leaving the government.

restonham  
#2 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 1:35:50 PM(UTC)
restonham

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Just call your personnel office and tell them you want to resign.  Two weeks notice is fair, but, in reality, you can quit in one day.  You can get Cobra for your health insurance, but you will pay full rate plus.
 
Not sure why you want to leave - private companies micromanage also.  Depends on your job and career field.  Probably better to actually have another job lined up before you resign.  Just in case you like eating and having a roof over your head.
Will  
#3 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 3:52:03 PM(UTC)
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Skip waiting until you have a new job, take 2 months off and do a lot of traveling then start job hunting.

It can be a little nerve rattleing looking for that job but the 2 months of having to worry about are great.  Something I now plan to again in about 7 years.
buckeyeguy2010  
#4 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 8:42:38 PM(UTC)
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I disagree with the any advice to just quit without any firm plans of what to do next.   Based on personal experiences, being unemployed will probably be much worse for you than being micro-managed.  Plus, how are you going to explain to potential future employers why you just quit with no plans for the future?  Besides cutting off your income, health insurance (for which you only pay around 25% of the actual premium), TSP, etc., what do you plan to do to fill your time?  Believe me, having nothing to do but apply for a new job (esp., in an economy like the current one) will shortly get to feel much worse than even having a job that you hate (but at least pays the bills)!  If your current position is so bad, at least try to secure another position (even another federal position)before you quit.  Also, remember not to burn any bridges on your way out.  
Retreaded DD/GS Careerist
TRW  
#5 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 10:35:05 PM(UTC)
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Micromanagement in the private sector can be as bad or worse than the government sector. 
 
You wouldn't believe some of the crazy and zany stories I have heard from people I know working in the private sector.  I have relatives that have had to do their "bosses" personal errands (pick up and drop off dry cleaning, walk the dog, etc.) as a condition of their employment.  That wouldn't happen in a publicly owned company, or in a local, state, or federal government workplace.
Pivotman  
#6 Posted : Monday, March 08, 2010 11:04:06 PM(UTC)
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God help us
Rocky Run  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, March 09, 2010 12:11:35 AM(UTC)
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Quitting a job because you can't take it will make you look like a quitter who can't handle pressure down the road.  Future employer will ask why you left the job.  You do realize that if you quit you won't be eligible for unemployment benefits.  You're on your own.  Like others have said, don't burn your bridges no matter how unhappy you are.  Start looking for other jobs and don't leave this job until you have another solid offer.
Katydid_MD  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, March 09, 2010 2:09:29 AM(UTC)
Katydid_MD

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I quit my (GS-13) government job a few years back, without even having a new job lined up, for various reasons having to do with a change of management and direction, lack of new challenges and upward mobility (except to go into management, which would DEFINITELY be a BIG challenge for me!), and a horrendous commute -- 1.75 hours each way, if Metro was running at peak performance.  I had been at that job for over 15 years.
 
Here are some things I considered, however:
1)  Outstanding debt (should be low)
2)  Household income (should have some source of income, from spouse, savings, etc., to keep things going while waiting for the next job)
3)  What to look for in new job, and impact of being employed/unemployed on future job prospects
   A)  As a government employee with status, I was "reinstatement eligible."
   B)  I received a cash payment for accrued annual leave to help pay incidentals for a while.
   C)  I qualified for COBRA until I could join spouse's insurance.
   D)  Desirable qualities of new job:  short commute, good annual/sick leave, interesting and challenging duties, casual attire policy, maybe part time?
   E)  If my new job were a federal job, I could be paid according to the Maximum Payable Rate.
   F)  If my new job were a federal job, I would earn annual leave at the rate of 8 hours per pay period; if not, I would most likely start out at two weeks per year.
 
This story has a very happy ending.  After about 14 months, I started my new federal job as GS-7, Step 10 (Maximum Payable Rate), with a promotion "ladder" to GS-12.  My work is interesting, and I've got a great bunch of motivated, hard-working colleagues.  My commute is short (about 1/2 hour from door to desk), and casual attire is prevalent in my workplace.  Schedules are flexible, and there is an active work-at-home program.  I am now earning more than I was when I left my previous job (but not as much as I would be making if I hadn't left that job, as I would have had some step increases, etc. in the meanwhile).
 
So, start planning now.  Save money, pay off debt, bank your annual leave, and apply for new jobs, too -- you may get lucky before your preparations put you in a position to leave the unsatisfactory job.  And as another posted says, "Don't burn your bridges."
 
Good luck to you!
Katydid_MD  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, March 09, 2010 2:19:50 AM(UTC)
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PS -- No job I applied for had any issues about me quitting my previous job, after 15 years and reaching the top grade allowable for non-management.  I had my reasons, and they were legitimate and honorable. 
 
My interview panel for my current job did have a lot of questions about why I would "downgrade" so far, but apparently my explanation was good enough, because they hired me.  Explanation:  I'm changing into a new series, where I expect the work to be much more rewarding than in my previous position, and there is ample potential for promotion.  I don't expect to start out at the top, but I do expect to enjoy my work and move up quickly. 
 
K.
monster  
#10 Posted : Friday, March 12, 2010 9:20:00 AM(UTC)
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Katydid_MD wrote:
PS -- No job I applied for had any issues about me quitting my previous job, after 15 years and reaching the top grade allowable for non-management. 
 
 
K.
 
You applied for a GS-7 position...practically entry level. Why would they care? After all...they are getting a GS-13 person for a GS-7 position.
 
Another thing...your spouse also works. You are obviously the supplementary salary. Could have work at Walmart and still okay.
Pick  
#11 Posted : Saturday, March 13, 2010 9:04:09 AM(UTC)
Pick

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As someone who has been on hiring panels from GS-5 to GS-13, I can honestly say I am always interesting in why someone wants to take that big of a drop in grade.  Katydid's answer was a good one. 

As far as "getting a GS-13 person for a GS-7 position", in some cases, that might not be a good thing.  I had a GS-14 interview for a GS-12 position once and he was more interested in telling the panel how he would run the program instead of how he would do the GS-12 job.  We didn't need someone to run the program (we had a GS-15, GS-14, and three GS-13's to do that).  We needed a worker bee.
Katydid_MD  
#12 Posted : Sunday, March 14, 2010 7:10:48 AM(UTC)
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monster wrote:

Another thing...your spouse also works. You are obviously the supplementary salary. Could have work at Walmart and still okay.
 
My spouse had the supplementary salary up until the time I quit my job, and he's back in that position again now.  Luckily, he didn't (and doesn't) have ego problems about my salary.  We could get by on his salary alone, long-term, but it wouldn't be fun.  (Neither would working at Wal-Mart!)
 
 
nodog  
#13 Posted : Sunday, March 14, 2010 10:47:51 PM(UTC)
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In this economy it's hard to think why anyone would want to quit a secure job and join the hunt with all the millions of layed off workers. I guess people have their reasons but I would think it easier to change jobs in the Civil Service than to be hired in the private or public sector. Attach your resume to any series you find interesting that you have even the minimal experience with. Nowdays a GS-13's pay is hard to compete with on the outside, not to mention the leave time and other benifits.
Katydid_MD  
#14 Posted : Monday, March 15, 2010 5:44:14 AM(UTC)
Katydid_MD

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As nodog points out, the economy is much worse today, and finding a new job much more difficult, than it was when I made my decision in 2005.  Still, only YOU know all the pertinent details of your situation; consider carefully before making any irrevocable changes.  If I were in the same situation today, I can't say I would make all the same choices.
 
Good luck with whatever you decide!
TheFrederalGovt  
#15 Posted : Monday, March 15, 2010 9:48:26 PM(UTC)
TheFrederalGovt

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Katydid_MD wrote:

monster wrote:

Another thing...your spouse also works. You are obviously the supplementary salary. Could have work at Walmart and still okay.
 
My spouse had the supplementary salary up until the time I quit my job, and he's back in that position again now.  Luckily, he didn't (and doesn't) have ego problems about my salary.  We could get by on his salary alone, long-term, but it wouldn't be fun.  (Neither would working at Wal-Mart!)
 
 
 
I think what the poster was saying, and I dont think he was trying to be offensive is that being married allowed you the flexibility to quit your GS-13 job with less stress. I do admire what you said about not wanting to do management work, very few people admit that.......just know that single people do not have that option to quit and start over again if you will.
 
Congrats on starting over successfully though. I do respect people who take risks and yours was a considerable one that paid off!
opel  
#16 Posted : Monday, March 22, 2010 1:52:12 AM(UTC)
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If you do not like working for any employer (fed or not) just leave quickly. You are not doing yourself or them any favor.
spence  
#17 Posted : Monday, March 22, 2010 4:51:16 PM(UTC)
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If you quit, you should view it as quitting your job or maybe your agency, not the "federal government."  The federal government is not monolithic and there are plenty of places within it that do not micromanage.

I for one would not just quit in this economy, I would apply for other jobs first, both federal and other jobs.  Find out what the work environments are like before you apply since that's important to you.  Good luck!

Deafening Silence  
#18 Posted : Monday, August 23, 2010 9:39:52 PM(UTC)
Deafening Silence

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I can't stop feeling this way.

The micromanagement has fallen into the background although it does still enrage me from time to time.

The mind-numbing boredom however has always been there.

I'm not a veteran and there's no way to move up in my current position. I would basically have to start over and compete for positions in which I could never get because I don't have veterans preference.

What should I do?

Can I cash in my annual leave?

roaringtiger  
#19 Posted : Monday, August 23, 2010 11:33:20 PM(UTC)
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Deafening Silence wrote:
I can't stop feeling this way.


What should I do?

 
 
Go panhandle on the streets...you won't have any micromanagement and you will be your own boss.
martyb  
#20 Posted : Tuesday, August 24, 2010 12:01:11 AM(UTC)
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roaringtiger wrote:
Deafening Silence wrote:
I can't stop feeling this way.


What should I do?

 
 
Go panhandle on the streets...you won't have any micromanagement and you will be your own boss.
 
 
Just be sure to pay taxes on your income though, I'll be retiring soon and I want to make sure uncle sugar can afford to pay me! Wink
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