Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

HHS

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves.

Source: www.hhs.gov/about/

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
roaringtiger  
#1 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 12:26:20 AM(UTC)
roaringtiger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/9/2010(UTC)
Posts: 682

I recently joined NIH and it is full of MDs, PhDs, and seems to be very well run and highly respected as a research and scientific grants institution. It has quite a few nobe laureates as well. Is it really as some people say "the jewel in the crown" of the federal government?
Snork  
#2 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 1:22:59 AM(UTC)
Snork

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 4/16/2010(UTC)
Posts: 452

And it should be full of PhD's and MD's, it's a research institute.  According to the best places ranking, of 216, they're number 72.  Not sure about this crown jewel stuff. 

kg78  
#3 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 2:54:46 AM(UTC)
kg78

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/19/2009(UTC)
Posts: 612

Isn't it DOJ that consistently takes the top spot year after year of the top federal agencies to work for?  Admittedly, that's a cabinet level agency (which is only compared to other cabinet level agencies), but even if you're looking at subagencies, I believe that alot of DOJ subagencies consistently take VERY VERY high spots.

Yes, NIH is very well regarded, but don't drink the kool-aid into thinking that they're the best agency in the whole federal government.  Might they be the best agency for you?  Very possibly.  But on a ranking of employee satisfaction, they're about middle of the road.
Ninja  
#4 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 3:37:48 AM(UTC)
Ninja

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/4/2007(UTC)
Posts: 62

Here's the top 10 list from the surveys:
 

1 Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2 Government Accountability Office

3 National Aeronautics and Space Administration

4 Intelligence Community

5 Department of State

6 Environmental Protection Agency

7 Department of Justice

8 General Services Administration

9 Social Security Administration

10 Department of Commerce

 
kg78, DOJ fares well in the surveys but it hasn't taken the top spot in recent years (if ever, I am not sure how far back the data goes).  NRC has had the top spot for 2 years.
 
Ninja2010-07-26 11:44:00
kg78  
#5 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 4:00:56 AM(UTC)
kg78

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/19/2009(UTC)
Posts: 612

I stand corrected. :)
 
It's all the same thing to me, since I work at one of the bottom of the list places (though from my understanding there are high hopes that it has improved greatly in the 2010 survey).
roaringtiger  
#6 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 4:53:54 AM(UTC)
roaringtiger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/9/2010(UTC)
Posts: 682

I wasn't talking about the best federal agency to work for. The best company is not necessarily the best company to work for, I was talking about the best run, the most respected and the agency with the highest ROI (return on investment) for the public. That IMHO would be the NIH. Where else are you finding cures for cancer, AIDS or mapping the human genome?
kg78  
#7 Posted : Monday, July 26, 2010 5:07:11 AM(UTC)
kg78

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/19/2009(UTC)
Posts: 612

Perhaps, but I still view that as some self serving drinking of the kool-aid.
 
Sure they help cure all kinds of things through investments in medical research, but what about DOEnergy and the work they do funding alternative energy sources (admittedly a MUCH smaller portion of our national budget, but they do as much as they can with the money given).
 
But how can you say that OPM doesn't get a greater ROI than the others?  The work they do helps ensure some of the great results other agencies get.  They formulate HR policy that ensures work places be as fair as possible.  They administer the benefits that the entire federal government recieves from healthcare, to life insurance, to our federal pension plans, to what TSP funds are available.  These benefits and policies serve to attract the excellent workers at NIH, DOE, DOJ, and many other agencies.
 
I think if you take a big picture kind of look, you would see that while the work that the NIH does is important and awesome, the work of other federal agencies shouldn't be necessarily looked down upon as it seems you're doing (by placing your agency's work on such a high pedestal, you do thereby place everyone else's work much lower in comparison).  You're trying to compare ROI, but to be fair, that's hard to do in a government that does very little that's motivated by profit (excepting maybe the IRS, which exists solely to reap in income to fund the rest of the government).
xayide  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, July 27, 2010 7:09:35 AM(UTC)
xayide

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/5/2010(UTC)
Posts: 6

I think that depends on what you value. On one hand, the NIH turns out great research. But I'm more interested in the CDC for the more practical end - research is great, but without a system and field staff to reach people who are at risk or infected what is the point?

I know people who work for NIH and are very happy. But making an argument that NIH is the best place to work because they have the best mission? I don't think that holds up.
TheFrederalGovt  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, July 28, 2010 3:15:57 AM(UTC)
TheFrederalGovt

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 6/25/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,197

What position were you selected for and what was the interview process like? I was referred for a Grants Policy Analyst position and am hoping that I get selected.
roaringtiger  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, July 28, 2010 4:19:38 AM(UTC)
roaringtiger

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/9/2010(UTC)
Posts: 682

TheFrederalGovt wrote:
What position were you selected for and what was the interview process like? I was referred for a Grants Policy Analyst position and am hoping that I get selected.
 
I am an auditor. The interview wasn't too bad, strictly behavioural consisting of a panel of 4 including the director. They were impressed with my qualifications (I attended the best accounting program in the country and have Big 4 experience as well as the CPA license) and my answers. PM me for any specific questions.
 
Are you interviewing for OPERA?  BTW I thought you were already working for the Feds?
roaringtiger2010-07-28 12:25:18
DCNATSFAN  
#11 Posted : Thursday, July 29, 2010 4:30:55 AM(UTC)
DCNATSFAN

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2010(UTC)
Posts: 7

I am a current Career HHS employee looking for a different job ;).
kg78  
#12 Posted : Thursday, July 29, 2010 5:12:26 AM(UTC)
kg78

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/19/2009(UTC)
Posts: 612

Are you at NIH though, or at a different sub agency of HHS?  Just curious, DCNATSFAN :)
DCNATSFAN  
#13 Posted : Thursday, July 29, 2010 5:18:34 AM(UTC)
DCNATSFAN

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/6/2010(UTC)
Posts: 7

I work at a different HHS Sub-Agency, however I post interesting job openings throughout HHS (even in divisions where I do not work), just because I think people might be interested in them

DCNATSFAN2010-07-29 13:24:45
StellaMaris  
#14 Posted : Tuesday, September 07, 2010 1:34:53 AM(UTC)
StellaMaris

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 7/9/2008(UTC)
Posts: 660

NIH is probably the best of all DHHS to work for. 
 
Some are a disaster like the Program Support Center which is rather corrupt and has a bunch of idiots running it.
Great Spirit, let me not judge another until I have walked in his moccasins a moon or two.
Juniper  
#15 Posted : Thursday, February 24, 2011 11:12:11 AM(UTC)
Juniper

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 2/23/2011(UTC)
Posts: 5

I always thought highly of NIH, FDA, and CDC. All of those are under HHS. I am surprised if that's not the jewel of the federal government since a lot of great stuff comes from them for us as American citizens.

GeorgeSpelvin  
#16 Posted : Sunday, February 27, 2011 11:25:19 AM(UTC)
GeorgeSpelvin

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 4/28/2009(UTC)
Posts: 81


roaringtiger wrote:
I recently joined NIH and it is full of MDs, PhDs, and seems to be very well run and highly respected as a research and scientific grants institution. It has quite a few nobe laureates as well. Is it really as some people say "the jewel in the crown" of the federal government?


Are you really young or just really excited to be in your new job? Big smile

I ask because you say that you recently started working there, you're impressed by the presence of lots of M.D.s and Ph.D.s, and then in a later post in this thread you answer your own question by stating that in your opinion it's one of the "best run" and "most respected" agencies and has a high ROI.

My comment is that first, there are other agencies with large numbers of M.D.'s and Ph.D.'s and that alone does not necessarily make an agency well-run or a "crown jewel." Second, how important or well-regarded an agency is (or what the ROI is) depends on which stakeholders you ask. The Department of Veterans Affairs probably has more M.D.'s and Ph.D.'s than any agency. Is it well run? Well, that's debatable. Does it perform a very critical mission in providing health care (and health research, mind you) for millions of Veterans? Yes.

Another example, though, more similar to NIH would be the National Science Foundation. NSF is also full of lots of scientists and typically scores highly as a place to work. Ditto the CDC -- lots of M.D.'s and Ph.D.'s. (Criticized in the past in how it was run, though a lot of restructuring occurred at CDC over the last 8 or 9 years).

So, in the final analysis, whether an agency is well-run is something you can probably learn about from a couple of sources: the survey results people mentioned (which give you an idea of the employees' perceptions) and government performance results: How well is the agency doing in actually achieving the annual and long-term goals that are monitored by OMB, GAO, OPM, etc. Just because an agency is studying important problems and doing research doesn't necessarily mean it is achieving results proportional to the money invested...
GeorgeSpelvin2011-02-27 19:35:36
CPAAudit  
#17 Posted : Sunday, February 27, 2011 12:30:48 PM(UTC)
CPAAudit

Rank: Advisor

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2010(UTC)
Posts: 178

This seems more like a "where I work is the best" kind of post, haha.
Kirth  
#18 Posted : Friday, March 04, 2011 12:28:36 AM(UTC)
Kirth

Rank: Groupie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/5/2009(UTC)
Posts: 79

Nothing is best, but NIH obviously is second to none. It has one of the best scientific teams in the world. Of course, the work is stressful sometimes since its regulation is tough for the sake of human health.
ktnbs  
#19 Posted : Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:23:00 AM(UTC)
ktnbs

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 2/16/2011(UTC)
Posts: 10

I transferred to a sub-agency of HHS from USDA. Though I was not surprised (and warned   that their HR was "challenged"), I found that out first hand. TOS reimbursement took 4 months after submitting forms the day I arrived; I made sure they kept me on the books as CSRS but three months later I was switched to FERS by "mistake" and that took four weeks to correct; Then when they withdrew the FERS matching and one percent from my TSP they went further back than when they mistakenly put me in FERS....still not resolved. Other than that, it's okay and nice change for me all in all.
Rss Feed  Atom Feed
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.


This page was generated in 2.109 seconds.