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Winter2010  
#1 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:03:35 AM(UTC)
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What is Bargaining Unite Position and what is Obligated position. 
 
Many federal jobs have this one year probationary period.  Do most or virtually everyone else pass this period and continue their employment? 
lazyfed  
#2 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:15:45 AM(UTC)
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UNION
Winter2010  
#3 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:20:44 AM(UTC)
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lazyfed wrote:
UNION
 
Obligated or Bargaining? 
 
Can you elaborate what it means to be in a union?  Pros and cons. 
spence  
#4 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:41:24 AM(UTC)
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A bargaining unit position means you are eligible to be in a union, but you never have to join it.  I join my union because I want better representation and I want to have a voice in it.  Pay is set by Congress, not by negotiations, but having strong membership still helps the union make its case in lobbying efforts.  My union fights for us in Congress, in court, in arbitration, and at the workplace on issues such as telework, contracting out, tuition assistance, performance evaluation criteria, performance awards, and merit promotion.
Winter2010  
#5 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:47:52 AM(UTC)
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spence wrote:
A bargaining unit position means you are eligible to be in a union, but you never have to join it.  I join my union because I want better representation and I want to have a voice in it.  Pay is set by Congress, not by negotiations, but having strong membership still helps the union make its case in lobbying efforts.  My union fights for us in Congress, in court, in arbitration, and at the workplace on issues such as telework, contracting out, tuition assistance, performance evaluation criteria, performance awards, and merit promotion.
What are the cons?  
spence  
#6 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 4:50:25 AM(UTC)
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The only con I can think of is dues.  Mine are a little over 1%.  I guess if your union is one that imposes a lot of unnecessary, strict rules on the employer, like so and so can't work in this other department, that's a different line of work, it can also be frustrating to be in a bargaining unit position.  But my union isn't like that.
spence2010-10-17 13:03:54
Winter2010  
#7 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 5:02:42 AM(UTC)
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spence wrote:
The only con I can think of is dues.  Mine are a little over 1%.  I guess if your union is one that imposes a lot of unnecessary, strict rules on the employer, like so and so can't work in this other department, that's a different line of work, it can also be frustrating to be in a bargaining unit position.  But my union isn't like that.
Can you get in the union and then get out? 
spence  
#8 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 6:36:35 AM(UTC)
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Winter2010 wrote:
Can you get in the union and then get out? 

Yes, you can.  I think for federal employees there's one time each year when you can un-join the union, at least where I work (the IRS).  If your unit is represented by a union, the rules and some of the representation would still to apply to you as a non-member, but you wouldn't be paying dues. 

One more con I forgot is, a union is only as good as the people active in it.  If the people active are disorganized, reactive, sleazy, or don't know what they're doing, the union as a whole is also going to be disorganized and weak.
spence2010-10-17 14:46:30
lazyfed  
#9 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 6:44:53 AM(UTC)
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The unions must represent you whether you pay dues or not
martyb  
#10 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 8:55:38 AM(UTC)
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lazyfed wrote:
The unions must represent you whether you pay dues or not
 
 
Yes, and just like with a court-appointed free attorney vs. one you hired to represent, you...you get what you pay for.  Do you think a union official is going to put the same effort and diligence into a grievance or other action for a freeloader as they would for a dues paying member?  My advice, join the union, try it out for the first year, learn all you can about how your particular union local is, how active they are, how much impact they have in your organization, and then....at the end of the year, you can decide whether to stay or cancel your membership.  One more piece of advice....you're relatively new on this site...learn to ignore lazyfed.  He's not even a fed, merely a poser.
Forum trolls to 0%
lazyfed  
#11 Posted : Sunday, October 17, 2010 10:14:53 AM(UTC)
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yep take mary's advise he has had a long career with little success, he's a union man and as a result he wasted his career
petohha  
#12 Posted : Monday, October 18, 2010 6:40:58 PM(UTC)
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martyb wrote:
lazyfed wrote:
The unions must represent you whether you pay dues or not
 
 
Yes, and just like with a court-appointed free attorney vs. one you hired to represent, you...you get what you pay for.  Do you think a union official is going to put the same effort and diligence into a grievance or other action for a freeloader as they would for a dues paying member? 
 
You got that right!  As a prior union rep I can attest to that. Also, the requirement to represent non-union members is up to the 3rd step only. Those who drag their feet, get what they pay for.  Arbitration requires money from dues paying members.  On rare occasions cases will go to arbitration if it will largely benefit the local as a whole.  In most cases, people become dues paying members once this is explained to them.  Employees who are on their 1 year probation the union is their only defence.
petohha  
#13 Posted : Monday, October 18, 2010 6:49:28 PM(UTC)
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Winter2010 wrote:
What is Bargaining Unite Position and what is Obligated position. 
 
Many federal jobs have this one year probationary period.  Do most or virtually everyone else pass this period and continue their employment? 
If they stay out of trouble and do what they were hired to do.  And make that 366 days, because I have seen people let go on day 365!  SOL if not a union member.
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