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DEA

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is a federal law enforcement agency under the United States Department of Justice, tasked with combating drug smuggling and use within the United States. Not only is the DEA the lead agency for domestic enforcement of the drug policy of the United States sharing concurrent jurisdiction with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, it also has sole responsibility for coordinating and pursuing U.S. drug investigations abroad.

Perhaps you are working for the DEA or interested in working for the DEA. Here is a forum to share your experience with the DEA.

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Mr.Desy  
#1 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 11:26:44 AM(UTC)
Mr.Desy

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Mr.Desy2011-08-21 00:11:24
Beagle  
#2 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 12:14:32 PM(UTC)
Beagle

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http://www.justice.gov/dea/programs/training/part19.html

http://www.justthinktwice.com/inside_dea/get_involved.html

http://www.learningforlife.org/exploring/lawenforcement/

The Law Enforcement Exploring program and DEA have a long relationship. DEA sponsors some Law Enforcement Exploring posts, and Special Agents
and other DEA employees participate in the bi-annual national conference.

My advice.

1.  Don't do drugs, also don't hang out with people who do drugs (sounds simple but you'll be surprised how many people tried weed like it's something cool)
2.  Get good grades
3.  Get in shape

Beagle2010-11-15 20:21:07
Mr.Desy  
#3 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 12:16:48 PM(UTC)
Mr.Desy

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 Mr.Desy2011-08-21 00:11:41
Beagle  
#4 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 12:31:03 PM(UTC)
Beagle

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Mr.Desy wrote:
Thanks! I don't (and won't) do drugs, I work out, take a boxing class, and have straight A's!


That's easier said than done for most people.

When I was 13 I told myself I would never try smoking (cigarette).  Next thing you know I took a poof in high school (I didn't inhale) then in the army I was smoking the hookah (tobacco) for about a month.

Of course I never used it again after I got back to the States but I didn't have any regrets it was all legal.

BTW you can join the explorer program when you're 14.  Here are some stuff they'll be teaching you.

Typical Law Enforcement Explorer basic training curriculums include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  1. The history of law enforcement.

  2. Patrol procedures.

  3. Criminal Law.

  4. Juvenile Law.

  5. Arrest, Search & Seizure.

  6. Report Writing.

  7. Crisis Intervention.

  8. Ethics.

  9. Self-Defense.

  10. Traffic control/Crowd Control.

  11. Accident investigation.

  12. Traffic Stops – Misdemeanor and Felony.

  13. Basic first aid & CPR.

  14. Radio communication procedures.

  15. Crime prevention techniques.

  16. Crime scene search techniques.

  17. Community/public relations.

  18. Dangerous Drugs and Narcotics.

  19. Criminology.


Mr.Desy  
#5 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 12:46:45 PM(UTC)
Mr.Desy

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 Mr.Desy2011-08-21 00:12:21
chrisosa  
#6 Posted : Monday, November 15, 2010 9:06:26 PM(UTC)
chrisosa

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Mr. Desy,

It is not hard not to drink, do drug or smoke cigarettes.

If your friends are pressuring you to do any of the above, you need to stay away from them

Growing up I had friends that smoke cigarette and drink. In my House my Dad made it clear that we cannot smoke cigarette or do drug. I tell my friends no thanks.

You don’t have to have lot of friends. Have few good friends you  can trust.

 
Good luck
Mr.Desy  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, November 16, 2010 10:39:56 AM(UTC)
Mr.Desy

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Mr.Desy2011-08-21 00:12:43
blueRoo  
#8 Posted : Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:08:40 PM(UTC)
blueRoo

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It sounds like you want to get an early-start career.  That's really hard to do at a young age, but it can be done if you make yourself stand out from everyone else.  

Tips:  
See if there is a JROTC program in your high school (you can join at 14).  There is no commitment to join the military, but such classes would be good to keep you physically in shape, self-disciplined and learn about how the military part of government works.  (For MANY federal agencies, that is a very important skill even if you never go into the military.  Many civilian federal employees work side by side with their military counterparts doing the same work.)  
Spend time learning about leadership.  
Run for school office positions.  
Attend public meetings.  
Get to know people in your community who work in the public sector.   
Volunteer in community groups.  (Many small towns have a volunteer police force, where people do non-dangerous tasks such as assist with parade control, enter data into computers, monitor handicapped parking spaces for violations, provide directions at public events (such as a fair), etc.  You might be able to work with a volunteer police officer.) 
Get either your school counselor or parents to involve you in job shadowing opportunities.

When you turn 15, find an employee sponsor who would arrange for you to take a tour of one of the places where you'd like to work (say, your nearest FBI office).  
Follow up with someone from that agency who can volunteer to help you prepare a resume and highlight your best skills related to the job you are interested in pursuing.  

During the spring when you are 16 (or will turn 16 by the job closing date), starting in about February, consider putting in for a student program summer job for an agency where you are interested (such jobs that are summer jobs typically accept applications between February and May, most around April  -- see http://www.usajobs.gov/studentjobs/index.asp ).  

Since it is almost impossible to be hired in such a position at 16 years of age without serious insider connections or sponsorship, your previous attention to personal and employment development will demonstrate that you stand head and shoulders above everyone else by then, because you will have generated network contacts who can put in a good reference word for you.  

Consider accepting ANY Federal employment as a student, as this will just about guarantee you top priority for full-time employment or continued student employment later on while you continue your education (STEP = student employment).  Also, that time you spent working summers will eventually count toward your total federal employment time.  While that time might not offer benefits at the time you work, or even pay that much (if the work is temporary or part-time), the benefits of having worked in federal employment in the past will more than make up for the lack of benefits at some time in the future when you are hired as a regular employee.

Read and know everything you can about what will disqualify you for the kind of job you are interested in pursuing and avoid those kinds of behaviors.  It is becoming harder and harder to get a job at any age, and especially if you are young, if you have any kind of criminal background or drug use history.  Staying honest and drug-free will surely reap rewards for you in higher pay opportunities during your career than others your age who did not follow such advice.

Good luck.

blueRoo2011-01-21 00:15:30
Disclaimer: I've been told that I give POUNDS of bad advice about apparently everything, thus -- Take anything I say here with a pound of salt and ask someone else instead.
blueRoo  
#9 Posted : Thursday, January 20, 2011 4:26:44 PM(UTC)
blueRoo

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I do not believe there is an age requirement to take online classes here, so if you are up to it and have someone who can possibly point you to a community official who knows about these topics, you can work on these courses on your own and contact community officials to explain and tutor you on parts that don't make as much sense:


Each course you complete gives you a certificate of completion and documents the total number of hours you have completed (FEMA will mail the certificate to your home and looks no different than if you had completed a correspondence course from the military or a college).  Find courses that are related to the kinds of work you might be interested in doing.  

Find a community mentor who is familiar with the programs on that website and ask them to direct you to courses that would be useful for your desired future employment.

If you went into a job interview at 16 and knew everything this website has to offer, you very likely would be hired on the spot.  Your local police / emergency management group and other related agencies will be very familiar with the topics taught at this website.  Study materials there to give you a very good idea how the police and emergency organizations collaborate and work together during crisis situations.

Here's a link to the 2011 brochure (Adobe pdf file)  that lists how to sign up for classes and has a description of every course offered.  http://training.fema.gov/IS/docs/IS%20Brochure.pdf .  There does not appear to be an age requirement, but I can tell you from experience, some of the courses are very rigorous.  With a little tutoring from a smart parent, you'll do just fine.  

If you want to actually participate in some of the above training, almost every community in the U.S. conducts regular / annual mock disaster events.  Often, they are looking for volunteers to play the role of victim.  Contact your local emergency management organization (or police department) and see if you can participate.  If you participate in the above training courses and also act as a volunteer victim, you will begin to get a really good idea how the course training applies in real life.  Every state has different resources and focus.  Here's a link to resources in your state:  http://www.fema.gov/about/contact/statedr.shtm  

Again, good luck.

P.S.  Post a note here and let us know if you pursued any of these suggestions.


blueRoo2011-01-21 01:07:10
Disclaimer: I've been told that I give POUNDS of bad advice about apparently everything, thus -- Take anything I say here with a pound of salt and ask someone else instead.
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