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mrlewarcher  
#1 Posted : Friday, February 18, 2011 10:18:15 AM(UTC)
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He all. I am considering joining the Army. I am 40 so I need to make my mind up very soon.

My question is.....if I first join the Army Reserves for a few years and go on to join the Active Army, will I still be able to put in 20 years by 62? Or does the 20 years HAVE to be all Active?

Thanks.

cyberdefender  
#2 Posted : Friday, February 18, 2011 10:58:55 AM(UTC)
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Knight  
#3 Posted : Friday, February 18, 2011 11:28:20 AM(UTC)
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Dude, you do not want to be active duty Army at age 62.
oldnavysalt  
#4 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 3:05:09 AM(UTC)
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Knight wrote:
Dude, you do not want to be active duty Army at age 62.

LOL...LOL Knight. I agree, I am getting ready to retire at age 44.  The military lifestyle takes a toll on you.  I'm still in good health, but some days feel like I have been rode hard and put up wet.
 


Health Systems Specialist<br />Veterans Health Administration<br />U.S. Navy/Senior Chief/Retired
fatjake  
#5 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 4:01:58 AM(UTC)
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No. It doesn't work like that. Army Reserve (part time) years do not count for whole Active Duty years.
Active Army full-time years do count for Army Reserve years. This is a very common situation. As least 70% of the people I know in the USAR started with Active service.

With the draw down of the wars I think you may run into difficulty getting in the Reserves and even more trying to transition to Active service, unless you are a super professional with a skill in high demand (i.e. Spinal Surgeon).


rabbitdog99  
#6 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 9:08:42 AM(UTC)
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I believe a year of service in the reserves counts the same as a year on active duty for determining when you can retire, but your  retirement pay will be calculated on the years of active duty plus the points you earned while in the reserves.

Pick  
#7 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 9:49:15 AM(UTC)
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rabbitdog99 wrote:

I believe a year of service in the reserves counts the same as a year on active duty for determining when you can retire, but your  retirement pay will be calculated on the years of active duty plus the points you earned while in the reserves.


No, that is incorrect.  Your ADT points count towards an active duty retirement, but not IDT points.  You cannot retire until you have at least 20 years Active Federal Service (AFS).  So, a year of service in the reserves does not count the same.  Joining at age 42 does not allow you to get a retirement (something that didn't used to be allowed). 
Beagle  
#8 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 10:15:35 AM(UTC)
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rabbitdog99 wrote:

I believe a year of service in the reserves counts the same as a year on active duty for determining when you can retire, but your  retirement pay will be calculated on the years of active duty plus the points you earned while in the reserves.

 
No that's not true.
 
Your reserve time will be pro-rated so 1 year in the Reserve counts for about 38 active duty days.  (2 days per month and 2 weeks in the summer = 38 days)
 
The only way it will count as an entire year is if you were active reserve or active guard.
 
To the OP:
 
Dude don't do it, you'll be screwed if you were enlisted being a 40 year old E3 or so and taking orders from a 22 year old (That sounds worse than Mcdonalds(maybe?))
 
Then if you're an officer who is going to take a 40 year old 01 seriously. 
 
The only option is if you're like a doctor, but then you'll already be a sucessful doctor in the civilian world so why join?
Beagle2011-02-19 18:25:21
rabbitdog99  
#9 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 12:16:04 PM(UTC)
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You should check with a recruiter.  Every year I was in the Army Reserve National Guard as a weekend soldier I got a year counted toward the requirement needed to retire.  But to get those I believe my last 8 years had to be in the reserves.  But like I said before, retirement pay is based only on active duty time plus points  earned in the reserves.  I was on active duty first and then the reserves. So if you are in the reserves first and then active duty, you may not get the reserve time unless you go back into the reserves at some point and finish your last 8 in the reserves.  But please don't take anything I say as absolute and check with a recruiter if you are seriously considering it.   Plus, I'm getting old and all of this has probably changed.  Anyhow, good luck in whatever you decide to do.

Pick  
#10 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 9:54:49 PM(UTC)
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Recruiters will tell you anything they think you want to hear to get you to enlist.  Best thing to do is check the service regulations.  For an active duty Army retirement, the applicable regulation is AR 635-200.  The applicable passage for reserve going active duty is chapter 12-26d:

12–26. Periods not creditable for retirement

The following periods are not creditable for retirement under this chapter. 

  a. All time required to be made good (see 10 USC 972). (See paragraph 1–21.) 

  b. Periods of service voided by the Government other than those voided because of minority. 

  c. Time in a non-pay (non-casualty) status under 37 USC 552(C).

  d. Service in a Reserve Component not on 

   (1) Active duty. 

   (2) Active duty for training. 

   (3) Other full-time training duty.


In Beagle's scenario, the only days that would count would be the 14 days for annual training.  The 24 days worth of weekend training do NOT count for the purposes of computing your Active Federal Service (AFS).  


What your total reserve time does count towards is the rate they compute your pay (for an active duty retirement).  You are paid according to your time in service, so if you have 3 years of reserve service and 19 years of active service, you would get paid at the 22 year rate instead of the 18 year rate. 


For a reserve retirement, all good time counts towards your retirement pay.  Other services have the same rules as these are all based on DoD instruction and public law.


martyb  
#11 Posted : Saturday, February 19, 2011 10:53:50 PM(UTC)
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The number of years counts, whether guard, reserve or active.  However, it requires 7300 points to equal an active duty retirement of 20 yrs.  You can have some years of active duty, then switch to guard or reserve, and once you have completed a total of 20 yrs, regardless of number of points, you can retire.  However, the amount of your retirement will be directly affected by how many points you have earned.  Like I said, a total of 7300 points will give you the same pension as having completed 20 yrs of active service.  If you are reserves first, and then go active, you will have to stay, I BELIEVE, an equivalent number of years to accumulate a minimum of the 7300.  Again, I said I BELIEVE that to be the case.  But, as stated above, to get the correct official answer, go talk to the recruiters.  That's their job. 
 
 
In the reserves, you'll earn 4 retirement points for every weekend drill you perform, plus one point for each day you are actually on orders, meaning your 2 week annual tour (summer camp) and any other periods for which you're on official military orders.  This can include times you might volunteer for additional duty for trips, to backfill for personnel shortages, training/schools etc.  I've known people who were able to work for months at a time on military orders, which gives them retirement points.  Of course, if you have a regular job, it might be hard to pull so many extra (man-days).  I retired from the AF Reserves after 33 yrs, with 4 1/2 of those years being active duty.  In all that time, I only accumulated 4000 points.  That'll be good for approx. $18,000 a year pension when I'm 60, in 7 more yrs.  Not a fortune but I'll take it.  One huge benefit to retiring from either active duty or the guard/reserves is that it gives a person access to Tricare health benefits.  Depending on your situation, that could be a biggie.  Me...I already have FEHB so Tricare's just icing on the cake.
martyb2011-02-20 07:06:00
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vet_4_life  
#12 Posted : Monday, February 21, 2011 2:42:44 PM(UTC)
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mrlewarcher wrote:
He all. I am considering joining the Army. I am 40 so I need to make my mind up very soon.My question is.....if I first join the Army Reserves for a few years and go on to join the Active Army, will I still be able to put in 20 years by 62? Or does the 20 years HAVE to be all Active? Thanks.


You should go ahead and join the Army so you can serve your Great Country no madder how old you are. My Grandfather was a great and fierce warrior in to his 60's. You can be the same if you work and are courageous enough. You have my full support and encouragement and you should join. You will love it.    
Pick  
#13 Posted : Monday, February 21, 2011 10:59:01 PM(UTC)
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I see the facility security lapsed again.  That and the lithium ran out...
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