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alwayshopeful28  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:08:55 AM(UTC)
alwayshopeful28

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hey do any of you know what language test NSA uses? Is it the DLPT? Thanks!! 
Ruanne  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:26:22 AM(UTC)
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Believe it is the DLPT. That's what military people take who are in the same line of work. It is CRAZY hard. But you mentioned you know a less-commonly-taught language, and those DLPTs have a reputation for not being as bad. Good luck!
alwayshopeful28  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:27:27 AM(UTC)
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Thanks!! I'm actually taking two of them, one in Russian and the other in the lctl. We'll see how it goes! 
smichalska  
#4 Posted : Thursday, March 24, 2011 8:39:35 AM(UTC)
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I believe that Russian is a LCTL. At least when I was getting my FLAS awards Russian was always included (the award comes from the federal government and is only for LCTL's.)
alwayshopeful28  
#5 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 8:34:26 AM(UTC)
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Russian isn't a lctl and flas fellowships can be awarded for any language, depending on the granting department. 
smichalska  
#6 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 10:25:43 AM(UTC)
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Ah, you're right about the FLAS. I guess my school just grants them for LCTL's.

However, I'm 99.9% sure that, unless you're talking about some governmental definition that I'm not aware of, Russian is a LCTL. In fact, ALL languages are LCT with the exception of Spanish, German and French. Does the NSA have separate definitions for what is and isn't less commonly taught? I'm curious myself because I applied there. 

alwayshopeful28  
#7 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 10:40:06 AM(UTC)
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I'm not sure!! I just define lctl as something that is....less commonly taught (so vague, haha), which in my opinion doesn't include Russian, Arabic, Chinese, Italian, etc. Though according to the U of Minnesota's center for the advanced research of language acquisition, lctls are everything but English, French, Spanish, and German...which seems like everything but former colonial powers? I guess my personal definitions don't count lol. 

as far as the DLPT tests go though, I think the ones that are more commonly tested wouldn't count as lctl tests? As in they would be more difficult, so Russian would fall in that category? 
alwayshopeful282011-03-27 18:46:14
smichalska  
#8 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 10:46:13 AM(UTC)
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Yea, I always go by the Center for Less Commonly Taught Languages which, as you pointed out only acknowledges French, German and Spanish as common languages. Although, really what all this means is that those are the most funded languages. 

Your comment about former colonial powers is funny, I am writing a paper right now arguing that the Soviet Union was an Imperial power! :) 
alwayshopeful28  
#9 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 10:49:46 AM(UTC)
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Oh I agree that the soviet union was an empire, I hope you are citing lots of Terry Martin. But they were a land based empire and because of a lot of language policies, a lot of the nations they ruled over were able to continue speaking their languages while also learning Russian! And plus Russian was an imperial language during the Russian Empire. :-P 
smichalska  
#10 Posted : Sunday, March 27, 2011 10:57:44 AM(UTC)
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Well, my paper gets complicated. I am actually a Polonist - so what I am arguing is that the Soviet Union was an Imperial power, HOWEVER, I am arguing that Poland was never really colonized precisely because of the reasons that you just stated. Poland had no natural resources and was therefore, more of a buffer for the USSR. And like you said they were always able to speak Polish. Anyways, a lot of scholars are publishing about post-colonial Polish literature and I don't buy it, so that is what my paper is about. I think you have to have a true loss of culture in order for literature to post-colonial. Like Achebe - he wrote in English because the English *******ized the Igbo language. Now THAT'S a hegemonic colonial power. 

Man, I derailed this thread. 
alwayshopeful28  
#11 Posted : Monday, March 28, 2011 1:22:46 AM(UTC)
alwayshopeful28

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That sounds very interesting! Are you an undergrad or grad student? (I assume you are at UIUC....jealous of your slavic studies library collection.) 
smichalska  
#12 Posted : Monday, March 28, 2011 1:26:38 AM(UTC)
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I am a grad student in the Slavic Department at UIUC. And yes, we have an awesome collection! We used to have our very own library, but they recently closed it down and merged it with the other specialized language libraries. It was a sad day. 
alwayshopeful28  
#13 Posted : Monday, March 28, 2011 2:38:05 AM(UTC)
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I interlibrary loan so many things from there! You probably have such a good variety of classes too. 
smichalska  
#14 Posted : Monday, March 28, 2011 9:06:45 AM(UTC)
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Well, if you're focused on Russian studies then, yes! I was kind of disappointed by the lack of variety when it comes to other E. European countries, but I've taken some pretty good classes on Southeastern Europe and a few classes on Poland (so it wasn't a total bust.) 


alwayshopeful28  
#15 Posted : Friday, April 01, 2011 12:02:39 AM(UTC)
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Thought'd I'd let you all know: It was the DLPT and it was the most difficult Russian test I've ever taken. I had a horrible headache when I left it. The one I took for the lctl was actually the level 2 test and it was far easier than the level 1 russian test. 
smichalska  
#16 Posted : Saturday, April 02, 2011 12:52:57 AM(UTC)
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Good to know! Thanks! 
tannicacid  
#17 Posted : Friday, November 11, 2011 6:33:40 AM(UTC)
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Ничего себе...я уже сру в штаны! :р А интересно, этот эксамен похож на эксамен АСПРЯЛ (ACTR)?
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