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Voted one of the “Best Places to Work in the Federal Government‚ in 2010, the Department of Justice and its 124,870 employees help lead the nation in ensuring the protection of all Americans while preserving their constitutional freedoms. 
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JayhawkFan  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, June 29, 2011 6:52:19 AM(UTC)
JayhawkFan

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Joined: 2/28/2010(UTC)
Posts: 684

I
am interested in this position. Is anyone here an Electronics
Technician? What kind of skills/background are they looking for in this
position? I have a bachelors degree in telecommunications and 3 years
experience working for AT&T as a cable splicing technician, dish
network as a satellite tv installer, and KGP telecommunications as a
telecommunications integration specialist. It also helps that it is a GS-11, Monday-Friday, day watch position.


I'm curious because I see Tucson has an opening, and I am hoping that I qualify based on experience. I already work for the BOP as a correctional officer.














The Recruiter  
#2 Posted : Sunday, July 03, 2011 11:12:44 AM(UTC)
The Recruiter

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I have a few friends that work for the BOP. As you should already know working there, the BOP likes to promote and recruit from within. A lot of times the BOP will have jobs open for only current BOP employees.

Do you have any experience in the military? This would greatly help if you have preference points. With your background that you listed, and if you have any military experience and preference points, I would say you have a great shot at getting the job.   
WE NEED MORE VETERANS!
cis  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, July 05, 2011 11:30:28 AM(UTC)
cis

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It is the Comm Tech position. Telephones, radios, tv's etc... I would talk to your local Comm Tech and talk to your General Foreman or Facilities Manager for some guidance.
jca245  
#4 Posted : Monday, January 30, 2012 2:57:45 PM(UTC)
jca245

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I retired in 2008 after working for 19 1/2 years of my 20 as an Electronic Tech.
 
From your list of qualifications, you would have no problem performing the duties, but it is more than just electronics work. You also need to perform custody duties at times and supervise inmates. Sometimes you are called upon to cover other shops outside your field when the foreman is out sick or otherwise indisposed.
 
Basically, you are responsible for the proper functioning of communications,  life safety and security equipment at your institution. You need to have a working knowlege and be able to troubleshoot and repair as many as 8 different kinds of systems. You will usually get training classes, but not always. More often then not I had to figure out problems from books or call the manufactuter as speak with their tech's. 
 
 If the unforseen should happen, and someone should get hurt or escape due to your equipment failing to do its job, you are on the hot seat unless proven that the failure was beyond your control. It is a very big responsability and can be very stressful. You need to keep detailed records and logs and report problems to the higher ups as soon as they happen along with solutions to correct them.  With fire alarms, Body alarms, "222" emergency call in's and radio assistance calls; you literally have the lives of all your co workers in your hands. And this is in addition to keeping the inmate TV system working so they stay happy.
 
It is NOT just a day shift with weekends and holidays off job. I had been called in for emergency repair at all hours of the night, and in all kinds of weather and tempertures, working on a fence alarm system wireing or up in a bucket truck 50 feet in the air working on a CCTV camera outside in -10 degree weather, in rain and over 100 degrees . I was called in unexpectedly on weekends, holidays and had to leave my wife and daughter alone with guests at  our Birthday parties, Thanksgiving and Christmas. I usually had one partner that would take turns with me covering emergencies, but there were times that due to illness or other situations, I worked alone many times. Some of my counterparts at other institutions did not have good partners and had to do most of the work almost all the time.
 
It is not a walk in the park, but can be rewarding and give you a feeling of acomplishment at the end of the day. If not for that I would not have stayed in the job as long as I did. If you think you would like a job like this then go for it. Just be aware what you are getting in to. LOL
 
Take care and good luck.
JayhawkFan  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, January 31, 2012 1:05:48 AM(UTC)
JayhawkFan

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Posts: 684



jca245 wrote:
I retired in 2008 after working for 19 1/2 years of my 20 as an Electronic Tech.
 
From your list of qualifications, you would have no problem performing the duties, but it is more than just electronics work. You also need to perform custody duties at times and supervise inmates. Sometimes you are called upon to cover other shops outside your field when the foreman is out sick or otherwise indisposed.
 
Basically, you are responsible for the proper functioning of communications,  life safety and security equipment at your institution. You need to have a working knowlege and be able to troubleshoot and repair as many as 8 different kinds of systems. You will usually get training classes, but not always. More often then not I had to figure out problems from books or call the manufactuter as speak with their tech's. 
 
 If the unforseen should happen, and someone should get hurt or escape due to your equipment failing to do its job, you are on the hot seat unless proven that the failure was beyond your control. It is a very big responsability and can be very stressful. You need to keep detailed records and logs and report problems to the higher ups as soon as they happen along with solutions to correct them.  With fire alarms, Body alarms, "222" emergency call in's and radio assistance calls; you literally have the lives of all your co workers in your hands. And this is in addition to keeping the inmate TV system working so they stay happy.
 
It is NOT just a day shift with weekends and holidays off job. I had been called in for emergency repair at all hours of the night, and in all kinds of weather and tempertures, working on a fence alarm system wireing or up in a bucket truck 50 feet in the air working on a CCTV camera outside in -10 degree weather, in rain and over 100 degrees . I was called in unexpectedly on weekends, holidays and had to leave my wife and daughter alone with guests at  our Birthday parties, Thanksgiving and Christmas. I usually had one partner that would take turns with me covering emergencies, but there were times that due to illness or other situations, I worked alone many times. Some of my counterparts at other institutions did not have good partners and had to do most of the work almost all the time.
 
It is not a walk in the park, but can be rewarding and give you a feeling of acomplishment at the end of the day. If not for that I would not have stayed in the job as long as I did. If you think you would like a job like this then go for it. Just be aware what you are getting in to. LOL
 
Take care and good luck.


I guess I should have mentioned that I was a BOP correctional officer for 2 years at the time I wrote the original post. I put in for the position, and was deemed "eligible but not referred". since then I have moved on from the BOP and am currently a Border Patrol Agent. What facility did you work at? I was at USP Leavenworth.

JayhawkFan2012-01-31 09:11:42
jca245  
#6 Posted : Monday, February 13, 2012 3:23:21 AM(UTC)
jca245

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Joined: 2/6/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6

I retired out of USP LEE in Va. I worked at FCI Fairton for 12 years, before that FCI Danbury for ET OTJ Training and started as a CO for a year at FCI Otisville, NY.
A friend of mine, Harvey Ammel used to be the Computer services guy at Levenworth. He is retired also.
 
Hope the Border Patrol is treating you guys better. I heard it was a nightmare getting the proper support.
 
Kudos and Good Luck.
 
 
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