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Department of Interior


The U.S. Department of the Interior protects America’s natural resources and heritage, honors our cultures and tribal communities and supplies the energy to power our future.

The agency employs about 70,000 people in approximately 2,400 locations with offices across the United States, Puerto Rico, U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States.
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rborneo  
#1 Posted : Thursday, October 13, 2011 4:10:32 AM(UTC)
rborneo

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I'm eyeing a permanent-career season position with the NPS in California, and just wanted to get some feedback on whether it's a good experience or not as a long term thing.  The position is appealing because it seems like it would allow me to be a stay at home dad for a part of the year. 

I'd be a little worried about the uncertainty of the work year (26-48 weeks), and the unemployment benefits process.  But basically, I'm just looking for some pros/cons that to help round out my thinking.
 
Thanks!
spence  
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 08, 2012 9:46:29 AM(UTC)
spence

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Was thanked: 2 time(s) in 2 post(s)


Too bad no one ever responded to this.  Guess there aren't a lot of National Park Service posters here.  There are a lot of seasonals in the IRS forum who can perhaps offer you some related perspective.  Unemployment benefits shouldn't be that difficult a process if they only need to cover less than 6 months a year, which is under the normal time (not subject to the uncertainty of federal extensions) -- although you would need to do job searches and your base period wages might not be high enough to cover your unemployed time comfortably.  Conservative budgeting should help with the uncertainty of the length of the work year.  If you're working at least 6 months, you're eligible for health insurance, and your leave and retirement Service Computation Dates don't change even though you have time in nonwork status, so those are pros.  Did you end up applying for the job?



spence2012-01-08 17:55:47
countrychick  
#3 Posted : Sunday, January 08, 2012 11:30:15 PM(UTC)
countrychick

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It is a little risky but if you have another steady income or work you can do on the side it might work.  We have lots of seasonals and subject to furloughs out here at the park where I work but they have some real budget whoes the rest of the year, even with unemployment, when that finally arrives (at the amount that is paid, which is less than the regular paycheck would have been).  Seems a year round part time might be less risky. 
 
It is admirable that you want to be a stay at home dad though.  Thumbs Up 
rborneo  
#4 Posted : Monday, January 09, 2012 12:34:53 AM(UTC)
rborneo

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Thanks for the response and your advice.  I applied for the position, but my application wasn't forwarded on to the hiring officials. 
 
Which I guess could be the subject of a different thread (since I was 110% qualified, career-conditional).  Oh well... That's the name of the game I guess.
 
I'd still be interested in knowing what the typical work year length is for folks in these NPS permanent seasonal positions...
countrychick  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, January 10, 2012 12:58:56 AM(UTC)
countrychick

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Sorry to hear that.  Don't let that bum you out just keep on throwing them out there.  Usually our seasonal announcements go out between Jan. and Mar. (depending on how long region takes to get it out).  We are already putting them together and getting them ready to send to region.  They will come out in bunches when they hit!!!  Lots of seasonal openings usually, and the Forest Service has lots of them too (although I think they call theirs temporary).
 
Our seasonals here are usually March/April to mid August.  They are only allowed 1039 hours per year so it just depends on when we need them to come on then they usually get the 1039 hours.  But sometimes they don't, last year several ended up with 80 hours left over but we couldn't keep them on because the budget dollars ran out.  They are not allowed more than 1039 hours for the year though.  He jobs have mostly to do with trail maintenance, road grating, visitor services and maintaining the visitor areas (like the pottys).  Sometimes an experience truck driver has a great shot at the summer jobs.
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