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Department of Defense


The Department of Defense (DoD) is charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the United States armed forces. The mission of the Department of Defense is to provide the military forces needed to deter war and to protect the security of our country.

The Department of Defense is America's oldest and largest government agency -tracing its roots back to pre-Revolutionary times. Today, the Department is not only in charge of the military, but it also employs a civilian force of thousands. With over 1.4 million men and women on active duty, and 718,000 civilian personnel, DoD is the nation's largest employer. Another 1.1 million serve in the National Guard and Reserve forces. More than 2 million military retirees and their family members receive benefits.

Perhaps you are working for the DoD or interested in working for the DoD. Here is a forum to share your experience with the DoD.
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Goose1200  
#1 Posted : Saturday, November 11, 2017 3:29:38 PM(UTC)
Goose1200

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For those working as 0080's, how do you like the work and is there much room for advancement at your location? This could apply to persec, physec, SAPs, etc.

I know theres all types of 0080s in DoD with various jobs thats why I focused it on the above disciplines.

Thanks
PERSEC  
#2 Posted : Monday, November 13, 2017 3:53:13 PM(UTC)

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0080 here and I've worked in pretty much every discipline, from GS-4 to GS-15.

You can be successful as a 0080, but there are ways to make it easier for us. I personally am not a fan of the usual security specialist. It seems to be a dumping ground for people who dont fit elsewhere or who were good at one job and the command wanted to promote them so they gave them some security duties as well. It's also full of "no" men. All of which lead to security specialists having a horrible reputation, and leadership often dismisses us as the "toad in the road".

Being truly successful requires a willingness to move around a bit, and a willingness to think outside of the box, even when your peers can't comprehend it. For the love of god, do NOT go into SAPs if you don't feel like you are 100% on your game. It's supposed to be for the best (due to criticality and the fact that security often becomes as important as the mission itself) but often ends up another closet to stick people in. Problem is, messing up in that world has serious all-around consequences.

"that's the way it's always been done" about 90% of the time (to me) translates to "there's probably a better way to do it, but I dont want to try that hard"

For me I've been stationed overseas and along the east coast from NJ to DC.

Another tip: the biggest benefit I can find is staying current on my professional education. Depending on the agency, most likely, nobody is going to tell you @#$ about rule changes or updates. It's going to be YOUR job to stay current on weekly or monthly updates, and you should take it a step further and dig. Look up higher level agency rules and see how your agency has their rules within them. Find out the "why" behind it so you know the spirit of the law as well. If you're not proactive about that kind of stuff and unable to think critically or try out of the box approaches (and face the challenges of them), then you'll end up like most others and stuck at GS-12 or so.

this comes from me as a "working" 15. If some of the other senior grades were asked to do the stuff I do, they'd probably think their boss was drunk. Everything from moving furniture to stuff I was doing as a 12 (and my employees do as well). Your mileage may vary

Edited by user Monday, November 13, 2017 3:58:43 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
SD Analyst on 11/13/2017(UTC)
Goose1200  
#3 Posted : Monday, November 13, 2017 6:45:43 PM(UTC)
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Appreciate the reply and good information. Actually it is for SAPs which is new to this command. Though was told we could do any/all duties to include persec, physec, opsec, etc but having a TS, SAPs is what the position was posted for. Posting also indicated within 2 yrs we have to become sfpc and I know there are others once this is obtained. I know persec keeps this command busy as its largely scientists and engineers.

Thanks again for the info-

FatHappyCat  
#4 Posted : Monday, November 13, 2017 6:55:08 PM(UTC)

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Another 0080 here as well. Can't really add too much more to what PERSEC said. TBH though, I've been a 0080 for 5 separate agencies now and DoD has been the least enjoyable one. The only reason I'm still here is because I was given an opportunity to move out to Japan.

I don't know what it is, whether it's because they invest most of their resources on the military or because their mindset is different because they're on a military base and MPs/MAs think they know more about security than you. You're right, I'm not the guy telling you how to man a gate or fence, but if I'm telling you that you actually need to turn on your IDS at the end of the day or spin the X09 lock when you go to lunch, I'm not doing it to justify my own job. I seem to get a lot less pushback from non-DoD folks.

It's unfortunate, lots of people think that security is a hindrance. My job isn't to say no, it's to find ways to say yes. The absolute worse are when security just denies everything just because. There are times to do that, but do we really need to spend X millions of dollars for an improvement that will give you marginal returns?

If 'nothing' is happening, you've done your job right. The firefighter isn't telling you to keep the propane tank away from the house for no reason. I'm sure he'd rather be doing that all day than putting out fires.
PERSEC  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, November 15, 2017 5:27:01 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: Goose1200 Go to Quoted Post
Appreciate the reply and good information. Actually it is for SAPs which is new to this command. Though was told we could do any/all duties to include persec, physec, opsec, etc but having a TS, SAPs is what the position was posted for. Posting also indicated within 2 yrs we have to become sfpc and I know there are others once this is obtained. I know persec keeps this command busy as its largely scientists and engineers.

Thanks again for the info-



So, what FatHappyCat said is 100%, he's on the money.

As far as that goes, I've been in that situation. SFPC... this is basically security 101. Depending on your reading/critical thinking skills, this can be tough...but not because the test questions are tough, but because they are worded in a manner that no sane person would word a question. If you know that ahead of time, stop and really read each question a couple times, and know your security stuff, getting the cert in two years should be no problem. It's more of a test of "security riddle solving" vs security knowledge.

SAPS have all security disciplines rolled into them. So your collateral security team typically will have no involvement in them, and most of them probably wont be read into the SAP unless they're assisting. Usually it will consist of the security team, the program management team, the scientists and engineers, and then the director of the agency, and the director of security. That is roughly it.

I've been in those shoes in a purely scientific agency. If you want credibility with them, you need to learn what they do and a bit about how it works. You dont need to learn the math behind it, but you need to understand the technology to protect it. Example: if you're working in thermodynamics and you cant explain what a delta T is (thats a triangle with a T next to it, which is the temperature difference before/after something is done), then you're probably not going to have any credibility. If you're working with captured foreign equipment and having trouble getting approvals because its foreign and as a security guy you say "just get american equipment next time" then you've lost credibility.

As far as security standards for SAPs, look up ICD 705 for physical security standards, and DoD 5205.07. They contain the bulk of what you'l be working with.

Goose1200  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:47:47 PM(UTC)
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Great info to know. I was also told you do a lot of enforcing access only to people who have access to SAP areas. This sounds more like SCI duties but I gather SAPs and SCIs (scifs) have some similarities. Sounds like if you work with SAPs, and since access is limited you may not be put into persec or physec duties. Like I mentioned, I think SAPs are new to this command so not sure how involved Ill be as a new employee. Most of my experience is in persec but ill see how it goes.

Appreciate the info and curious to see how things go-
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