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FBI

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is an agency of the United States Department of Justice that serves as both a federal criminal investigative body and an internal intelligence agency. The FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crime.

Headquartered in Washington, DC, the FBI has over 55 field offices located throughout the USA as well as smaller units throughout the world.

Perhaps you are working for the FBI or interested in working for the FBI. Here is a forum to share your experience with the FBI.

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kiros  
#1901 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 10:19:29 AM(UTC)
kiros

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Hi everyone, long time lurker first time contributor. I have received a CJO, processing through the background phases now.

Regarding the PFT, there's no real magic or tricks. I started training for my PFT about a month after my application, so maybe about 3 months lead-up time. Prior to that I had been regularly weightlifting, focused on squats, deadlifts, bench, and overhead press mainly with around 5 reps per set, as well as martial arts a couple times a week. I passed the PFT with 16 points.

Working out gave me a better base but didn't help me pass the fitness test. Others have said it, but if you want to beat the fitness test you have to train for the fitness test. My two cents for each event:

Sit-ups: This should be your money maker, but you should be training FOR THE TASK. The sit-ups are not the same as a military-style sit up. Know the scoring criteria and train for it. I started out being able to knock out around 30-35 in a minute, then trained for the test and was able to do over 50. Since this was one of my best events I would try to knock out 3 sets of 50 every other day but wasn't too stressed over it.

Sprint: Sprint is tough. It's tough to train for and know where you are, because starting the timer and looking at it after you finish can put you off. I got 3 points in this, but went into it genuinely thinking I was going to only pass by .01 seconds. You just have to train for it, but don't overdo it.

Push-ups: This is all about endurance. Bench press is not a replacement for this, and I actually dropped weightlifting/bench all together to focus on this and the other tasks. I started out trying to knock out 150 push ups every other day in as few sets as possible, with the aim being doing it in less than an hour. After a while I bumped it up to 200 push-ups. On my best days of doing this, I could knock out around 50-52 in my first set. At the test, I only knocked out 42 and was worried my chest was going to cramp up during the run. I don't feel good about the push-ups every day programs, as I think it's too much stress on the shoulder joints without time to recovery.

1.5 mile run: Run was my weakest event and I focused the most efforts on this. I ran on a track to avoid getting injured running on a road. On average I'd run 12-15 miles per week. A slow 4-5 mile run once or twice a week with a couple of timed 2 mile runs. I never ran less than 2 miles, imo less than 2 miles is a waste of time. Keep in mind the scoring categories for this: 1 point is under 12:24, 2 points is under 12:14, and 3 is ~11:30. 15 seconds is the difference between 2 points and failure.

My general schedule for workout was something like this:
Monday: Slow 5 mile run
Tuesday: 150-200 push ups.
Wednesday: 300m sprint, 40-50 push ups, 2 mile run repeated twice.
Thursday: 150-200 push ups.
Friday: 3-4 mile run. 3 sets of 50 sit-ups or as many as possible in 1 minute, whichever was more.
Saturday: 150-200 push ups.
Sunday: Run or mock fitness test.

If you do not train for the test environment, you're not going to do well. The transition between events is challenging, and only training will alleviate this. After that 300m sprint and 5 minute break, you're still going to be huffing when you start push-ups. After push-ups, I felt like my pec muscle was going to cramp up and spent that precious 5 minute break massaging it out so I wouldn't cramp on the run.

Another big consideration is sleep, diet, and supplements. Get your 8 hours, getting poor or barely any sleep is going to reduce the effectiveness of your training. The last thing you want to do is put in the effort during the workout and barely improve because you sleep 4 hours a night. Diet and supplements are important too. I'd suggest everyone get protein powder and just have at least a shake a day. The same as sleep, you want to make the most of your training efforts and having adequate protein is important for it. Worse case scenario you don't need it and just wasted a few bucks.

The last thing I'll add is supplements. I'm not a big believer in supplements and think they're unnecessary, but I started drinking creatine while training. Research studies have shown it can improve some efforts, although the effect is small and on the order of 5% performance increase. Did it have an effect on my performance? I honestly don't know, but it's relatively cheap at around 10 bucks for a generic bag for it and I'd rather spend a few bucks on the chance it works than fail.

Overall it just comes down to putting in the work.
thanks 3 users thanked kiros for this useful post.
dmiller23462 on 1/14/2020(UTC), 1995JeepCherokee on 1/14/2020(UTC), Tiny_Fed_69 on 1/14/2020(UTC)
emaichbe03  
#1902 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 10:36:41 AM(UTC)

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I think generally you’re neglecting the fact that OP likely has zero weightlifting background. A strength foundation, which you already had going into the PFT, is necessary to achieve any material reps in pushups and I would even say situps.

So you have to tailor your training advice to someone of a non strength based background.
kiros  
#1903 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 11:17:20 AM(UTC)
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My post was just sharing my perspective and two cents rather than any advice to any specific poster. Everyone needs to honestly gauge where they are at with an actual, strict mock fitness test and tailor things for themselves from there. It's going to sting the ego but it'll sting a lot worse if you fail.
helmutyork  
#1904 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 11:45:36 AM(UTC)
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I just had a general question in regards to the medical portion of the background and would appreciate any clarification.

Once one has completed the medical exam how long does it take to find out if further paperwork is needed or when you are cleared?
1995JeepCherokee  
#1905 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 12:21:49 PM(UTC)
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Liking all the PFT posts right now since that's still where I'm at! Just completed a practice PFT about 20 min ago with very strict attention to form and got 15 points. I need some advice on the run however as I got 0 points on that.

For background I've been doing my training and practice PFT around the neighborhood which is 50% uphill at some not friendly grades. Also my loop is 1.52 miles instead of 1.5. I'm happy with training on that since I know it'll be easier on my attempt 2 for the actual. I'm now able to knock that loop out in 11:45 and feel like I put in good effort if it's only that run by itself. However on this practice PFT I dropped to 12:51 and thought I might die.

After doing the sprint and pushups I feel like my whole torso is locked up and I'm suffocating on the run. On the 5 minutes after pushups I try to do lunges and short light jogs while massaging my chest to get the blood out.

What advice does anyone have for working to overcome this? Should I be doing much longer runs when I train? Are intervals better? Should I mix in sets of pushups right before running to get my body used to the feeling? I'm really trying to knock out this PFT as soon as possible since I took some time off and am now at the 6 month mark since I took my original PFT. My goal is to get 16 points with 2 points on the run before my actual so I know I'll pass.

Edited by user Tuesday, January 14, 2020 12:57:14 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

App: 12/11
P1: 12/22
Add. Info: 1/2
M&G: 2/8
Rank: 3/25
Writing: 4/9
Panel: 6/4
Pass P2: 6/10
PFT (Fail): 6/19
PFT (2nd): TBD
emaichbe03  
#1906 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 12:45:44 PM(UTC)

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Read Tactical Barbell: Conditioning. You need to do what’s called a Runners Basebuilding.

Everything you’re describing is a direct result of you lacking the aerobic endurance to appropriately recover between events, and especially lack the aerobic endurance to run the 1.5 after those events.

You will have to be running 10-15 miles per week. Don’t worry, you will build up to that as it seems daunting right now.

The number one event people fail on is the 1.5.
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1995JeepCherokee on 1/14/2020(UTC)
1995JeepCherokee  
#1907 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 1:05:10 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: emaichbe03 Go to Quoted Post
Read Tactical Barbell: Conditioning. You need to do what’s called a Runners Basebuilding.

Everything you’re describing is a direct result of you lacking the aerobic endurance to appropriately recover between events, and especially lack the aerobic endurance to run the 1.5 after those events.

You will have to be running 10-15 miles per week. Don’t worry, you will build up to that as it seems daunting right now.

The number one event people fail on is the 1.5.


Great reminder that funnily enough I actually bought "Tactical Barbell: Physical Preparation for Law Enforcement" like a year ago and totally forgot about it. Just found it in my amazon purchases and I see there's a section called conditioning. I assume it'll be similar enough to "Tactical Barbell: Conditioning"

Thanks for your advice! Will start focusing on my aerobic endurance and comment back with results for anyone that may be in the same boat.

Edited by user Tuesday, January 14, 2020 1:08:22 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

App: 12/11
P1: 12/22
Add. Info: 1/2
M&G: 2/8
Rank: 3/25
Writing: 4/9
Panel: 6/4
Pass P2: 6/10
PFT (Fail): 6/19
PFT (2nd): TBD
kiros  
#1908 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 1:55:55 PM(UTC)
kiros

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I agree with emaiche about getting more miles in there.

1995, I said before in my post but in my opinion running 1.5 miles is not an efficient use of time. When I go running, I need to drive down to the track, warm up, run, cool down, drive home, shower, etc. Whether I'm running 1.5 miles or 2, it's still going to take me around an hour when it's all said and done. If you're out there, just keep going. The difference from 1.5 miles to 2 is at worst 5 minutes extra at a slow jog. 3 miles, 15 minutes extra. Think of it like this: in those 15 minutes of extra time, you're doubling the amount of time you're aerobically working. Everyone here is probably busy in real life, so if you've got the time cleared out to go in your schedule spend that precious time running.

Edited by user Tuesday, January 14, 2020 1:56:47 PM(UTC)  | Reason: typo

thanks 1 user thanked kiros for this useful post.
1995JeepCherokee on 1/14/2020(UTC)
1995JeepCherokee  
#1909 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:09:15 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: kiros Go to Quoted Post
I agree with emaiche about getting more miles in there.

1995, I said before in my post but in my opinion running 1.5 miles is not an efficient use of time. When I go running, I need to drive down to the track, warm up, run, cool down, drive home, shower, etc. Whether I'm running 1.5 miles or 2, it's still going to take me around an hour when it's all said and done. If you're out there, just keep going. The difference from 1.5 miles to 2 is at worst 5 minutes extra at a slow jog. 3 miles, 15 minutes extra. Think of it like this: in those 15 minutes of extra time, you're doubling the amount of time you're aerobically working. Everyone here is probably busy in real life, so if you've got the time cleared out to go in your schedule spend that precious time running.


Very true points. May be hard to estimate, but if I really boost up my running (maybe 15-20mi/week) how long do you think it could take me to see significant enough aerobic gains to pass my PFT? And is there anything I can do to really push myself over the edge and increase the speed of my gains or is it just going to be a simple matter of consistently getting more miles down on pavement per session over time?

Edited by user Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:10:01 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

App: 12/11
P1: 12/22
Add. Info: 1/2
M&G: 2/8
Rank: 3/25
Writing: 4/9
Panel: 6/4
Pass P2: 6/10
PFT (Fail): 6/19
PFT (2nd): TBD
kiros  
#1910 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:34:55 PM(UTC)
kiros

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Originally Posted by: 1995JeepCherokee Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: kiros Go to Quoted Post
I agree with emaiche about getting more miles in there.

1995, I said before in my post but in my opinion running 1.5 miles is not an efficient use of time. When I go running, I need to drive down to the track, warm up, run, cool down, drive home, shower, etc. Whether I'm running 1.5 miles or 2, it's still going to take me around an hour when it's all said and done. If you're out there, just keep going. The difference from 1.5 miles to 2 is at worst 5 minutes extra at a slow jog. 3 miles, 15 minutes extra. Think of it like this: in those 15 minutes of extra time, you're doubling the amount of time you're aerobically working. Everyone here is probably busy in real life, so if you've got the time cleared out to go in your schedule spend that precious time running.


Very true points. May be hard to estimate, but if I really boost up my running (maybe 15-20mi/week) how long do you think it could take me to see significant enough aerobic gains to pass my PFT? And is there anything I can do to really push myself over the edge and increase the speed of my gains or is it just going to be a simple matter of consistently getting more miles down on pavement per session over time?


No one can say for sure. I went from 12:53 for my first practice fitness test to 12:10 for my PFT which was just over 3 months later. There was a few weeks mixed in there where I couldn't run because of business trips or coming down ill. I ramped up the distance a bit as the months went on. I don't think there's anything you can do except just get the miles in, and make sure it matters by resting and eating right. I took creatine, but creatine boosts anaerobic power. Maybe it helped with recovery from sit-ups, push-ups, and sprinting? Who knows.

Maybe work more in a practice PFT setting so that your body gets used to the transition between events? You said you ran 12:51 in a practice PFT but can do 11:45 on bit's own. That's nearly a 1 minute and 10 second difference. It's a lot and it's a little at the same time. It's a lot of time to lose in those situations, but if you think about it it's about half a lap if you're running at a 8/minute mile pace. Just keep working and you'll get it.
SuperDuperSecretSquirrel  
#1911 Posted : Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:37:58 PM(UTC)
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Run base building as written in Tactical Barbell and you’ll see the results you want. You can do the SE first or the strength first version.
App: 11/21/18
P1: 12/10/18
M&G: 1/2019
Rank: 1/31
P2: 3/2019
Pass P2: 4/2019
PFT (Fail): 4/2019
PFT (Pass): 12/2019
PSI: TBD
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