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Disability Retirement


The federal government allows employees who are unable to work to retire under a disability retirement. It is in the best interest of both employees and the federal government for employees to remain gainfully employed in their current grade or pay level, as long as they can provide useful and efficient service without endangering themselves, others or government property.
Disability retirement should be the very last option and should be used only when attempts have been made to preserve an individual's employment, and those attempts have failed.

Order our Disability Retirement guide to educate yourself on the rules and regulations concerning disability retirement for federal employees.

To read today's top news stories on federal employee pay, benefits, retirement, job rights and other workplace issues visit FederalDaily.com.
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Guts  
#21 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 10:33:23 AM(UTC)

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Why did you not sign on to the Survivors Benefits at the beginning of your annuity? To save money? Of course. Do you think you could start at age 62, when everyone else had to pay up for S/B penalty? Get serious! That's why I remarked that EVERYONE would want a refund at age 62!, because they did not die yet.

The penalty is an insurance premium in case you die. The premium is for HER financial stability after you die, not about the size of your paycheck, which of course led to your previous decision.

I hope you find away to solve this dilemma. Keep us informed!
Grammar: the difference between knowing your **** and knowing you're ****
gembarok  
#22 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 11:16:47 AM(UTC)
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Greetings,

I see no harm in asking. The reality is we get all kinds of benefits that most civilians would say, "get serious," over. FERS DR being one. The recalculation at 62 being another. Never hurts to try and even ask for a waiver of the rule. Is it fair that I... who went into FERS DR single... could marry when I am 62 (a major life event) and get the spousal benefit? Probably not but the option exists. Never put it past those vote seeking politicians in DC to come up with a scheme to get your vote. In recent years we have seen Health benefits expanded to same sex marriages and sick leave counted towards retirement. It may not exist now but keep active on FedSoup and you may see it happen.

S/
K
Guts  
#23 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 11:33:26 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: gembarok Go to Quoted Post
Greetings,

I see no harm in asking. The reality is we get all kinds of benefits that most civilians would say, "get serious," over. FERS DR being one. The recalculation at 62 being another. Never hurts to try and even ask for a waiver of the rule. Is it fair that I... who went into FERS DR single... could marry when I am 62 (a major life event) and get the spousal benefit? Probably not but the option exists. Never put it past those vote seeking politicians in DC to come up with a scheme to get your vote. In recent years we have seen Health benefits expanded to same sex marriages and sick leave counted towards retirement. It may not exist now but keep active on FedSoup and you may see it happen.

S/
K


I understand your point, and it makes good sense, only if you were not married at the time your annuity started. Then there would be no point in the original question.
Grammar: the difference between knowing your **** and knowing you're ****
gembarok  
#24 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 12:33:05 PM(UTC)
gembarok

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Originally Posted by: Guts Go to Quoted Post
I understand your point, and it makes good sense, only if you were not married at the time your annuity started. Then there would be no point in the original question.


Greetings,

And you are right... but they still ask. Especially if you are divorced. Now we open a new can of worms where you have to ask permission from your ex-spouse if you can or cannot. Drives me nuts how a ten year investment nets a spouse a retirement portion.

S/
K
BenoitP23  
#25 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 1:35:53 PM(UTC)
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I’m not interested in a benefit I am not entitled to and am not lobbying for it if it’s not available to me under the current rules. The constituency for this is undoubtedly tiny. I’m in a less common situation. I retired in my early 30s and hoped to return to gainful employment at some point, given my young age and the expectation of medical innovations to come. It was less about having to lose a portion of my monthly benefit with the promise of a spousal benefit on the back end and more about the paying of a premium with the expectation that I would lose all benefits when I returned to work one day and there would not be a spousal benefit to payout since I would no longer be a FERS disability annuitant. As it turns out, that hasn’t and may not happen, which is why I was asking the “what if” question now.

As other life events can trigger the availability of the spousal benefit, I was simply curious if it would extend in my case. I wondered whether it might be offered under different terms like 20% of your benefit for a 25% spousal benefit instead of 10%, for example. I’ve got 15 years before I can report back, so I guess we can put this thread on ice for now. Thanks to everyone for their input.
catspaw  
#26 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 4:37:33 PM(UTC)

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just curious as to why you don't want your family to have lifetime medical if you die first. For me, I could never do that to my husband. Is she covered under her own medical for life? For me, this benefit was huge.
BenoitP23  
#27 Posted : Sunday, March 17, 2019 5:07:12 PM(UTC)
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As I mentioned, it was not my expectation that I would remain on disability for my entire working life. It was a judgment I had to make at the time, but I chose not to reduce my monthly payment in exchange for a survivor benefit I didn’t expect would ever be available. If I go back to work and earn something close to my old salary, I lose my benefit and health insurance is unavailable to her regardless. If I were 50 and not 30 at the time, I would have made a different decision.

My wife works and has employer-provided health insurance we can rely on if my benefits go away. She would be just like everyone else who is not receiving government asssistsnce. She would either use her work insurance or buy in the private marketplace until Medicare kicks in for her.
thanks 1 user thanked BenoitP23 for this useful post.
Guts on 3/17/2019(UTC)
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