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Former Lee Warmer  
#1 Posted : Thursday, July 4, 2019 8:01:57 AM(UTC)
Former Lee Warmer

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There are two listings for a job I'm interested in. Its not a great job and its not really what or where I want, but I do want to get my foot in the federal door. There are 2 otherwise identical announcements, one is open to the public and one is open to a number of categories including persons with disabilities. I have a physical disability and a letter from my doctor, but I have not tested the Schedule A process yet.

I might be able to perform the duties without any accommodation (I'd need to know a lot more than the announcement tells me), so I'm not sure if I should apply under SA or not. They don't list specific physical requirements like some jobs do, although a pre-employment physical is required. My disability is not obvious. Do I have to reveal it in a physical? I'm not looking to wrongfully conceal it but I'm also not looking to reveal it unless its going to improve my chances of getting a job whose duties I can perform, with or without accommodation. I just don't know if applying under Schedule A is to my advantage in this case or not. I'm afraid it could come down to them saying "Oh you can't do this job with that disability" even if I know that I can.
habu987  
#2 Posted : Monday, July 8, 2019 7:13:04 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Former Lee Warmer Go to Quoted Post
There are two listings for a job I'm interested in. Its not a great job and its not really what or where I want, but I do want to get my foot in the federal door. There are 2 otherwise identical announcements, one is open to the public and one is open to a number of categories including persons with disabilities. I have a physical disability and a letter from my doctor, but I have not tested the Schedule A process yet.

I might be able to perform the duties without any accommodation (I'd need to know a lot more than the announcement tells me), so I'm not sure if I should apply under SA or not. They don't list specific physical requirements like some jobs do, although a pre-employment physical is required. My disability is not obvious. Do I have to reveal it in a physical? I'm not looking to wrongfully conceal it but I'm also not looking to reveal it unless its going to improve my chances of getting a job whose duties I can perform, with or without accommodation. I just don't know if applying under Schedule A is to my advantage in this case or not. I'm afraid it could come down to them saying "Oh you can't do this job with that disability" even if I know that I can.


Apply to both announcements. Schedule A is nothing but a hiring authority, it has no bearing on any reasonable accommodation requests once you are in seat.
FrankJr  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, July 31, 2019 3:15:26 PM(UTC)
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Schedule A results in a two year "trial period"; aka, two year probation. Yes do apply to both. Regardless do not comment on disability or reasonable accommodations before, during or after the hiring process with management until after the probation period is over (if at all possible). Schedule A is not a golden ticket. The EEO office may or may not be helpful. Endless resources for the EEO process / reasonable accommodation process available. Neither management nor HR nor the EEO office will have a high level of familiarity with the processes, though.
frankgonzalez  
#4 Posted : Monday, August 5, 2019 4:00:48 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: FrankJr Go to Quoted Post
Schedule A results in a two year "trial period"; aka, two year probation. Yes do apply to both. Regardless do not comment on disability or reasonable accommodations before, during or after the hiring process with management until after the probation period is over (if at all possible). Schedule A is not a golden ticket. The EEO office may or may not be helpful. Endless resources for the EEO process / reasonable accommodation process available. Neither management nor HR nor the EEO office will have a high level of familiarity with the processes, though.
Not certain I agree with this. And, if you need an accommodation for your disability, let management know after you start.

As for EEO and HR not having a high level of familiarity with the Reasonable Accommodation process...it will depend on the agency/location. I can assure you that every place I have been, we are VERY familiar with the RA process and do our best to help the employee and manager find a workable solution to the employee's needs (note the term used: "needs". You get what you need, not what you want.).

If you are hired using Schedule A, your supervisor already knows you have a disability, so raising the issue of an accommodation is not unexpected.

You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
GWPDA  
#5 Posted : Monday, August 5, 2019 5:12:10 PM(UTC)
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Frank! Clear your mailbox, neh?

And did you see this? https://www.arlnow.com/2...ble-housing-development/

Good luck.
frankgonzalez  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, August 6, 2019 2:53:40 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: GWPDA Go to Quoted Post
Frank! Clear your mailbox, neh?

And did you see this? https://www.arlnow.com/2...ble-housing-development/

Good luck.

Mailbox empty now...and hanks for the link...very interesting! Should help some folks in this area.
You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
FrankJr  
#7 Posted : Thursday, August 8, 2019 10:14:31 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: FrankJr Go to Quoted Post
Schedule A results in a two year "trial period"; aka, two year probation. Yes do apply to both. Regardless do not comment on disability or reasonable accommodations before, during or after the hiring process with management until after the probation period is over (if at all possible). Schedule A is not a golden ticket. The EEO office may or may not be helpful. Endless resources for the EEO process / reasonable accommodation process available. Neither management nor HR nor the EEO office will have a high level of familiarity with the processes, though.
Not certain I agree with this. And, if you need an accommodation for your disability, let management know after you start.

As for EEO and HR not having a high level of familiarity with the Reasonable Accommodation process...it will depend on the agency/location. I can assure you that every place I have been, we are VERY familiar with the RA process and do our best to help the employee and manager find a workable solution to the employee's needs (note the term used: "needs". You get what you need, not what you want.).

If you are hired using Schedule A, your supervisor already knows you have a disability, so raising the issue of an accommodation is not unexpected.



One advantage of addressing the issues earlier rather than later is the opportunity to determine the reasonable nature of both the manager and human resources. I have issues with light and noise and work best in a quiet corner. The last manager at the last employer moved me from a "quiet cul-de-sac" to a "major intersection" and human resources moved me back... Needless to say the retaliation from the manager was not conducive to a productive working environment, quiet cul-de-sac or not.
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