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Security Clearance

A security clearance is a status granted to individuals allowing them access to classified information. Those trying to get a clearance may have questions such as how does one go about attaining a clearance? And, what are the different levels? As well as other questions. This area will allow those that have clearances offer advice and suggestions to those inquiring about clearances or upgrading their clearances.

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jaybsant  
#1 Posted : Friday, February 7, 2020 9:46:30 PM(UTC)
jaybsant

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Hey everyone,

I was planning on taking the FSOT exam this year (State Dept. Foreign Service). I am a naturalized US Citizen who became one back in Sept 2017. I am also a dual citizen of Mexico.

It's been a little over 2 years since I was sworn in. What are my real chances of obtaining a security clearance due to the other citizenship I hold, one of which I am willing to renounce?

Please feel free to give me any advice.
GWPDA  
#2 Posted : Saturday, February 8, 2020 9:32:38 AM(UTC)
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Your chances, like mine are excellent. I am a Dual Canadian/US citizen and hold a clearance. I did not and was not required to 'renounce' my Canadian citizenship (altho the security folks were happy that I'd let my Cdn passport expire). Under US law, the only two dual citizenships that a US citizen may hold are.... Canada and Mexico. Unlike you, I was not naturalised, but rather a Canadian and a US citizen at birth. I doubt it makes any difference, but since your naturalisation was so recent you'll have all the necessary records handy.

Good luck on the exam - it's tough. I -think- it still asks you to chart out sentence structures!
thanks 1 user thanked GWPDA for this useful post.
jaybsant on 2/8/2020(UTC)
frankgonzalez  
#3 Posted : Monday, February 10, 2020 5:42:18 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: GWPDA Go to Quoted Post
Under US law, the only two dual citizenships that a US citizen may hold are.... Canada and Mexico.
Not true. Israeli citizenship is also recognized (especially as it involves religion which raises a 1st Amendment issue to argue against allowing it!), and the US doesn't care if other countries consider you a citizen. The issue becomes if you wish to be granted a clearance from Uncle Sam. Then the other country becomes a concern...even if it is an ally.

I say this as someone who was born on a US military base overseas with a Foreign National mother and US citizen father who was in the military and so I hold a British Birth certificate and a Consular Report of Birth Abroad certificate. I've only ever held a US passport, but getting a British one would simply require applying for it.

That said, when I went through my TS clearance process, I was only asked if I would be willing to renounce the non-US citizenship if necessary. I said yes I would. I was then told it wasn't required at this time, and doing so could raise more issues (as in why would I do so, unless I was doing so for a clearance? And so be a potential target for espionage...)
You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
thanks 3 users thanked frankgonzalez for this useful post.
zizzer on 2/11/2020(UTC), jaybsant on 2/11/2020(UTC), TheUnderverse15 on 2/17/2020(UTC)
djp  
#4 Posted : Saturday, February 15, 2020 10:08:45 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: GWPDA Go to Quoted Post
Under US law, the only two dual citizenships that a US citizen may hold are.... Canada and Mexico.
Not true. Israeli citizenship is also recognized (especially as it involves religion which raises a 1st Amendment issue to argue against allowing it!), and the US doesn't care if other countries consider you a citizen. The issue becomes if you wish to be granted a clearance from Uncle Sam. Then the other country becomes a concern...even if it is an ally.

I say this as someone who was born on a US military base overseas with a Foreign National mother and US citizen father who was in the military and so I hold a British Birth certificate and a Consular Report of Birth Abroad certificate. I've only ever held a US passport, but getting a British one would simply require applying for it.

That said, when I went through my TS clearance process, I was only asked if I would be willing to renounce the non-US citizenship if necessary. I said yes I would. I was then told it wasn't required at this time, and doing so could raise more issues (as in why would I do so, unless I was doing so for a clearance? And so be a potential target for espionage...)


I don’t know the detail behind the ability to have certain clearance levels

citizens in the US can have multiple citizenships not just with Mexico and Canada

I have unclaimed Italian citizenship under paternal family tree Italian laws. My brother has gone and gotten the citizenship. I’ve held off because I work for the feds. I plan on getting at when I retire or near the end of my career and don’t need any clearance.

Others have multiple citizenship by birth when one/ both parent is a citizen elsewhere it passes to them.





TheUnderverse15  
#5 Posted : Monday, February 17, 2020 1:14:55 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: frankgonzalez Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: GWPDA Go to Quoted Post
Under US law, the only two dual citizenships that a US citizen may hold are.... Canada and Mexico.
Not true. Israeli citizenship is also recognized (especially as it involves religion which raises a 1st Amendment issue to argue against allowing it!), and the US doesn't care if other countries consider you a citizen. The issue becomes if you wish to be granted a clearance from Uncle Sam. Then the other country becomes a concern...even if it is an ally.

I say this as someone who was born on a US military base overseas with a Foreign National mother and US citizen father who was in the military and so I hold a British Birth certificate and a Consular Report of Birth Abroad certificate. I've only ever held a US passport, but getting a British one would simply require applying for it.

That said, when I went through my TS clearance process, I was only asked if I would be willing to renounce the non-US citizenship if necessary. I said yes I would. I was then told it wasn't required at this time, and doing so could raise more issues (as in why would I do so, unless I was doing so for a clearance? And so be a potential target for espionage...)


Very true, working with Navy and Army, seen quite a few come in on and as long as they got dual citizenship, got them their clearance.
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