Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Medicare and Health Care


*This is a non-medical board. This site shall not be used to seek professional, medical or legal consultation.

Medicare is health insurance for people age 65 or older, under age 65 with certain disabilities, and any age person with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). There are many different parts to Medicare; with all of these options, it can be confusing.

This forum will allow members to share their experience with medicare and seek advice* on certain medicare-related situations.

To read today's top news stories on federal employee pay, benefits, retirement, job rights and other workplace issues visit FederalDaily.com.

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
fcfed  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, March 4, 2020 6:38:16 PM(UTC)
fcfed

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 9/16/2015(UTC)
Posts: 2
United States

Just enrolled in Medicare A&B and still have FEHB. When talking with GEHA today, I was told that if I use a provider who is a non-participating Medicare provider, that I could be on the hook to pay 80% of the cost of service (of which GEHA only covers 20%) even if the provider is in-network with GEHA. This is apparently a variation on the situation where one gets assigned a specialist at a hospital or in an emergency who isn't in one's network of providers. I was a bit surprised that I could lose network coverage just by adding Medicare to my standard FEHB plan. I had hoped with Medicare A&B and FEHB wraparound, this was going to be less of a possibility, and I'd actually have better network coverage, but now I'm wondering since I don't know how GEHA's network of providers compares with Medicare's.Just curious if I misunderstood this, or if there is a consensus on whether this is a concern or not? Thanks in advance.
OUtside  
#2 Posted : Thursday, March 5, 2020 3:08:35 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
This subject has been discussed at this web site previously and, if memory serves, it goes something like this.

There are 3 types of relationships a doctor can have with Medicare, as follows: accepts Medicare patients and accepts Medicare assignment; accepts Medicare patients but does not accept Medicare assignment; or has opted out of Medicare (and requires a private contract between you and your physician).

Accepting Medicare assignment means the provider will accept as payment in full the Medicare rate for the service he/she provides. This rate is often lower, sometimes much lower, than the rate your insurance plan would allow for someone having the same service you did but who is less than Medicare age. For someone of Medicare age with fehb, the plan will use the Medicare rate (whether or not you have enrolled in Medicare Part B) and if you have Part B, Medicare will pay 80% and your GEHA will pay the remaining 20%. Around 90% of doctors in US accept Medicare assignment, last I heard.

In the case where doctor accepts Medicare patients but not Medicare assignment, the law allows the doctor to charge up to 15% more than the Medicare rate, for example, if the rate is $100, then the doctor can charge up to $115, but not more. Some plans will pay the extra $15 in this example, some expect you to pay it. If the latter, then in this example, Medicare would pay $80, your plan would pay $20, and you would pay $15 out of pocket. Note that in the first category (accepts assignment), doctor can bill Medicare directly but not in this category.

In the last category, where the doctor has opted out of Medicare, the doctor will ask you to sign a private contract where you confirm you understand he/she is in neither of the above categories and very importantly that you understand doctor is not restricted as to how much you will be charged for the service, as well as the fact that Medicare will not pay anything for the service. Note that your fehb brochure will have a page which speaks to this situation titled something like private contract with your physician, and so should the Medicare and You manual.

So I think the first thing to do would be to confirm your provider's relationship to Medicare as to the 3 categories described above. In sounds like the person you spoke with thinks it's the third category and, using the example above of a $100 Medicare rate, told you we're not paying more than the $20 we would have paid in the other 2 cases.

Edited by user Thursday, March 5, 2020 3:11:49 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
GWPDA on 3/5/2020(UTC)
OUtside  
#3 Posted : Friday, March 6, 2020 9:26:12 AM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
A couple more things to be clear about this subject. Non participating with Medicare does NOT mean has opted out of Medicare but means the second category, ie accepts Medicare patients but not assignment and therefore can charge 15% more.

And in both categories one and two, where both accept Medicare patients, both can limit the number of Medicare patients they are willing to see in their practice. But if they do this, this also does NOT mean the doctor has opted out of Medicare either; it just means dr is not taking new Medicare patients at this time.

The vast majority of doctors are in categories one and two, but note that if you use a doctor who truly has opted out and requires a separate contract as described above, the doctor in that case can charge as much as they want and should not see you unless you first agree in writing on this point. And if you do, the 80/20% relationship described in the OP's post does not really apply. Here's an example: Medicare rate is $100 but you agree to opted out doctor's charge of $500. If GEHA pays $20, you will pay the other $480, or 96% of the bill.
fcfed  
#4 Posted : Saturday, March 7, 2020 9:59:00 AM(UTC)
fcfed

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 9/16/2015(UTC)
Posts: 2
United States

Thank you so much for replying to my question and so quickly. You have allayed my major concerns.

First, it sounds like I wouldn't unwittingly receive the services of a provider who has opted-out of Medicare since I would have to have an agreement in advance about the cost. That should eliminate the possibility for example, of getting a lab or anesthesiologist who has opted-out during a surgery at a hospital where all my services are expected to be covered under Medicare.

Second, I think I misunderstood the GEHA rep on a non-participating Medicare provider, the second case you describe in your answer. I had thought that I would be responsible for 80% of cost of which GEHA would reimburse 20% because the provider doesn't agree to Medicare's rates. But if I understand correctly, the non-participating provider will take Medicare's 80% reimbursement, then GEHA's 20% wraparound reimbursement and then I would pay any additional charge above Medicare rates, but only up to 15%. I guess that could still be a hefty charge if it is an expensive service. But still much better than my previous understanding. I'll have to research which plans help pay that 15% as well during the next open season.

And it is good to know that 90% of providers accept Medicare, so it shouldn't be much of an issue.

One additional question. When traveling overseas where Medicare doesn't apply, would an FEHB plan consider the services as being in your third category or 2nd category? One of the reasons I kept my FEHB along with Part B was to get the same coverage when traveling overseas as I've had as a federal employee. But if the foreign services are considered as being provided by an opt-out provider, it sounds like I could have a much higher responsibility than previously when I traveled and lived overseas.

Thanks again for your help and expertise.
OUtside  
#5 Posted : Saturday, March 7, 2020 9:38:05 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
I would confirm it with GEHA but I think you would have pretty much the same coverage overseas that you had prior to taking Medicare. Medicare is generally not available overseas, anyway.

As to the non participating situation you discuss in your third paragraph, I think you have a good understanding of the essentials. It doesn't sound right to refer to Medicare 'reimbursement' in that case maybe, because I don't think they bill Medicare directly (but they do report the services to Medicare that they provide to you). In a couple of actual cases I'm familiar with, the non participating doctor required the patient to pay the bill up front, and then the patient sought reimbursement from the insurers. I was wondering how the provider determined the Medicare rate prior to contact Medicare, but they were able to do it ok.

As to the amounts, I read an article which said one of the benefits to the doctor of accepting assignment is the ability to bill Medicare directly and not having to contend with a patient who does not pay. That's probably the reason the cases I am familiar with required payment up front.

The article also noted that the Medicare rate in the case of non participating is a few percent lower than the accept reimbursement rate, so taking that into account and the possibility the patient might 'forget' to pay means the non participating provider may not end up 15% ahead, when all is said and done.

Remember that the Medicare rate is lower, possibly a lot lower, than prior to turning age 65, so having to pay a 15% copay for a service might not be so expensive compared to the copays you paid prior to having Medicare. Offhand, I don't recall anyone on this forum saying they were upset because of one or more of those 15% charges.

Edited by user Monday, March 9, 2020 7:46:39 AM(UTC)  | Reason: clarification

GSBS  
#6 Posted : Friday, March 13, 2020 4:09:34 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
If I just elect Part A and keep FEHB, does this mean I am on Medicare? Will I have to deal with any Medicare provider hoops like the O/P mentioned with both Part A & B & Medicare

Edited by user Saturday, March 14, 2020 2:15:41 PM(UTC)  | Reason: .

OUtside  
#7 Posted : Saturday, March 14, 2020 4:32:48 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
Best way to answer your question would be sure to understand the discussion posts following the OP's question. Not the easiest thing in the world to read and digest all of it but the answer is in there. Then the thing to do would be to confirm your provider's relationship to Medicare per the 3 categories described above, if ever or whenever the need arises or just to be clear on it when making an appointment.
OUtside  
#8 Posted : Saturday, March 14, 2020 4:40:55 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
As to whether having Part A only means you are on Medicare, as you ask, the answer is, of course, you are on Medicare for Part A services such as in hospital care, but not for doctor services. But you should be receiving a Medicare card and annually copies of the Medicare and You manual, so in that sense you will be on Medicare. Also, even though you do not have Part B, the rates used by BC for your doctor care will be the same allowances used as if you had Part B, so there is definitely an overlap in that sense.

In my view, whether or not you have Part B, it is a good idea to understand the information in this thread.
OUtside  
#9 Posted : Monday, March 16, 2020 8:24:36 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
GSBS, the point above that even without Part B, BC will use Medicare rates as the same allowance for retiree's dr care is discussed in 2020 BC brochure page 153. Note that page has a subject title relating to age 65+ without Medicare and I believe you mentioned elsewhere on this forum that you are eligible for Medicare but not yet age 65. That I guess could raise the question whether it applies to you since you are not yet age 65 but my best guess is that it probably does; if I were in your situation, I would call BC to confirm that it does in order to be sure.

In addition, your post above suggests you have not enrolled in Part A even though you are eligible and have been thinking about it. With Part A and BC Standard you wouldn't have a copay for inhospital care or for skilled nursing, which would save you $ should you require such care. As there is now a pandemic threatening risk to just about everyone's health, especially the elderly, you might want to consider making a decision about Part A and seeking to enroll shortly if that is what you decide to do.

Edited by user Monday, March 16, 2020 8:27:09 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

GSBS  
#10 Posted : Tuesday, March 17, 2020 1:44:48 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
Originally Posted by: OUtside Go to Quoted Post
GSBS, the point above that even without Part B, BC will use Medicare rates as the same allowance for retiree's dr care is discussed in 2020 BC brochure page 153. Note that page has a subject title relating to age 65+ without Medicare and I believe you mentioned elsewhere on this forum that you are eligible for Medicare but not yet age 65. That I guess could raise the question whether it applies to you since you are not yet age 65 but my best guess is that it probably does; if I were in your situation, I would call BC to confirm that it does in order to be sure.

In addition, your post above suggests you have not enrolled in Part A even though you are eligible and have been thinking about it. With Part A and BC Standard you wouldn't have a copay for inhospital care or for skilled nursing, which would save you $ should you require such care. As there is now a pandemic threatening risk to just about everyone's health, especially the elderly, you might want to consider making a decision about Part A and seeking to enroll shortly if that is what you decide to do.

Thank you for the answers over the years here! I've been out of the Office for 15 years now on OPM D.R. and won't need to make this decision for 3 more years. I have no support system for information and your contributions have been invaluable! My understanding was the FEHB is based on the minimum Medicare rate offering enhanced benefits, one reason my BCBS Standard premiums cost twice as much? I have a non network Chiropractor/Therapist that I can see up to 80 times. Under Medicare, he alone would not be a covered provider. I also live in a remote area of the U.S. and many Doctors want nothing to do with Medicare, same with some area facilities. I plan on reading up on this subject as so many things with Healthcare are subject to change, I don't like change!
OUtside  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, March 18, 2020 2:11:51 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
If you qualify for Medicare, here worth reviewing is from page 149 of BC brochure for 2020:

'If you can get premium-free Part A coverage, we advise you to enroll in it. Most Federal
employees and annuitants are entitled to Medicare Part A at age 65 without cost. When
you do not have to pay premiums for Medicare Part A, it makes good sense to obtain the
coverage. It can reduce your out-of-pocket expenses as well as costs to the FEHB, which
can help keep FEHB premiums down.'

And here is a list of Part A coverages: https://www.medicare.gov...overs/what-part-a-covers

From reading discussions on this forum and elsewhere, the only two reasons I've seen for not taking
Part A when entitled are 1) some people did not have Medicare payroll taxes deducted from wages when they
were employed and would need to pay an expensive premium to subscribe; and 2) when enrolled in
Medicare, it is not permitted to contribute to a Health Savings Acct and some people with these
accounts opt to delay enrollment so that they can continue to contribute to such an account.
GSBS  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, March 18, 2020 5:42:34 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
Are FEHB plans just based on the minimum Medicare rate, or do they add & expand benefits from the low Medicare rate & Coverage. Some FEHB plans sell for 3 to 10 times the going cost of Medicare A & B. I'm not into keeping costs 'low' for the FEHB.

Edited by user Thursday, March 19, 2020 2:12:30 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

OUtside  
#13 Posted : Thursday, March 19, 2020 10:04:09 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
The FEHB plans have their own regular benefits for covered services, for example, office visit primary care dr. If Medicare has the same covered service, such as office visit primary care, the idea of the Medicare rate being used for an FEHB subscriber age 65+ is that the dr would not be paid more more than if the subscriber also had Medicare Part B. Some time back a person posted here or perhaps it was elsewhere that they weren't going to enroll in Part B because their long time dr was good to them and they didn't want the dr to be paid the lower Medicare rate, which was lower than the FEHB allowance for the same service. Under the rules, the person has no choice about this, whether or not the person takes Part B, the dr will be paid the same for the same service.

Where FEHB has a different or better coverage for a service, often the FEHB subscriber can get the better coverage even if they have Part B but if there is concern about this, it would be best to call BC with specific questions. As discussed above, Medicare doesn't generally have coverage overseas, but FEHB's regular benefits would apply overseas, that is a good example of the better coverage. But it is likely more complicated and I can't offhand make a list one for one of all the differences.

If you are less than age 65 and qualify for Medicare, it perhaps is the case that BC and the dr you mention do not realize you qualify for Medicare. I say this about BC because they make a point that it is the responsibility of the subscriber to tell them their Medicare status and perhaps the reason they haven't asked you about this is because they know you are younger than age 65. Likewise the dr knows your date of birth.

As I mentioned above, the brochure page discussing the Medicare rate being used absent Medicare enrollment says it applies to subscribers age 65+. I don't know whether it would apply to your situation or not, my guess is it would, but I could be wrong and I think it would be worth it to ask BC about this.

If it does already apply to you, an EOB you have from BC for a visit to the dr you mentioned would have an explanation along these lines making it clear the Medicare rate is being used.

As you have described it, the dr is not in network to BC and BC doesn't pay much for his service. His not being in network means BC will set their rate and require you to pay 35% of that rate. But not being in network, the dr can charge more than BC's rate and you would also have to pay the difference.

Now let's guess the dr is in the 2nd category above, accepts Medicare patients but not assignment, if you had Part B or were Part A only and were age 65+, the dr would be limited to charging you 115% of the Medicare rate, so absent Part B, you would pay 35% of the Medicare rate plus the extra 15% above the Medicare rate. In total that would probably be much less than you are paying now, assuming the rule doesn't apply to you. But it's also possible, I suppose, that on learning you are a patient to whom the Medicare rate applies, that the dr tells you he is not taking any new Medicare patients and will no longer see you as a patient for that reason.

This is speculative, the best thing to do would be to ask BC whether and how the rule applies to you if you enroll in Part A only, if that might be your selection, and then ask the dr which of the 3 types of dr's discussed above he/she is. It's possible he is one who has opted out of Medicare and can charge as much as he/she desires. In that case, the dr would require you to sign a separate contract, as described above, perhaps the reason they haven't done so is dr doesn't realize your specific situation with respect to Medicare.

Edited by user Friday, March 20, 2020 2:18:22 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

OUtside  
#14 Posted : Monday, March 23, 2020 1:31:20 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
Info relative to above discussion from 2020 Medicare and You manual:

page 15, If you’re under 65 and have a disability, you’ll automatically get Part A
and Part B after you get disability benefits from Social Security or certain
disability benefits from the RRB for 24 months.

page 53, Visit
data.cms.gov/opt-out-affidavits to find an “opt out” provider. You can look
up a provider by their National Provider Identifier (NPI), or by first and last
name.
GSBS  
#15 Posted : Tuesday, March 24, 2020 11:08:25 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
Originally Posted by: OUtside Go to Quoted Post
Info relative to above discussion from 2020 Medicare and You manual:

page 15, If you’re under 65 and have a disability, you’ll automatically get Part A
and Part B after you get disability benefits from Social Security or certain
disability benefits from the RRB for 24 months.

OUtside, I'm on OPM D.R, not technically considered disabled under most definitions so no Medicare until at least 65. At 62 I am required to sign up for SS. My biggest concern is losing freedom and one specific provider who under Medicare could only see me 15 times, or up to 85 times with the FEHB. If I elect the free Part A and just keep FEHB, will I will find my coverage only covered at 20% of 80% as discussed above, or possibly no coverage at all for additional visits, all this because I elected Part A and would be considered on Medicare?
OUtside  
#16 Posted : Wednesday, March 25, 2020 3:13:05 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)

Assuming FEHB and Part A only, a couple of posts ago I described a guessed situation where the provider does not accept assignment but accepts Medicare patients. To the best of my understanding, that is how the numbers would work. I also pointed out that it's possible the provider is not accepting new Medicare patients at that point and might not continue to see you as a patient -- some providers limit the number of patients they see subject to Medicare rates because those rates are low. If the provider accepts Medicare assignment, the situation would be similar except the provider could not charge the extra 15% (but could similarly be limiting the number of patients they see who are subject to Medicare rates).

If the dr has opted out of Medicare (the 3rd category discussed above) and also is not in BC network, then with FEHB BC and Part A only, I think the numbers would work similarly as they did prior to your having Part A, ie, you would pay 35% of the plan allowance, but I am not clear whether the dr could only bill you for the additional 15%, as in the last paragraph, or or whether he/she could bill you for more as apparently they do now. Best to ask BC about this, to be sure.

As to whether you would be able to get the increased number of office visits for a certain service when the FEHB number is greater than the Part B number, I tend to think the answer is yes but it would be best to confirm with BC whether this is so.



thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
GSBS on 3/25/2020(UTC)
GSBS  
#17 Posted : Thursday, March 26, 2020 1:59:23 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
Honestly though, the post I quoted above with someone who elected A & B & kept FERS, then to be only reimbursed at 80% of 20%, or 20% of 80% wouldn't be a concern of mine as I think I want to steer clear of Medicare if it would limit my providers Physical/Physio benefits from 80 to Zero, and just include 15 or 20 adjustments. I'd attempt to call my FEHB & speak to them about this, however they are very busy sending me regular Subrogation forms just to make sure I haven't been involved in an accident or injury that I haven't told them about YET!
OUtside  
#18 Posted : Thursday, March 26, 2020 4:05:56 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
Sorry, there is a misunderstanding somewhere, I don't understand the 80% of 20% point either way. The original post on this thread had sort of a misunderstanding in it which I tried to explain away clearly. The best way to try to answer your concern on this subject would be to find it or something similar to it in one of my posts and then ask your question based on that.

As to getting Medicare, check out the Medicare and You manual (https://www.medicare.gov/Pubs/pdf/10050-medicare-and-you.pdf), I think you are saying page 15 does not apply to your situation under age 65, correct?
GSBS  
#19 Posted : Thursday, March 26, 2020 5:57:46 PM(UTC)
GSBS

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 10/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,722

Thanks: 302 times
Was thanked: 313 time(s) in 272 post(s)
Originally Posted by: OUtside Go to Quoted Post
Sorry, there is a misunderstanding somewhere, I don't understand the 80% of 20% point either way. The original post on this thread had sort of a misunderstanding in it which I tried to explain away clearly. The best way to try to answer your concern on this subject would be to find it or something similar to it in one of my posts and then ask your question based on that.

As to getting Medicare, check out the Medicare and You manual (https://www.medicare.gov/Pubs/pdf/10050-medicare-and-you.pdf), I think you are saying page 15 does not apply to your situation under age 65, correct?
Right, page 15 doesn't seem to apply. I might have posted some time ago that I would be forced to elect Medicare at 62 which of course I was wrong, at 62 I have to file for SS and my OPM annuity is adjusted. Yes my local Provider that I see takes medicare, with BCBS Standard he is able to do therapy not covered under Medicare. I might have jumped into a thread that I didn't belong in when I thought I read my FEHB, since I will elect Part A only, would only pay this provider 80% of 20% of his covered charges as my secondary carrier because I am planning on A which might make it my Primary carrier. Of course even that sounds wrong to me. Hey thank you!
OUtside  
#20 Posted : Friday, March 27, 2020 2:54:46 PM(UTC)

Rank: Senior Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 956

Was thanked: 48 time(s) in 46 post(s)
At age 65 being retired with FEHB and Part A only, Medicare will be primary for in hospital care and BC will be secondary. For dr care and lab and anything else that would have been covered by Part B, BC will be primary and there will be no secondary.

If the dr takes Medicare, then he/she will be either category one or two discussed above and the Medicare rate will be used by BC to determine its allowance for the service you received. If the dr is not in their network, they will still use the Medicare rate to determine the allowance and you would pay 35% of the allowance if dr accepts Medicare assignment and the same if the dr does not accept assignment plus up to 15% additional of the allowance. I don't think the therapy you receive now (which, as you say, would not be covered by Medicare) would change at age 65 but it would be best to confirm this with BC.

As mentioned above, some doctors who take Medicare patients limit the number of such patients they see as the rates are usually less than other going rates. It's hard to think a dr who has been seeing a patient, especially over a period of years, would quit seeing a patient once the patient attains Medicare age. But it is possible and, as mentioned above, signing up for Part A or B or not signing up does not alter the fact that you will be subject to the Medicare rates, so it is good to understand how this subject works. I would leave to your discretion and interest whether you want to discuss this issue with your dr or their staff.
thanks 1 user thanked for this useful post.
GSBS on 3/29/2020(UTC)
Rss Feed  Atom Feed
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.


This page was generated in 0.389 seconds.