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big mama  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:47:50 AM(UTC)
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I was recently selected for an interview at an outside agency and the job would be a promotion for me. There are 2 rounds of interview, with the 1st round being a panel of managers from different offices within the Department and the 2nd round being the two hiring managers. I scheduled the time and date for the interview with the office's executive assistant, and she followed-up with an email confirming the time and date that we had agreed upon. She then sent me an email with the names of the people who would serve on the panel for my 1st round interview, and to my surprise, one of the individuals on the list is my 2nd line supervisor. I called the executive assistant back to let her know that one of the panelists on the interview panel (for an external job that I applied for) is my boss, and asked if that could be changed since my supervisors at my current job did not know that I had been job hunting. The executive assistant said she would let her supervisor know and see if the panel could be changed...hours later, she came back and said, "Sorry, the panelists cannot be changed at this time. If you would like to not proceed with this interview, please let me know." When I was informed of this, I had to call my 2nd line supervisor to let her know that I was sorry that she had to find out that I was job-hunting in this way and that my desire for a promotion had nothing to do with my satisfaction in my current job. She understood and stated that when she saw my name on the list of candidates to interview, she let the hiring managers know that one of the people on the list works for her, and asked if that would be a problem. They told her to continue with the interviews as she would not be making the final selection.

I have never felt so uncomfortable with the process before. First, I should not have had to call my boss and apologize for applying for a promotion that was still at its very early phase, whereby there was no reason she would have needed to know. Second, as if interviews are not nerve-wracking enough, I now have to be careful with what I say during the interview because it could come back and haunt me, whether it is an inaccurate description of an incident or something that this supervisor might have intimate knowledge of as it relates to the work. I feel like I am not being provided a fair opportunity to interview. Here are my concerns:

1. My 2nd line supervisor now knows that I am looking for another job and at some point, no longer continue to work for her. If she does not like me or does not want me to get promoted, she could prevent me from moving on to the 2nd round of interviews, which squashes my opportunity for this promotion;

2. If she does like me and pushes me for this promotion and I get the job, the other candidates in this process could find out and view it as favoritism or as an unfair hiring practice. If the other candidates files a lawsuit or submits a grievance, then could the job be taken away from me in the future based on this perception?

3. If I don't get the promotion, I will need to continue to work for this 2nd line supervisor. Now that she knows that I have an interest to leave, she could prohibit me from getting assignments or other opportunities in the future that could help boost my promotion potential. Worse yet, I could view her future actions as retaliation for my applying for other jobs if she fails to give me a good performance rating, or the training I want, etc.

4. I also have concerns with the hiring agency and the idea that they would suggest that I back out of the interview (and ultimately, the promotional opportunity) because of their inflexibility to change a interview panel member whose participation in the process could be perceived as problematic. I made the certification list because of my credentials and job experience, and they selected me for the interview based on my merits. Why should I have to back out of a promotional opportunity (especially one that does not come around very often); rather than them changing one member of the interview panel who, after a candidate has been selected, would have nothing to do with the job or the person in the job?

I am wondering if I have basis for legal action or a grievance. I don't feel like the situation is favorable for me in any way.

Edited by user Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:50:18 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

smithandjones  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, May 12, 2020 9:33:57 AM(UTC)

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On the bright side, your manager now knows you want to be promoted. No shame in that.

With that said, I am wholly confused how an interview is scheduled with people outside the hiring agencies. What a surprise that must be!
ex-military  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, May 12, 2020 9:34:04 AM(UTC)
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1. Its a panel of interviewers, so a single voice shouldn't carry the day.
2. How or why would other interviewees ever find out the relationship between you and single member of the panel? Unless you say anything? Again, its a panel not a single interviewer. Besides that, people interview for promotions with current supervisors all the time, especially within the agency (or even the same office). Its expected.
3. There was no need for you to apologize. People look for jobs (especially promotions) all the time. If she doesnt expect her employees to be looking to move up, she isnt a very good manager.
4. You raised concerns about the interview panel. They told you the panel wasn't going to change. Asking you to inform them if you wanted to back out was the next logical question. They didnt "suggest that you back out". They asked you to be professional and let them know, probably so they could schedule somebody else for the time slot or just so they didnt waste their time arriving for an interview that wasnt going to happen.

You are making a bigger deal out of this than it needs to be. And No, you have no basis for legal action. What would be the issue? You didn't like the interview panel? Nothing untoward happened here.
nembamike  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, May 13, 2020 4:37:31 AM(UTC)

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Originally Posted by: ex-military Go to Quoted Post
1. Its a panel of interviewers, so a single voice shouldn't carry the day.
2. How or why would other interviewees ever find out the relationship between you and single member of the panel? Unless you say anything? Again, its a panel not a single interviewer. Besides that, people interview for promotions with current supervisors all the time, especially within the agency (or even the same office). Its expected.
3. There was no need for you to apologize. People look for jobs (especially promotions) all the time. If she doesnt expect her employees to be looking to move up, she isnt a very good manager.
4. You raised concerns about the interview panel. They told you the panel wasn't going to change. Asking you to inform them if you wanted to back out was the next logical question. They didnt "suggest that you back out". They asked you to be professional and let them know, probably so they could schedule somebody else for the time slot or just so they didnt waste their time arriving for an interview that wasnt going to happen.

You are making a bigger deal out of this than it needs to be. And No, you have no basis for legal action. What would be the issue? You didn't like the interview panel? Nothing untoward happened here.


Concur. Its rather unfortunate that a supervisor was on the interview panel but those were the cards dealt. Keep applying and good luck.
frankgonzalez  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, May 13, 2020 5:53:32 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: big mama Go to Quoted Post
I was recently selected for an interview at an outside agency and the job would be a promotion for me. There are 2 rounds of interview, with the 1st round being a panel of managers from different offices within the Department and the 2nd round being the two hiring managers. I scheduled the time and date for the interview with the office's executive assistant, and she followed-up with an email confirming the time and date that we had agreed upon. She then sent me an email with the names of the people who would serve on the panel for my 1st round interview, and to my surprise, one of the individuals on the list is my 2nd line supervisor. I called the executive assistant back to let her know that one of the panelists on the interview panel (for an external job that I applied for) is my boss, and asked if that could be changed since my supervisors at my current job did not know that I had been job hunting. The executive assistant said she would let her supervisor know and see if the panel could be changed...hours later, she came back and said, "Sorry, the panelists cannot be changed at this time. If you would like to not proceed with this interview, please let me know." When I was informed of this, I had to call my 2nd line supervisor to let her know that I was sorry that she had to find out that I was job-hunting in this way and that my desire for a promotion had nothing to do with my satisfaction in my current job. She understood and stated that when she saw my name on the list of candidates to interview, she let the hiring managers know that one of the people on the list works for her, and asked if that would be a problem. They told her to continue with the interviews as she would not be making the final selection.

I have never felt so uncomfortable with the process before. First, I should not have had to call my boss and apologize for applying for a promotion that was still at its very early phase, whereby there was no reason she would have needed to know. Second, as if interviews are not nerve-wracking enough, I now have to be careful with what I say during the interview because it could come back and haunt me, whether it is an inaccurate description of an incident or something that this supervisor might have intimate knowledge of as it relates to the work. I feel like I am not being provided a fair opportunity to interview. Here are my concerns:

1. My 2nd line supervisor now knows that I am looking for another job and at some point, no longer continue to work for her. If she does not like me or does not want me to get promoted, she could prevent me from moving on to the 2nd round of interviews, which squashes my opportunity for this promotion;

2. If she does like me and pushes me for this promotion and I get the job, the other candidates in this process could find out and view it as favoritism or as an unfair hiring practice. If the other candidates files a lawsuit or submits a grievance, then could the job be taken away from me in the future based on this perception?

3. If I don't get the promotion, I will need to continue to work for this 2nd line supervisor. Now that she knows that I have an interest to leave, she could prohibit me from getting assignments or other opportunities in the future that could help boost my promotion potential. Worse yet, I could view her future actions as retaliation for my applying for other jobs if she fails to give me a good performance rating, or the training I want, etc.

4. I also have concerns with the hiring agency and the idea that they would suggest that I back out of the interview (and ultimately, the promotional opportunity) because of their inflexibility to change a interview panel member whose participation in the process could be perceived as problematic. I made the certification list because of my credentials and job experience, and they selected me for the interview based on my merits. Why should I have to back out of a promotional opportunity (especially one that does not come around very often); rather than them changing one member of the interview panel who, after a candidate has been selected, would have nothing to do with the job or the person in the job?

I am wondering if I have basis for legal action or a grievance. I don't feel like the situation is favorable for me in any way.
You also left out the possibility your 2nd level supervisor pushes for you to get hired because they don't like you and would love to see you gone.

Seriously though...The hiring agency asked you the obvious question after you raised the issue of the hiring panel member. You were given the choice.

As for the panel members...unless you had filed a complaint against them of some type in the past, simply because they are in your chain of command, there isn't a conflict of interest.

You said "I now have to be careful with what I say during the interview because it could come back and haunt me, whether it is an inaccurate description of an incident or something that this supervisor might have intimate knowledge of as it relates to the work." Are you saying you will stretch the truth or lie about an incident or something the supervisor may have intimate knowledge of? If so...then you deserve to have that identified by the supervisor. Otherwise, what are you really worried about?

I have sat on a hiring panel where I was friend's with one of the interviewees. I identified the potential conflict of interest to the selecting official and HR, and told to press on. Turned out they did terrible in the interview (while I know they could have done well in the job having known them for about 20 years, ranking their performance in the interview, they sucked. And that is what counted. I also gave them feedback after the selection was made and told them why they weren't selected. Tough conversation!). I actually wanted to reject the whole group and start over based on the interviews...the selecting official didn't want to leave the position open and ended up with someone who really didn't work out and left a few months later.

Based on your post, if I were your supervisor, I wouldn't consider forwarding a promotion opportunity to you incase I was accused of trying to push you out!

Just do the interview, do your best, and hope you get selected. If you do well, your supervisor looks good to their peers by having a great employee. So I bet they want you to do well as well.



You should have voted Cthulu...the greatest of all Evils
tic32003  
#6 Posted : Monday, May 18, 2020 7:11:12 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: big mama Go to Quoted Post

I am wondering if I have basis for legal action or a grievance. I don't feel like the situation is favorable for me in any way.


No. You don't.
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